Course Description Archive

Archive of courses offered previously at Emory Law

2017 Archive 

The following courses are being offered in Spring 2017.

Access to Justice Workshop: Getting Into the Courtroom

Class Number: 3395; Catalog Number- Law 679, 02A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Costa, Jason F.

Prerequisites: None

Enrollment: Limited to 10 Students ONLY.

Grading Criteria: Classroom exercises; Court performance; & Periodic reaction papers

Description:Access to Justice provides second and third-year law students the unique opportunity to see how justice is actually administered in criminal cases in actual Georgia Courts and to develop their courtroom oral advocacy skills in a real-world setting. We will examine, through readings and classroom discussion, the ways in which poor and under-served populations access justice within the framework of the traditional criminal justice system, and the increasing role of accountability courts for defendants suffering from drug, alcohol or mental health afflictions. But this class extends far beyond the conventional classroom in three significant ways.

First, students will take multiple off-campus trips, including touring the local jail facility and attending actual court sessions to observe real criminal case proceedings. Second, students will receive real recent criminal case warrants and police reports and will conduct interviews and participate in mock classroom hearings on these cases. Lastly, where possible, students will interact with actual clients in real court proceedings (jail interviews, bond hearings, etc.). Students should plan to be in court one weekday morning every other week throughout the semester, though multiple weekday mornings options will be available each week to accommodate individual student schedules. Students will be graded primarily on their performance in both classroom and courtroom hearings and their participation in classroom discussion, and secondarily on periodic papers analyzing their experiences.

Please note: any students who have previously or are currently interning or doing a field placement with the State Court Division of the Law Office of the DeKalb County Public Defender will be ineligible for this course.  Additionally, this course cannot be taken concurrently with an internship or field placement in the DeKalb County Solicitors or District Attorney’s Office as it would cause a professional conflict.

*Last Updated Spring 2017.

Advanced Criminal Trial Advocacy: Criminal Litigation 

Class Number: 3396; Catalog Number- Law 852, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Rubin, Jeff & Prof. Brickman, Robert

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Motion/Brief; and Mock Trial. 

Description: The course is designed to teach trial techniques, criminal procedure and ethics. Most of the classes will involve the students conducting various types of hearings and arguments. Designed in a case-simulation format, the course will enable the students to develop substantive knowledge of criminal law and procedures, develop case theory and witness testimony, draft pretrial motions, and finally conduct a full jury trial. The course will also build on the skills learned in Trial Techniques and develop students' facility with the advocacy techniques necessary to prosecute or defend criminal cases. Students will have multiple opportunities to perform in class and will receive extensive individual feedback from experienced lawyers. Further, several classes will involve discussions with guest speakers on ethics, investigation, and forensics.

Students will be graded on their performance in class during the semester, on a written brief, and on their performance in the mock trial at the end of the semester. Grades will be based on how well the students conduct the hearings and trials, i.e., formulation of examination questions, understanding of the theory of examination, ability to frame legal arguments and make objections, and presentation. Students will also be required to draft a motion and brief and will be graded on the quality of the legal writing.

*Last Update Spring 2016

Advanced International Negotiations

Class Number: 5699; Catalog Number- Law 842A

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Balian, Hrair & Prof. Crick, Tom

Pre-selection form:

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper 

Description: After a review of strategies and styles in the two-party disputes, this seminar will look at complex multiparty international negotiations, including but not limited to: Border Dispute between Bolivia, Chile and Peru: Selected issue in Middle East Peace-- the “Right of Return”, compensation if right of return cannot be exercised, and “Water Rights” ; Sudan – CPA and Darfur; the Dayton Peace Accords. As basic understandings of dispute and conflict resolution techniques will have been covered in the prerequisite courses, we will consider an number of interdisciplinary readings including readings from Deutsch and Coleman’s Handbook of Conflict Resolution, Theory and Practice, Roger Fisher’s Coping with International Conflict, Mnookin’s Beyond Winning and Kremenyuk’s International Negotiations, which deal with research on the wide array of potential approaches to conflict resolution. (See syllabus.) The student’s paper will be based either on 1) an in-depth analysis of one of the class simulations, with a focus on the legitimacy (international law support) of any proposed solution, or 2)on the history, law, methods, practice and theory of an international dispute chosen in consultation with the professor.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Advanced Legal Research

Class Number: 3290; Catalog Number- Law 657, 12A

Accelerated Class: 1st seven weeks of semester (January 2017 – February 2017)

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Reid, Richelle

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Enrollment: 20

DescriptionAn examination of the legal research methods and sources beyond the basics taught during the first year of law school. Through lectures and practical application with in-class exercises and a final research project, students will become familiar with topics such as advanced research techniques, case, statute & regulatory research, aids for the practitioner and legislative history research.

This will be a one-credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the first seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Advanced Legal Writing: Blogging and Social Media

Class Number: 3397; Catalog Number- Law 851, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Romig & Prof. Chapman

Prerequisite: Law535A (Introduction to Legal Analysis, Research, and Communications) and Law 535B (Introduction to Legal Advocacy) or the equivalent 1L legal writing course for transfer JDs

Grading Criteria: Students will be graded on a combination of short assignments and quizzes, collaborative presentations with assigned groups, and their individual final blog designed around a topic they develop throughout the course.  Because up to 30 percent of the grade may be based on collaborative work graded collectively for each group, this course is subject to a recommended but not mandatory mean.

Description: Many lawyers write for the public in client alerts and blogs, as well as shorter social media posts. This class introduces the theory, skills, and tools needed for legal blogging. Guest speakers will address specialized topics such as legal ethics and the use of images in social media. For their work in the course, students will write a series of blog posts about a topic they choose and discuss with the professors. The final project and the majority of each student’s grade is a final capstone blog consisting of a design theme, posts totaling approximately 4000 words, images to complement the text, and other blogging features. Students also present on various blogging topics in assigned groups. Prior technical knowledge of blogging software is not required – students will learn to use WordPress, a leading blogging platform.

*Last Updated Fall 2016

Advanced Pretrial Litigation

Class Number: 3306; Catalog Number- Law 755A, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elmore, Marvin & Prof. Goheen, Barry

Prerequisite: Federal Courts; Civil Procedure

Grading Criteria: 

Description: Advanced Pre-Trial Litigation is for students who have taken Civil Procedure, and Federal Courts, and are ready for an advanced strategy practicum that prepares them for the complexities of modern litigation practice. 

The Legal Strategy part of the course teaches students to consider the theoretical aspects of strategy and methods for working through a strategy problem, and then apply those theories and methods to practical problems.  The problems involve a small business that encounters a series of situations requiring advice with respect to strategy. 

In the second part of the course, the students will learn about negotiation theory and strategy and apply these techniques to the negotiation of an e-discovery dispute.  Discovery of electronic materials, usually in digital format, creates some especially difficult, time-sensitive responsibilities for lawyers.  Practicing successful methods for dealing with these responsibilities in a learning-by-doing setting provides an opportunity to adapt these methods to the individual lawyer’s own situation and style.

This is “entry-level” subject matter in the sense that it does not purport to cover all the specialized aspects of e-discovery, particularly those faced by very large companies or by companies with unusual records retention practices.  The purpose of this part of the course is to provide lawyers with a general methodology that will, in most cases, prevent sanctions against the client and the lawyer, while being responsive under the rules to e-discovery requests and minimizing unnecessary business interruption.  However, no general method can protect against every mistake or every type of intentional wrongdoing.  And no general method can minimize business interruptions in every situation. 

This course is structured around the requirements of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence.  States may have more or less restrictive requirements, but the federal rules provide a useful general benchmark, and many state jurisdictions follow them.  

E-discovery problems arise in two distinct phases:

  • Preservation, production, and use of e-discovery; and
  • Prosecuting or defending against challenges to the sufficiency of e-discovery.

These are quite different areas and require different skills.  For this reason, we have developed two separate sections on e-discovery.  The first part focuses on preservation, production, and use of e-discovery and seeks to develop the skills for interviewing, negotiating, and organizing your electronic discovery.  A second part focuses on challenges to the sufficiency of e-discovery and seeks to develop the skills for preparing, arguing, and defending against typical motions for protective orders, motions to compel and motions for sanctions. 

The e-discovery problems also develop skills in counseling clients, negotiating with opposing lawyers, and dealing successfully with vendors.  These skills are directed at the first-in-time problems of e-discovery – getting it right at the start and preventing disputes or adverse decisions.  The course adapts established learning-by-doing teaching materials on interviewing and counseling, and on negotiation, for the special e-discovery setting.  The case law applies primarily to the second area of e-discovery:  prosecuting and defending against challenges to the sufficiency of e-discovery.

Finally, in part three of the course, we will deal with the strategy and law of class action law suits.  This part of the course will teach you how to make the decision whether to file a class action lawsuit or go it alone.  It will also examine how to think about your defense options: whether to agree to a class action for settlement purposes, fight class certification, or negotiate some variation between these two extremes,(including an overview of multidistrict litigation options).  This part of the course will also refine your understanding the law and procedure (including appellate review) related to class certifications.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Class Number: 3291; Catalog Number- Law 605, 04A (Allgood) 

Class Number: 3351; Catalog Number- Law 605, 02A (Armstrong)

Class Number: 3407; Catalog Number- Law 605, GRAD (Allgood) 

COURSES NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN BUSINESS SCHOOL OR LAW SCHOOL NEGOTIATIONS. 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Allgood & Prof. Armstrong

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria:

  • Team Role Plays and Take Home Exam (Allgood)
  • Take Home Exam (Armstrong)

Enrollment: 14

Description: This course will explore Alternative Dispute Resolution [ADR] with an emphasis on negotiation, mediation and arbitration processes. Course objectives include an overview of these processes as a complement to litigation as well as the study of and training in the skill sets used in each of the ADR processes by advocates as well as neutrals.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

American Legal History: Citizenship & Race Workshop 

Class Number: 5578; Catalog Number- Law 655A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Cleaver, Kathleen

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; In-class oral presentation; Memo; and a Research paper. 

Description: This course examines the evolution of U.S. citizenship as interpreted by courts and statutes during the 19th and 20th centuries, with particular attention given to the impact of historical events that constructed the way race was conceived of within the United States.

During the workshop we will study and discuss the Civil War amendments to the U.S. Constitution, 19th century civil rights legislation, restrictions imposed on Asian immigration, the citizenship of native peoples, the incorporation of Mexican territory and the citizenship of Mexicans, issues of equal protection, and the modern civil rights legislation of 1957 and 1964.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research

Class Number: 3379; Catalog Number- Law 560, LLM1

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Daspit, Nancy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This course introduces students to the concepts for legal analysis and the techniques and strategies for legal research, as well as the requirements and analytical structures for legal writing in the American common law legal system.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research II

Class Number: 3470; Catalog Number- Law 560B, GRAD

NOTE: This class is open only to foreign-educated LLMs only

Credit: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Daspit 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This course continues the study of legal analysis, research, and writing for practice in the American common law system. The topics covered include client letters, pleadings, and persuasive writing, along with enhanced instruction covering legal citation and advanced legal research sources and techniques.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Analysis, Research, and Communication (ARC)

Class Number: 3469; Catalog Number- Law 590, GRAD

Credit: 2 hours 

Instructors: Prof. Daspit Nancy & Prof. Glon, Christina

Prerequisite: None

Grading CriteriaRegular Assignments & Final Project

Description: This course will provide an introduction to legal analysis, research and effective legal writing. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of legal analysis and the structure of legal information. Students will learn how to navigate multiple legal resources to discover legal authority appropriate for different types of legal analysis and communications. Students will learn the concepts of effective legal analysis and will develop the skills necessary to produce objective legal analyses.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Analytical Methods of Lawyers

Class Number: 3393; Catalog Number- Law 734, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, Joanna

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Enrollment: 80

Description: This course explores the application to the practice of law of analytical methods of the social sciences and business profession. It will introduce essential concepts from economics, accounting, finance, statistics, and game theory to prepare students for legal practice in the modern world. These tools can be tremendously important and useful; not knowing something about them can be a serious detriment to the effective practice of law. Always, our focus will be on the application of analytical methods to real legal problems, such as the appropriate measure of damages or when to settle a case -- not becoming adept at complicated calculations. Our primary goal: to recognize when an analytical method would be useful in a legal situation and to develop a rough idea of how to use that method. Students are not expected to have any prior training or experience.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Antitrust Law

Class Number: 3390; Catalog Number- Law 702, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Arthur, Thomas

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: Federal regulation of competitive practices under the Sherman, Clayton, and Federal Trade Commission Acts. The course covers such antitrust problems as joint activities by direct competitors, including cartel price fixing, market division and boycott arrangements and productive joint ventures; monopolization by single firms; restraints imposed by manufacturers on their distributors; and mergers.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Art and Acts of Justice (Literature, Psychoanalysis, & Law) 

Class Number: 3464; Catalog Number- Law 621, CPLT *Cross-listed course 

Delayed Start Date: January 2017* Starts a week later so it can coincide with the start of Laney Graduate School. 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Felman, Soshana

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Attendance; Class participation; Short papers; Reading responses; and Oral presentation.

Description:A study of scenes of judgment in literature, art, and philosophy, focusing on literature’s specific ways of dealing with injustice (and with trauma) in various literary, psychoanalytic, political and legal circumstances.  We will examine both (great) literary texts and actual trials, dramas of great literary writers brought to court because of their innovative work, perceived as having pushed the boundaries of the accepted social  standards. We will try to understand: What does literature mean, and why is it important, why does it matter?  Why does a path-breaking work of art provoke each time not just a controversy but a larger cultural crisis? Topics under discussion include the interaction between justice, truth, desire, censorship, testimony, injury, memory, exile, and cross-cultural, global exchanges.

**Last Updated Spring 2016

Asylum Law

Class Number: 5579; Catalog Number- Law 691, 06A

Credit:  2 Hours

Instructor(s):  Prof. Kuck, Charles 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation & Final Exam

Description: This course will cover what happens once a non-citizen has been charged and placed in immigration removal proceedings (formerly called deportation proceedings). The student will study each step of the proceeding, with the choices that the client and her representative must make in an effort to avoid removal: responding to the charges and putting the government to its proof; determining the client’s immigration history; determining the client’s eligibility for any relief from removal; preparing a winning case on paper; preparing the client and other witnesses to testify what options are available for appeal and the requirements for filing a motion to reopen. We will also cover federal court litigation of immigration cases.  The course will cover the legal standards and the preparation of the following applications for relief cancellation of removal, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) , 212 (c), LPR and non-LPR cancellation of removal, and affirmative asylum relief, along with withholding of removal and relief under the Convention Against Torture. Given that recent developments have greatly increased the complexity of asylum law, the course will cover this area in depth. The course will also briefly cover adjustment of status and voluntary departure, as well as the admission process. The course will not emphasize courtroom skills; however, we plan to arrange a visit to the class from an Immigration Judge or ICE Assistant Chief Counsel.  In addition, members of the class are welcome to arrange with me an opportunity to attend hearings in Immigration Court at any time during the semester.  In addition, the skills necessary to prepare court cases will be emphasized throughout the course, with class discussion and scenarios

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Banking Law

Class Number: 5580; Catalog Number- Law 604 

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Elliott, Jim

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionThis course will examine the nature, content, and scope of the rules regulating the banking industry in light of economic and social purposes. The course will also look briefly at the history of the U. S. banking industry and will emphasize the economic and business aspects of the individual bank and of the industry as a whole.

*Last updated Fall 2015

Barton Appeal for Youth Clinic

Class Number: 3360; Catalog Number- 635D

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Reba, Stephen

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: None (based on individual student)

Description: Students in the Appeal for Youth Clinic provide holistic appellate representation of youthful offenders in the juvenile and criminal justice systems. By increasing the number of appeals from adjudications of delinquency, we hope to end the unwritten policies and practices that result in youths being committed to juvenile detention facilities. Similarly, by providing post-conviction representation to youths who were tried and convicted as adults, we hope to decrease the number of youthful offenders who languish in Georgia's prisons.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Barton Child Law & Legislative Advocacy Clinic

Class Number: 3293; Catalog Number- Law 635C

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Carter, Melissa 

PrerequisiteStudents must have taken or be concurrently enrolled in the two-credit class, Child Welfare Law & Policy. This requirement may be waived for students with demonstrable prior experience in child advocacy, including the Emory Summer Child Advocacy Program.

Grading Criteria: None (based on individual student)

Description: The Barton Policy and Legislative Advocacy Clinic is an in-house legal clinic committed to evidence-based reforms to improve outcomes for children and families involved in the juvenile court, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems.  Students enrolled in the clinic conduct research and engage in advocacy to promote policies to advance the legal rights and interests of children.  Specifically, students will participate in the legislative session, complete research for publication, participate in local and statewide advocacy events, and help inform the discussion of juvenile law with their own ideas or projects.  Approximately 6-9 law and other graduate students are selected each semester to participate in the clinic.

Applications are accepted prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, list of 2 references, the name of his/her ILARC Instructor, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

Detailed course information is on the Clinic website, http://www.childwelfare.net 

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Business and Strategic Lawyering

Class Number: 3374; Catalog Number- Law 630, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Aronson, Morton

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Enrollment: Limited to 25 students!

Description: This course focuses on client development and retention. Business and Strategic Lawyering is the big picture of law. It is the development and understanding of legal, business, political social and other considerations with a goal to implementing strategic legal, business and other actions to obtain the best results. The constantly changing fields of science, technology and globalization and their legal, business, political and social consequences make the strategic merging of proactive business strategies and legal considerations necessary for optimizing results. Both lawyers and business executives need to act proactively to protect clients and shareholder interests through effective strategic legal and business risk management structures and processes within the larger strategic business context. The course will include prominent guest lecturers from the legal and business communities.

This course will also consider and evaluate law firm management procedures and techniques to maximize on revenues as well as more effectively serving business clients. In the innovative driven technological economy we are living today, strategic lawyering has become an imperative for both lawyers and business executives.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Business Associations
  • Class Number: 5604; Catalog Number- Law 500, 002 (Georgiev)
  • Class Number: 3366; Catalog Number- Law 500X, 04A (Kang) 

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Georgiev, George & Prof. Kang, Michael

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionThis course surveys formation, organization, financing, management, and dissolution of sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, limited partnerships, and limited liability companies. The course includes fundamental rights and responsibilities of owners, managers, and other stakeholders. The course also considers the special needs of closely held enterprises, basic issues in corporate finance, and the impact of federal and state laws and regulations governing the formation, management, financing, and dissolution of business enterprises. This course includes consideration of major federal securities laws governing insider trading and other fraudulent practices under Rule 10b-5 and section 16(b).

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Capital Defender Workshop

Class Number: 3292; Catalog Number- Law 658, 03A

SELECTION: INTERESTED STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT A LETTER OF INTEREST & RESUME TO JOSH MOORE, OFFICE OF THE GEORGIA CAPITAL DEFENDER (PHONE: 404.736.5151; FAX: 404.739.5155)

Credit: 3 Hours (pass/fail)

Instructor(s): Prof. Moore, Josh

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation

Description: This is a three-hour clinical course taught in partnership with the Office of the Georgia Capital Defender, the new state agency responsible for representing all indigent defendants statewide in capital cases at trial and on direct appeal. Second and third-year law students from Emory, Georgia State, UGA, and Mercer will assist Capital Defender attorneys in all aspects of preparing their clients’ cases for trial. Students will become involved in fact investigations, witness interviewing, legal research and drafting, and general preparations for trials and sentencing hearings. The great opportunity students have in this clinic—as opposed to clinics that focus on the appeal and post-conviction stages—is to be involved in the effort to save lives on the front end, on “making the case for life.” That means students will focus at least as much on mitigation, fact investigation, and interpersonal skills as on death penalty law and advocacy skills.

The course component of this clinic will meet for 2 hours each week at the offices of the Capital Defender in downtown Atlanta. In addition to attending class, students will work on client matters for 10 hours each week. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis only, and students who express willingness to commit for 2 semesters will be given preference at the Pre-selection stage. Please indicate on your application whether you have taken any criminal procedure course(s) or the capital punishment course.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Catalyzing Social Impacts *Cross-listed with BUS 336/BUS 535

Class Number: 3486; Course Number- Law 880B, GBS

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Roberts, Peter (Goizueta Business School)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: See Professor. 

Description: In this project-based course, students gain experience analyzing and then developing solutions to the complex challenges faced by organizations that aspire to have meaningful social impacts. While conducting structured research that addresses the real-world issues faced by our clients, students gain exposure to the many experiments and ideas that relate to their assigned projects. They then apply this new knowledge, along with the skills that they are developing in law school, and working with Goizueta MBA students, to generate solutions that address our clients’ issues. In this way, we are also able to make tangible contributions to the lives that are touched by our impact-oriented clients.

Open to 2Ls, 3Ls and LLMs by application/permission only.

https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/preselection-for-catalyzing-social-impact/ 

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Child Welfare Law and Policy

Class Number: 3343; Catalog Number- Law 635, 02A

THIS COURSE QUALIFIES AS A PRE-REQUISITE OR CO-REQUISITE FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE BARTON PUBLIC POLICY OR LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY CLINIC.

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Carter, Melissa. 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Grading Criteria: Grading is based on participation and a combination of in-class exercises and written assignments designed to encourage critical thinking about child welfare policy and to develop specific advocacy skills.

Description: This course will explore the various factors that shape public policy and perception concerning abused and neglected children, including: the constitutional, statutory, and regulatory framework for child protection; varying disciplinary perspectives of professionals working on these issues; and the role and responsibilities of the courts, public agencies and non-governmental organizations in addressing the needs of children and families. Through a practice-focused study, students will examine the evolution of the child protection system, including the emergence of the juvenile court, and critical issues such as the legal representation of children, impact litigation and limits on governmental authority. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of legal, legislative, and policy measures as a response to child abuse and neglect and to appreciate the roles of various disciplines in the collaborative field of child advocacy. Through lecture, discussion, analytical writing and skills-based exercises, including legislative drafting and oral advocacy assignments, students will develop a fuller understanding of this specialized area of the law and the companion skills necessary to be an effective advocate.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Civil Trial Practice: Family Law 

Class Number: 3346; Course Number- Law 958, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Wellon, Robert & Kessler, Randall

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Course Work; Pretrial Conference; & Trial 

Description: Designed to build on the litigation skills introduced in last year’s Trial Techniques Program, this course will enhance students’ trial proficiency by emphasizing lecture, demonstrations, as well as regular classroom participation through the NITA-inspired learn-by-doing approach. Students will receive guidance from a highly experienced panel of instructors comprised of well-respected judges and trial lawyers. Courtroom technology and visual aids will also be presented by providers of litigation support. The case file is built around a divorce trial, with issues of custody, alimony and support, the division of property, and an interesting twist on adultery and its impact. There are no family law pre-requisites for this course, as the primary focus will be developing and refining trial skills which will translate into any litigation. Some emphasis will be placed on the substantive law of domestic relations to establish the issues to be tried, but the real goal of the course is to further enhance the development of true trial lawyers. Other components of the course will feature jury selection by a nationally known jury consultant and pretrial conferences in anticipation of preparing for trial. Throughout the course, knowledge of evidence and its proper application will be emphasized, along with effective and practical techniques of delivery and examination. At the conclusion of the semester, a full trial will be conducted by student trial teams to a live jury in a real courtroom setting at the DeKalb County Courthouse with actual trial judges presiding. This is an essential course for students interested in honing and further enhancing their abilities in a courtroom, and for others simply interested in expanding their knowledge and skills in the burgeoning area of family law. The course has been expanded to three hours in recognition of the value of the course and the time and specialized attention required to prepare law students to move immediately into trial work upon graduation.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Colloquium Series Workshop

Class Number 5581; Law 860A, 02A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Levine, Kay

Pre-selection form:  

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: Limited to 6 students only!

Grading Criteria: Weekly Papers

Description: Would you like a close-up look at the world of legal scholarship and the exchange of scholarly ideas? Are you seeking more engagement with the Emory Law faculty outside of the traditional classroom setting? Do you want to become a stronger writer? Have you ever thought you might want to become a law professor? If so, consider applying to the Colloquium Series Workshop (CSW).

Components of CSW: Students who participate in this two unit workshop attend two meetings each week: the weekly faculty colloquium, which meets on Wednesdays over the lunch hour (and includes lunch) and a one-hour class session run by Professor Kay Levine, on Thursday afternoons. During each of these one-hour sessions, students discuss the colloquium work as a piece of scholarship (and as a piece of persuasive writing), critique the author's presentation, and review materials relating to the production of scholarship and the legal academic job market. In advance of the weekly meeting, students write short reaction papers on each colloquium piece.

The CSW will be graded on a pass/fail basis, but with high attendance and participation standards set for what constitutes a passing grade. Do not apply for this class if you have other commitments during the lunch hour on Wednesdays (even only sporadic). Enrollment Students enroll in the CSW in accordance with the same procedures used for seminars (advance application during the pre-selection process). However, enrollment is limited to six students each semester, instead of the usual 15. On the pre-selection form please indicate the basis of your interest in the CSW and your prior experience with scholarship in an academic setting (law or otherwise).

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Colloquium Series: War and Security in Law, Culture, & Society

Class Number: 3437; Catalog Number- Law 770, 04A

Credit: 2-3 Hours (optional 3rd credit for law students who write research papers)

Selection: Pre-selection (up to 10 law students). Non-law students (up to an additional 5) are welcome with permission from the instructor. For information contact Professor Dudziak at mary.dudziak@emory.edu.

Instructor: Prof. Dudziak, Mary

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation & Research Paper

Description: This course is a law and graduate seminar held in conjunction with the Colloquium on War and Security in Law, Culture, and Society. The course approaches the study of law, war, and national security as inherently interdisciplinary areas of inquiry. We will read and discuss books and articles on war, national security, and the role of law. Outside speakers will occasionally present works in progress.

Course requirements: Students will read and comment on papers by outside speakers, read and discuss course readings, and write a 20-page paper. Law students who enroll for an additional credit (for a total of 3 credits) will instead write a research paper of at least 30 pages. The 30-page research paper, which can satisfy the law school writing requirement, will involve more extensive research, and students will be required to complete additional assignments, including a first draft.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Commercial Law: Sales

Class Number: 3438; Catalog Number- Law 612

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Hay, Peter 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam or In-class Exam; Early delivery option for take-home. 

Description: The first-year Contracts course typically is too compressed to deal in any depth with Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) which, in some form, is now the law in all States and applies to contracts for the sale of goods in excess of $500. This course covers Article 2 in depth and adds some treatment of documentary transactions (bills of lading and letters of credit). The Convention on the International Sales of Goods (CISG) was ratified by the United States and, as federal law, therefore supersedes the UCC, whenever its provisions cover an issue. The course, therefore, supplements UCC study with all relevant provisions of the CISG. – The course is offered in the form of a workshop in which issues like contract formation, formalities, conditions, breach, remedies are studied in a problem-solving format: Code (or CISG) law is applied to solve hypothetical cases, with court decisions serving as authoritative tools for the interpretation of the statutory language. The study of Art. 2 is a very desirable completion of one’s understanding of Contract law.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Comparative Constitutional Law

Class Number: 5574; Catalog Number- Law 689

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Klymovych, Oksana

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: 2-Short Papers (40%); Participation (20%); & Scheduled Final Exam (40%).

Description: This course is focused on comparative legal analysis as the important tool available to the lawyers in the modern world that enables them to fulfill professional duties of protecting client’s interests while dealing with constitutional matters. The classroom work includes the analysis of different constitutional models, such as UK, EU (and it’s member states Germany, France, Poland, etc); India, Canada, and China. 

Students will be introduced to the conceptual and theoretical foundations of the constitutional law from comparative perspective. They will examine how different constitutional systems deal with similar situations by focusing on thematic issues and case-law. Students are expected to participate actively in the debates and present relevant opinions on the issues in focus. 

Assigned readings include case law and legal research focused on the basic concepts and principles of comparative constitutional law.

Course Materials: The required textbook for the class is Vicki Jackson and Mark Tushnet, Comparative Constitutional Law, 2nd edition (2014). A few supplemental items will be made available on the Blackboard site for this course, at www.classes.emory.edu.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Comparative Law

Class Number: 5575; Catalog Number- Law 707

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ludsin, Hallie

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation (10%); Discussion Questions (15%); & Final 25-page Paper (75%).

DescriptionWhat do (1) corporate counsel advising Walmart on opening stores in India; (2) US government officials helping to write the Iraqi constitution; and (3) Human Rights Watch workers fighting for gender equality in Afghanistan have in common? Each must know the law of the foreign jurisdiction and how it compares either to their own law or to some “ideal.” With so much cross-border activity, even purely “domestic” lawyers now must employ comparative law. This course focuses on the process of comparing law to prepare students to employ it in their own legal practice. It will use examples of substantive legal issues from across the globe to teach students how to compare laws of foreign jurisdictions, taking into consideration culture, economics, and regional law, among other factors that create the similarities and differences between jurisdictions. Along the way, students will gain new insight into their own system of law.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Complex Litigation

Class Number: 3347; Catalog Number- Law 610, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Freer, Richard 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionA study of the metamorphosis of litigation from the simple two-party model to multi-party, multi-claim litigation increasingly prevalent today, including the causes of this change and ability of the legal system to resolve such disputes. The course centers on a detailed study of the class action device, including jurisdictional and due process implications. Also included is the study of the problem of duplicative state and federal litigation, judicial control of complex cases, including multi-district litigation procedures and the case management movement, discovery (including international and e-discovery), and problems relating to preclusion in complex cases.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Conflict of Laws 

Class Number: 3439; Catalog Number- Law 709, 12A;

Class Number: 5601; Catalog Number- Law 709, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only)

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Hay, Peter; Prof. Ahdieh, Robert (online only)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: When a case has interstate or international aspects – for instance: place of contracting and performance differ, a tort has cross-border effects, one party seeks an ex parte divorce or maintenance or child custody modification in another state or country, or an intestate decedent leaves property in different places -, the first question that rises: which court or courts have jurisdiction?  Second, the court that does entertain the case must then decide which law to apply. (The anticipated answer to this question may influence the plaintiff’s choice of court in the first place). Third, if a successful plaintiff finds no assets locally, s/he needs to get the judgment recognized and enforced in a state or country where the debtor defendant does have assets. – The course offers a good review of important aspects of civil procedure and treats choice of the applicable law and judgment recognition in depth. The focus is on interstate conflicts cases but the course also contains comparative and international material in all of its parts.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Online Course Description: Conflict of Laws examines the legal problems that arise when an occurrence or a case cuts across state or national boundaries: Jurisdiction of courts, enforceability of foreign judgments, and choice of applicable law. The focus is on the policies, the rules of law, and the constitutional requirements in private interstate law.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Investigations

ClassNumber: 5576; Catalog Number- Law 622A, 000

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Levine, Kay

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam & Class Participation

Description: This course examines the constitutional rules governing criminal investigations, including searches and seizures, the interrogation of witnesses and suspects, and the roles played by prosecutors and defense attorneys during the investigative stages of criminal cases. The course studies the current constitutional rules governing these essential police practices, the development of these rules, and the relevant but conflicting policy arguments favoring efficient law enforcement and individual liberty that arise in these cases.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Constitutional Rights: Constitutional Controversies

Class Number: 5700; Catalog Number- Law 698L

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Perry, Michael 

Prerequisite: None (1Ls who have not taken Con Law, please contact instructor 1st)

Grading CriteriaCourse Participation and Take-home Exam

DescriptionIn the last half-century, the Supreme Court of the United States has resolved, on the basis of the Constitution of the United States, several greatly contested "rights" controversies—controversies concerning, e.g., gun control, capital punishment, race-based affirmative action, abortion, physician-assisted suicide, and, most recently, same-sex marriage.  In this course, we will study those (and other) controversies and evaluate the Supreme Court’s decisions.  A principal, recurring issue throughout the course:  In resolving such controversies, what role should the Supreme Court play:  how large a role, or how small?  The final exam will be of the “take home” variety.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Copyright Law

Class Number: 3352; Catalog Number- Law 710, 02A 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Holbrook, Tim

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Participation & Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionCopyright law protects original works, such as books, music, paintings, photographs, architectural works and software. This course examines copyright law, including what works are eligible for copyright protection, what rights are afforded to copyright owners of particular original works, and how copyright responds to technological developments. The course also explores copyright infringement, various defenses to infringement (such as fair use), and remedies.  The class will also explore the theories that justify copyright protection in the US, in contrast to other jurisdictions, and the persuasiveness of such theories.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Corporate Finance

Class Number: 3440; Catalog Number- Law 712, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, George

Prerequisites: Business Associations 

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: A study of the financial and economic theory underlying legal doctrines in corporate finance, and the relationship between these doctrines. Focuses on decisions about "value" in the context of such areas as bankruptcy reorganization, dissenters' appraisal rights, and public utility regulation. Problems of capital structure and the duties of directors to various classes of claimants are studied in light of decisions about dividend policy and reinvestment. Includes a brief review of modern portfolio theory. 

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I

Class Number: 3334; Catalog Number- Law 959, 01A

Class Number: 3350; Catalog Number- Law 959, 02A 

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Metzger, Janet

Prerequisite: Evidence & Trial Techniques;

Grading Criteria: Class work

Enrollment: Strictly limited to 12 students!

Class open only to 3Ls

Description: This course introduces students to basic acting, directing, and writing tools a lawyer needs to motivate and persuade jurors and applies these tools to courtroom performance. Using lectures, exercises, readings, individual performance and video playback, the course helps students develop concentration, observation skills, storytelling, spontaneity, and physical and vocal technique. Students also gain practical experience applying these tools to the presentation of openings and closings as well as questioning witnesses and jurors.

Students reflected on what they gained from taking this class:

"I think what is most drastically different is how much more professional I came across later in the semester."

-Ben S.

"The largest benefit I drew from our class was the ability to stand comfortably in front of a group of people."

-Diana S.

"The most valuable aspect is practice, practice, practice, especially when combined with live and individualized feedback. I can make presentations with significantly less internal anxiety than before, and with more organization and the outward appearance of credibility." -Andrew R.

"This class taught me that putting work into your speaking style can really pay off! I also found the freedom during this class to try some experiments with my speaking technique, including not memorizing a script and moving about my space." -Alan W.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama II

Class Number: 5777; Catalog Number- Law 960

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor: Prof. Metzger, Janet

Prerequisite: Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I

Grading Criteria: Participation & Group Assignment

Enrollment: Strictly limited to 12 students

Description: This follow-up course to Courtroom Persuasion Drama I applies theater arts techniques to the practical development of persuasive presentation skills in any high-pressure setting, especially the courtroom.

In this advanced class, you will build on performance skills learned in Courtroom Persuasion Drama I in order to present a more compelling and persuasive case story. You will gain practical experience applying skills and techniques of communication and storytelling learned in CPDI to the components of a trial from initial interview through closing arguments.

You can expect to increase your creativity in storytelling through improvisation; develop visualization by increasing awareness of and sensitivity to images in written language; feel confident in your own unique style of communication.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Criminal Competency & Responsibility Practicum (Workshop)

Class Number: 5694; Catalog Number- Law 622E

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Deets, Annie   

Prerequisite: Criminal Law; Constitutional Law; & Mental Health Issues in the Criminal Justice System.

Grading Criteria: Participation; Court Performance; & Experiential Reaction Papers

Enrollment: Limited to 8 Students!

Description: The Criminal Competency and Responsibility Practicum provides a supplemental class to second and third-year law students who have previously taken Law 622D. Students will have the unique opportunity to see how justice is actually administered in the context of criminal cases involving issues of competency or criminal responsibility in Georgia Courts and to develop their courtroom advocacy skills. We will examine, through readings and classroom discussion, the ways in which mental health cases fit or rather do not fit within the framework of the traditional criminal justice system and the practical implication of raising issues of mental health issues of competency, criminal responsibility or even offering evidence of mental health as mitigation. This class will have a classroom component but will also extend beyond that into the real and very complex practice of criminal law involving mental health issues. Students will take multiple off-campus trips, including touring the local mental health service providers, interacting with the NICK Project (a collaboration between the DeKalb Public Defender’s Office, Atlanta Legal Aid, and the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities) and attending actual court sessions to observe criminal case proceedings. Student will also review real competency evaluations and will conduct interviews with actual defendants, participate in discharge planning with social workers and community service providers, observe actual competency evaluations, and participate in mock classroom hearings on issues of competency, responsibility, and civil commitment. Lastly, where possible, students will represent their clients in actual court proceedings (bond hearings, motions hearings, competency hearings, pleas.) Students may have an opportunity to brief and argue motions regarding mental health issues with policy implications. Students will be graded primarily on their performance in both classroom and courtroom hearings and their participation in classroom discussion, and secondarily on periodic papers analyzing their experiences.

Please note: any students who are currently interning or doing a field placement the Law Office of the DeKalb County Public Defender will be ineligible for this course. Additionally, this course cannot be taken concurrently with an internship or field placement in the DeKalb County Solicitors or District Attorney’s Office, as it would cause a professional conflict.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Criminal Pretrial Motions Practice Workshop 

Class Number: 5577; Catalog Number- Law 622X

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Krepp, Thomas  

Prerequisite: Completion or co-requisite of the Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Investigations course.

Grading Criteria: In-class oral advocacy assignments; Written advocacy assignments; & Participation.

Description: This workshop will provide practical skills training in the area of pre-trial criminal litigation for a small number of students. Class will meet once a week for approximately 2.5 hours, and will generally consist of each student performing an oral advocacy assignment. In addition, written advocacy assignments will be due from time to time. The emphasis of the class will be on building off of the students' substantive knowledge of criminal procedure by learning how it is applied to "real world" pre-trial criminal litigation.

*Last Updated Fall 2015

Directed research is an independent scholarly project of your own design, meant to lead to the production of an original work of scholarship. Once you have secured a faculty advisor and have defined your project, you should download the directed research form (see below). In this form, indicate whether you are seeking one unit (a 15 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.) or two units (a 30 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.).

Complete information and the application form are available on the secure Directed Research web page »

Doing Deals: Accounting in Action

Class Number: 3336; Catalog Number- Law 659E, 09A

Class Number: 5767; Catalog Number- Law 659E, 09B

STUDENTS WHO HAVE PREVIOUSLY TAKEN ACCOUNTING OR FINANCE COURSES ARE NOW PERMITTED TO TAKE THIS CLASS ON A PASS/FAIL BASIS ONLY WHICH WILL TAKE UP THREE OF THEIR SIX PASS/FAIL HOURS. 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: None 

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: This course is designed for those liberal arts majors who know nothing about accounting and finance. Students will learn about the fundamental financial statement concepts. Then the course will turn to the study of how lawyers use those concepts in practice.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Doing Deals: Commercial Real Estate Transactions

Class Number: 3337; Catalog Number- Law 659G, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elliott & Prof. Taylor

Prerequisite: Real Estate Finance (concurrent okay) and Contract Drafting

Grading Criteria: Midterm; Participation; & Drafting of Documents

Enrollment: 18

Description: This course will concentrate on sales, finance and leasing of commercial real estate. It will require significant amounts of time devoted to financial analysis of real estate projects and to negotiating and drafting of documents. It is designed specifically to include JD, LLM, and MBA students. Work groups will consist of JD, LLM, and MBA students working together as lawyer and client to analyze, negotiate and document the acquisition and subsequent leasing of a shopping center. The text for the course is a business school real estate finance text. Legal materials will be made available as handouts. A basic knowledge of Excel will be helpful but not required.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting
  • Class Number: 3394; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 09A 
  • Class Number: 3385; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 09B
  • Class Number: 5763; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 09C
  • Class Number: 3370; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04A
  • Class Number: 3367; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04B 
  • Class Number: 3368; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04C 
  • Class Number: 3383; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04D 
  • Class Number: 3369; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04E 

NOTE: CONTRACT DRAFTING AND DEAL SKILLS WILL BE PREREQUISITES TO ALL DOING DEALS CAPSTONE COURSES

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (highly recommended as prerequisite, but can be taken concurrently)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course teaches students the principles of drafting commercial agreements. Although the course will be of particular interest to students pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

In this course, students will learn how transactional lawyers translate the business deal into contract provisions, as well as techniques for minimizing ambiguity and drafting with clarity. Through a combination of lecture, hands-on drafting exercises, and extensive homework assignments, students will learn about different types of contracts, other documents used in commercial transactions, and the drafting problems the contracts and documents present. The course will also focus on how a drafter can add value to a deal by finding, analyzing, and resolving business issues.

The grade will be based on specific homework assignments and class participation.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Doing Deals: Corporate Practice

Class Number: 3338; Catalog Number- Law 659H, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. New, Randy & Prof. Mazzone, Dominic

Prerequisite: Business Associations

Grading Criteria: Written Problems and Class Participation

Enrollment: 12

Description: The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm or solo practice setting. This course will provide students with broad exposure to a variety of corporate problems, including contract negotiation and drafting typical of current corporate practice, complex corporate structuring issues, joint ventures, and non-litigation corporate dispute resolution. The course exercises will involve questions of corporate, tax, employment, and debtor-creditor law. Although prior course work in these areas is not required, it is preferable to have some interest in and familiarity with these areas.

Because student participation is essential for the success of this practice-simulation course, attendance is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade. This course also requires collaborative work with other students and meetings with the adjunct faculty. You will be required to schedule several meetings in addition to regular class time. In addition, any students on the wait list for this class must attend the first class meeting, which sets the stage for the first several weeks of assignments.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Doing Deals: Deal Skills
  • Class Number: 3339; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04A 
  • Class Number: 3344; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04B
  • Class Number: 3357; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04D
  • Class Number: 3358; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04E 
  • Class Number: 3359; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04F 
  • Class Number: 3371; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04G
  • Class Number: 5674; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04C

NOTE: CONTRACT DRAFTING AND DEAL SKILLS WILL BE PREREQUISITES TO ALL DOING DEALS CAPSTONE COURSES

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Contract Drafting (required – concurrent not okay); Business Associations

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: Deal Skills builds on the skills and concepts learned in Contract Drafting and emphasizes the skills and thought processes involved in, and required by, the practice of transactional law.  The course introduces students to business and legal issues common to commercial transactions, such as M&A deals, license agreements, commercial real estate transactions, financing transactions, and other typical transactions.  Students learn to interview, counsel, and communicate with simulated clients; conduct various types of due diligence; translate a business deal into contract provisions; understand basic transaction structure, finance, and risk reduction techniques; and negotiate and collaboratively draft an agreement for a simulated transaction.   Classes involve both individual and group work, with in-class exercises, role-plays and oral reports supported by lecture and weekly homework assignments.  The course grade is based on homework, class participation, a negotiation project, and a comprehensive individual project.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Doing Deals: International Securities

Class Number: 5698; Catalog Number- Law 659I

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Smith, Nate

Prerequisite: Business Associations; Doing Deals:  Contract Drafting;  Doing Deals:  Deal Skills (concurrent not okay). Recommended prerequisites or co-requisites:  Securities Regulation; Corporate Finance.

Grading Criteria: Participation in Simulated Transaction; Written Assignments; & Participation (NO EXAM)

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course simulates the work that would be done by a law firm associate for an unregistered international securities offering pursuant to the exemptions provided by Rule 144A and Regulation S under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.   Topics will include U.S. federal securities law registration requirements and exemptions (with a focus on Rule 144A and Regulation S); due diligence for a securities offering; the purpose and content of various sections of an Offering Memorandum; provisions of the securities purchase agreement; addressing aspects of local law in foreign jurisdictions; comfort letters; opinion practice; the closing process; and ethics and professionalism issues relating to securities offerings.  Student performance will be assessed based on class participation, in-class exercises, written homework assignments, and a take-home exam.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Doing Deals: Mergers & Acquisitions Workshop

Class Number: 3353; Catalog Number- Law 659J, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent not okay); Contract Drafting; Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Participation in Simulated Transaction; Written Assignments; & Participation (NO EXAM)

Enrollment: 12

Description: This class is designed to provide law school students who intend to practice transactional law with some of the basic practical skills required to counsel companies with respect to business combinations. The focus of the course will be to identify and discuss the factors involved in a typical business combination, the roles of the parties and the relevant documents. The course is intended to ease the transition from law school to junior transactional associate.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Doing Deals: Transactional Law Program's Negotiations Team 

Class Number: 5779; Catalog Number- Law 880

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Profs. Ellis, Jeremy & Harrison, Chason

Prerequisite: Approved by Faculty Advisor (via tryout)

Grading Criteria: Participation (Graded on Pass/Fail Basis)

DescriptionTeam members prepare for oral negotiations, practice negotiation techniques, and draft transactional documents under the direction of one or more faculty advisors for regional, and potentially national competitions. A student selected to compete is eligible for credit in the semester in which the competition is held. The faculty advisor(s) will approve course registration and assign a grade.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Doing Deals: Venture Capital

Class Number: 3340; Catalog Number- Law 659C, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBD

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting, Deal Skills,

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course will study the business and legal issues in venture capital transactions. The course will be taught primarily through simulations.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Education Law & Policy: Education Reform at a Crossroads

Class Number: 3373; Catalog Number- Law 662, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Waldman, Randee

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class exercises and Final paper

Description: This course will survey constitutional, statutory and policy issues affecting children in our public elementary and secondary schools. An emphasis will be placed on issues that impact the children most at risk for educational failure and that contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline. Topics will include the right to an education, school discipline, special education, alternative educational programs, No Child Left Behind and high-stakes testing, the rights of homeless youth and youth in foster care, and laws designed to address bullying in our schools.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Employment Discrimination

Class Number: 3392; Catalog Number- Law 669, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Weirich, Geoff

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course will focus on the development of law and policy under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Equal Pay Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Note: This class will meet every other M/W through and including 4/17. Classes will not meet on:  1/9, 1/11, 1/16 (MLK Day), 2/13, 2/15, 2/27 and 3/1.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Employment Discrimination Lab

Class Number: 3349; Catalog Number- Law 669X, 06A

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Profs. Shultz, Chad & Prof. King, Fred

Prerequisite: Employment Discrimination or Employment Law

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Enrollment: (cap of 8 students)

Description: The class will work through an employment law case from meeting the client to a mock jury trial. The students will be divided into 2 law firms. One firm represents the Plaintiff and the other firm represents the Defendant. The classes are lead by Chad Shultz and Carlton King Jr., but this is an interactive class that encourages group discussion and student participation. The written assignments will include a demand letter (Plaintiff’s firm), a response to the demand letter (defense); summary judgment brief and reply (simplified and limited to no more than 8 pages). Each student will also participate in deposing a witness, argue the motion for summary judgment, and play a role in the trial of the case. This is a hands-on class that will allow you prosecute and defend an employment case from start to finish.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Energy Law

Class Number: 5587; Catalog Number- Law 660, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Crofton, Peter

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: The course examines state, federal and international regulation of energy markets and the development, production and distribution of energy. The course will emphasize the interrelation of energy policy with other legal and economic policy areas.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Entertainment Law

Class Number: 3294; Catalog Number- Law 720, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Sanders, Scott

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property, or Trademark Law, or Copyright Law (concurrent okay)

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course will provide an overview of the rapidly developing body of law associated with the entertainment industries concentrating in the areas of music publishing and commercial recording, live performance, literary publishing and motion pictures. The course will focus on a study of entertainment law cases, aspects of copyright law, personal rights, and negotiation of entertainment agreements.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Environmental Law

Class Number: 5588; Catalog Number- 624X

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Goldstein, Mindy

Prerequisite: Legislation & Regulation

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam; & Participation

Description: This course will focus on legal strategies to regulate and remedy environmental harms. The course is designed to prepare transactional lawyers, regulatory lawyers, government counsel and litigators, as well as students interested in specializing in environmental law. A major goal of the course is to introduce students to the analytical skills necessary to understand and work in this and many other predominantly statutory and regulatory fields. The course will therefore frequently involve analysis of methods of interpretation of statutes and regulations and analysis of the central role of administrative agencies in environmental law. The course will focus on various federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act.

*Last Updated Fall 2015

Estate Planning

Class Number: 3295; Catalog Number- Law 916, 02A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Pennell, Jeff

Prerequisite: Trusts & Estates (There are no tax course prerequisites for Estate Planning)

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam

Description: Selected problems in estate analysis and planning involving drafting of wills and trusts utilizing future interests, class gifts, powers of appointment, generation-skipping arrangements, and qualification for the marital deduction. Consideration of planning for business interests, insurance, and employee benefits also is included.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Ethics of Criminal Justice Practice 

Class Number: 3466; Catalog Number- Law 700

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Tatum, Melissa 

Prerequisite: Must be a 2L or 3L.

Grading Criteria: Participation & In-class Exam

Description: This course is designed to allow students to apply ethical rules in a criminal law context.  To learn, through interpretation and practical application of the Model Code of Conduct, how trial attorneys navigate ethics and professionalism in a courtroom setting.  Special issues and obligations of prosecutors, defense attorneys, and judges will be reviewed and discussed.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

European Union Law II

Class Number: 3455; Catalog Number- Law 620L, 001

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructors: Prof. Mickevicius & Prof. Tulibacka

Prerequisite: EU Law I recommended

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam & Participation

Description: The course examines fundamental areas of substantive law of the European Union, with particular emphasis on their practical application and on their links and parallels with U.S. law. The students will examine some of the most important recent cases decided by the Court of Justice of the EU involving U.S. corporations, including Google Spain v. Costeja on ‘the right to be forgotten’, and Microsoft v Commission concerning Microsoft’s abuse of its dominant position in the EU market. They will be able to identify and critically assess the EU approach to a number of legal and economic concepts and rules, including market integration, equality, products liability and antitrust law.

The course commences with examining the EU personal data protection regime and the right to be forgotten as defined in case of Google Spain v. Costeja. It will continue with an examination of the law and legal practice related to the European single market: free movement of persons, including the evolving concept of EU citizenship; goods; establishments and services; and capital.

A number of hours will be devoted to the complex EU antitrust law, its enforcement, and its relationship to the U.S. antitrust rules. The analysis of the European Union’s market legislation and legal practice will be completed by a class on EU consumer law, which in many ways differs from the U.S. approach to consumer protection.

Further, the students will scrutinize the European Product Liability Directive and its parallels with the U.S. products liability law.

Finally, the course will examine substantive and procedural aspects of the EU criminal law and other issues within the rapidly developing area of freedom, security, and justice, and discuss the emerging areas of the EU civil procedure, including class actions and ADR. Lectures and discussions will draw parallels with the U.S. federal and State systems.

Most classes will consist of a lecture part and an interactive seminar part where students will deal with the judgments of the Court of Justice of the European Union, hypothetical cases, resolve legal problems, and discuss ideas.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Evidence

Class Number: 3354; Catalog Number- Law 632X, 04A

MUST BE TAKEN IN THE SECOND YEAR

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Morrison, Caren (Visiting Professor- GSU Law)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: A general consideration of the law of evidence with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Coverage includes relevance, hearsay, witnesses, presumptions and burdens of proof, writings, scientific and demonstrative evidence, and privilege.

Externship Program  

Catalog Number- Law 870I-Advanced; Law 870D- Civil Litigation; Law 870F- Corporate Counsel; Law 870H-Criminal Defense; Law 870C- Govt. Counsel; Law 870E- Judicial; Law 870J- Legislative Policy; Law 870G- Prosecution; Law 870A- Public Interest; Law 870L- Small Firm.

Credits: Varies

Instructor(s): Multiple

Selection: Application process submitted to Prof. Sarah Shalf

Grading Criteria: Class Participation & Fieldwork

Description: Step outside the classroom and learn to practice law from experienced attorneys. Take the skills and principles you learn in the classroom and learn how they apply in practice. Emory Law's General Externship Program provides work experience in different types of practice (all sectors except law firms) so you can determine which suits you best and develop relationships that will continue as you begin your legal career. Students are supported in their placements by a weekly class meeting with other students in similar placements, taught by faculty with practice experience in that area, in which students have the opportunity to learn legal and professional skills they need to succeed in the externship, receive mentoring independent of their on-site supervisors, and to step back and reflect on their experience and what they are learning from it.

Our Small Firm Externship Program provides students specially interested in the small law firm practice setting with experience in specially-selected small law firms. The firms' attorneys participate with the students in our weekly class meeting, which focuses on the skills and attributes necessary to succeed in a small firm practice setting.

Students apply for externships via Symplicity in the semester prior to the externship and all placements must be preapproved. Available placements for the General program are listed on the Emory Law website, http://law.emory.edu/academics/academic-programs/externships/externship-search.html, and the currently-participating Small Firms are listed here: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/small-firm-externship-applicant-law-firm-ranking/

Warning: No student is allowed to be enrolled in more than one clinic, workshop, or externship classes (except fieldwork) in a semester.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Family Law I

Class Number: 3341; Catalog Number- Law 633, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Broyde, Michael

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course will address the problems, policies, and laws related to the formation and dissolution of the marital relationship. Among the topic covered will be marriage, divorce, child custody and other related topics.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Federal Income Tax: Corporations

Class Number: 3296; Catalog Number- Law 642, 10A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Fowler, Lynn

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax 

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: Survey of the general structure of taxation of corporations. Considers the tax issues arising from the formation, operation, liquidation, and reorganization of corporations. An important course for anyone interested in transactional law.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Federal Income Tax: Individuals

Class Number: 3398; Catalog Number- Law 640L, 08A

Credit: 4 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Brown, Dorothy 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: An introduction to federal income taxation with an emphasis on determination of income subject to taxation, which expenses are allowable deductions and whether certain income is excluded from taxation, along with the proper time for reporting items of income and deductions and which proper taxpayer should pay the tax.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken Fundamentals of Income Tax (the 3 credit course with Professor Pennell) may not take this class.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Federal Income Tax: Partnerships

Class Number: 3297; Catalog Number- Law 942, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Beaudrot, Charles 

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course examines the taxation of partnerships, joint ventures, and LLCs. We will look at the formation, financing, and operation of these entities to understand the impact the tax rules have on financial returns and investment structures. This is an essential class for those interested in venture capital, private equity, real estate, or international business transactions.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Introduction to Financial Compliance

Class Number: 5772; Catalog Number- Law 759

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Clemmons, Morgan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation (15%); & Scheduled Final Exam (85%).

Description: This course is intended for students with an interest in financial institutions and regulatory compliance, specifically those thinking about practicing in this area and who wish to prepare for jobs in the field. While corporations and industries have long faced regulatory burdens, the world of regulatory compliance by financial services companies as it relates to consumer protection is new within the last few years, is experiencing a boom, but is here to stay. Many attorneys and professionals are unprepared to understand these new rules as the CFPB works across many industries and institutions, including banks, credit unions, mortgage companies, student loan companies, auto lenders, payday loan lenders, etc. This course or program will give students a basic introduction into financial services regulatory compliance, which will be invaluable as a niche area of law. Students will familiarize themselves with basic regulations and trends in financial compliance. The course will include guest speakers from regulatory agencies, practicing attorneys, and other subject matter experts (SMEs) with advanced degrees and/or relevant compliance work experience.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Foreign Relations Law 

Class Number: 3442; Catalog Number- Law 602, 001

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Dudziak, Mary

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam 

Description: This course examines the law that regulates the conduct of American foreign relations. Topics include the distribution of foreign affairs powers between the three branches of the federal government, the war power, the treaty power, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the validity of executive agreements, the preemption of state foreign affairs activities, and the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign affairs cases.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Fulton Landlord-Tenant Workshop II

Class Number: 5995; Catalog Number- 870N 

Credit: 3 hours (each semester)

Instructor(s): Prof. Powell, Bonnie

Selection: Application process submitted thru Symplicity

Description: See Below. 

Landlord-Tenant Mediation Workshop students will mediate landlord/tenant disputes, including cases handled by the Magistrate and State courts; particularly small claim civil issues such as disputes between landlords and tenants. Assuming an agreement is reached during mediation, students will be responsible for drafting a detailed settlement agreement.

Students work under the supervision of an attorney mediating cases that deal with numerous issues of law within the court system. Prior to mediating, students will receive 28 hours of civil mediation training and will be registered as neutrals with the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution

Required Mediation Training

Training is provided by the program and will occur the first or second week in August; attendance for the entire 28 hours of training is mandatory. Training dates will be confirmed no later than June 1.

These hours may be used later in the semester to compensate for any necessary time away.  For example, if a student has to leave at 5:00 pm for an evening class, 30/45 minutes of training can be used as a filler.     

For those who need a more flexible schedule, there is also now a partnership with Dekalb County so students can mediate there as well. The hours there are a bit different and has more flexibility.

Enrollment

This is a full academic year, two-semester workshop. Students must enroll in both the fall and spring semesters. Second and third-year students may apply. An in-person interview will be scheduled with the supervising attorney.

  • Application Period: Resumes can be submitted through Symplicity at the same time externships accept resumes.
  • Required Background Check: Upon acceptance, a criminal background check by the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution will be conducted.

Class Times

  • Students must be available to go to court from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. or 12:45 to 5:45 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.
  • Weekly seminar sessions will take place at the courthouse during the semester.

*Last Updated Fall 2016

Fundamentals of Client Value

Class Number: 3501; Catalog Number- 574B 

Credit: 1 hour*

Instructor(s): Prof. Walton, Steve (Goizueta Business School)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation 

Description: The expectations that clients have of their legal advisors have fundamentally changed. Whether it is a large corporate client or a person wanting to incorporate a new business, cost, speed, accuracy, flexibility and a host of other criteria now define what “successful” legal work looks like. In the language of business, the fundamentals of client value have shifted. This shift is incredibly disruptive to the organization and delivery of legal work.  This course explores the idea of client value, how to better understand your particular client’s value, and how to begin to put in place capabilities and procedures to best deliver on client value. We will draw from the disciplines of strategy, marketing and operations to develop a practical framework to help you better drive client value.

*Please Note: The class will meet on the following days/times: February 17, 18, & 24 from 9:30am-12:30pm; and February 25 from 1:15pm-4:45pm.

*Last Updated Spring 2017.

Fundamentals of Innovation II

Class Number: 3298; Catalog Number- Law 890A, 04A

OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Morris, Nicole 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation

Description: Fundamentals of Innovation II is the second of the two-course sequence on various techniques and approaches needed to understand the innovation process. Issues explored will include patterns of technological change, identifying market and technological opportunities, competitive market analysis, the process of technology commercialization, intellectual property protection, and methods of valuing new technology.

The fall course and the companion course in the spring will provide the academic core to the student’s first year in the Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results (“TI:GER”) program and will be taught as a series of learning modules. Each module and class session is lead by a faculty or guest instructor with in-depth experience in that particular technology commercialization topic. Students will take each course as a “community of participants” and will participate on both an individual and team level. Innovation teams that are comprised of the PhD candidates, MBA and JD students, will be formed mid-semester and will participate both in in-class activities and cases, as well as in an “engaged learning” experience intended to simulate the technology commercialization process. The technology/research that will drive the innovation teams will be provided by the PhD candidates and their advisors.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

The Future of the Legal Profession

Class Number: 5695; Catalog Number- Law 574C

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Trotter, Mike

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This course will examine:

  1. Predictions concerning the future of the legal profession in America.
  2. Why have many of the predicted changes in the functioning of our legal system failed to occur, and what changes have actually occurred?
  3. Actions being taken by American law firms to become more cost-effective legal service providers.
  4. Developments in other countries focusing on the UK’s Legal Services Act of 2007 (dealing with the practice of law in England and Wales). 
  5. The development of Alternative Legal Service Providers in the United States.
  6. The expanding use of unlicensed personnel to provide legal services.
  7. How can legal services be more cost-effectively provided within our existing legal system?
  8. How can our legal system be modified to function more cost-effectively?
  9. Possible dispute resolution reforms?
  10. Restructuring the American legal system?
  11. Legal education?
  12. Looking forward

The course will also examine key developments in the practice of law that have enabled the growth in size and scope of law firms over the second half of the 20th Century, including:

  1. Reductions in the financial risks of practicing law.
  2. The reduction of restraints on the marketing of legal services.
  3. The lateral movement of lawyers among law firms and law departments.
  4. The pricing of legal services based on time spent.
  5. The increased use of personnel leverage – including utilization of unlicensed personnel to support the provision of, or to provide, legal services, and
  6. Advances in technology applicable to legal services.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Health Law

Class Number: 3380; Catalog Number- Law 736, 12A (Blakely/Grubman)

Class Number: 3405; Catalog Number- Law 736, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 hours

Instructors: Profs. Blakely, Jennifer; Grubman, Scott; & Prof. Ahdieh, Robert (online only)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: Healthcare is one of the largest sectors of the economy, and the practice of health law is growing. This course is an introduction to regulatory health law. The course will address select topics in health law related to issues of quality, access, cost, and fraud and abuse. Possible topics include: regulation of physicians and health care institutions; confidentiality; informed consent; individual and institutional obligations to provide care; discrimination in access to care; ERISA preemption and regulation; public and private health insurance structures and some of the major statutes that govern them; government powers in public health emergencies; fraud and abuse laws; and the government’s role in healthcare.

Note: The online section will meet on Mondays & Wednesdays from 6:00pm to 7:15pm ET.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Healthcare Compliance

Class Number: 3488; Catalog Number- Law 740, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 hours

Instructors: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert (online only)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: Healthcare Compliance provides an understanding of the complexities of the healthcare compliance process from practical, business, and legal perspectives. Students will become familiar with the components of an effective compliance plan and program as well as the issues that arise in the implementation and administration of a compliance plan. Discover the many roles the compliance staff fulfill in encouraging compliance with laws, regulations, and ethical principles, and gain familiarity with some of the more significant issues that arise when allegations of noncompliance come to the attention of the federal and state governments.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Legal Issues in Higher Education 

Class Number: 3451; Catalog Number- Law 665, 001

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Fowler, Paul 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Case Briefs; Class Presentation; Outline Paper; and Case Study/Final Exam.  

Description: The course has been designed to expose the student to a range of administrative challenges at the postsecondary level that entails legal and ethical implications. The course experiences should ultimately help current and prospective administrators to envision the legal dimensions of collegiate-level decision processes.  Among the topics to be discussed will be the basis from which higher education law originates, current (case, state and regulatory) law, as well as risk management and liability issues for higher education. 

*Last Updated Spring 2016

History of Church & State Relations in the West

Class Number: 5586; Catalog Number- Law 645

Credit: 3 hours (plus 1-hour optional lab)

Instructor: Prof. Witte, John Jr.

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria:  Participation & Take-home Exam

Description: This course will explore the interaction between religious and political authorities and institutions from the time of the Roman Empire until the American founding era.  We shall analyze the variety of constitutional and other legal arrangements developed to facilitate the separation, cooperation, and mutual protection of churches and states.  We shall analyze the gradual development of religious rights and liberties in the Western legal tradition, but also the systematic and oft-brutal denial of these rights to Jews, heretics, and other religious outsiders.  And we shall analyze the competition among different models of church and state that emerged repeatedly in the West, and the remarkable change introduced by the First Amendment command to disestablish religion and to protect the free exercise rights of all.

The course will focus on four periods: (1) the 4th and 5th century Roman Empire and the establishment of Christianity by Roman law, and the firm new state prohibitions on Judaism and heresy; (2) the High Middle Ages of the 11th to 13th centuries and the rise of papal and clerical power and religious establishment by the church’s canon law; (3) the Protestant Reformation movements of the sixteenth century, and the fresh rise of new religious establishments by state civil law as well as new forms of separation of church and state; and (4) the American colonial experience of the 17th and 18th centuries, and the gradual rise of constitutional principles of religious liberty that culminated in the First Amendment and state constitutions.

One Credit Hour Lab Option.  Students in this course are welcome to take a supplemental one-credit hour lab focused on “Law and Protestantism,” offered in conjunction with the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in 2017. The lab consists of 12 hours of lectures and discussion as follows:

·         Two evening lectures in February and March by Professor Witte, followed by a question/answer period

·         Attendance at 8 hours of sessions of a major international conference on “The 500th Anniversary of the Reformation” to be held at Emory on April 3-4, 2017. 

Students will write a separate pass/fail paper of 1000 words for this one credit lab.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Human Sex Trafficking

Class Number: 5697; Catalog Number- Law 624C 

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): ADAs. Racine, Dalia & Harris, Destiny

Prerequisite: Evidence

Enrollment: Limited to 14 students only!

Grading Criteria: Participation; CSEC/HT terms Presentation; Class Assignments; and A Final Trial Notebook.

Description: This course will explore two significant issues in the United States today: commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC) and human trafficking (HT). We have four principal objectives: to provide an introduction to CSEC/HT; to explain the legal definitions and processes involved in investigating and litigating CSEC/HT cases; to offer an understanding of the various dimensions of CSEC/HT through use of a thorough case study; to enable students to develop trial preparation techniques.  

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Insurance Law

Class Number: 5598; Catalog Number- Law 613, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria:  TBA

Description: Insurance Law is designed to introduce students to the basic principles governing the creation, sale and enforcement of the most common forms of insurance in the U.S. Students will be introduced to the following insurance lines: personal liability, professional liability, commercial general liability, homeowners, automobile, life and casualty and health. The peculiarities of each line will be discussed as well as the problems common to all lines: moral hazard, adverse selection, and outright fraud. The social function of insurance, as well as, historical anomalies are covered in order to give the student the broadest possible exposure to the issues lawyers confront regularly in this area of practice.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Intellectual Property 

Class Number: 3483; Catalog Number- Law 608, 001

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Bagley, Margo

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course will serve as an introduction to patent, trademark, and copyright law. The course will explore the policy and legal foundations for these areas of law and the scope of protection which each affords. The requirements for protection will be examined and compared. The framework for the administrative procedures which support the patent and trademark systems will also be discussed. In part, the course will direct attention to questions about the legitimacy of these forms of property and appropriateness of protection. The course will also explore intellectual property transactions and the ways in which they shape and facilitate the distribution, commercialization, and use of ideas, creative expression, technologies, and information.

Intellectual Property Legal Research 

**ACCELERATED COURSE

Class Number: 5696; Catalog Number- Law 657A

Credit: 1 hour

Instructor: Prof. Christian, Elizabeth 

PrerequisiteNone

Grading Criteria: In-class participation; Small research assignments; & A Final Project.   

Description: Intellectual Property Law Research will introduce research methods and resources for intellectual property law research.  Students will become familiar with intellectual property law research through lectures and by practical applications through in-class exercises, research homework exercises, and a final project.  Topics will include research in the areas of patents, copyrights, and trademarks with an emphasis on practicing law in these areas.

Intellectual Property Law Research will be a 1 credit, graded course, meeting once a week for a two-hour time period using the accelerated class model.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

International Business Transactions

Class Number: 5585; Catalog Number- Law 730, 02A (Dean)

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Dean, Peter 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course will be a survey of practical issues that arise in cross-border transactions, including both outbound and inbound (from a US perspective) trade and investment transactions. We will discuss issues that affect transactions involving international trading of goods, project development and acquisitions. Topics will include letters of credit, international trade terms such as INCOTERMS, joint venture agreements, and international transfer of technology. We will also cover some selected aspects of government regulation of international trade and investment.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

International Human Rights

Class Number: 3477; Catalog Number- Law 690L, 001

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Van der Vyver, Johan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam or Take-home Paper

Description: This course focuses on international concerns for the upholding of human rights standards in legal systems of the world. It defines the concept of human rights, and distinguishes different categories of human rights that have developed over the years, namely (a) natural rights of the individual; (b) civil and political rights; (c) economic, social and cultural rights; and (d) solidarity rights. General problems relating to the theoretical basis of human rights will come under the spotlight in this section, including the universality and relativity of human rights, and the right to self-determination of peoples.

The course further deals with mechanisms for the protection and promotion of international human rights at three distinct levels: (a) globally, under auspices of the United Nations Organization, with emphasis on the binding effect of the human rights standards enunciated in the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, promotion and protection of those rights by the Human Rights Council, and the proclamation and enforcement of certain categories of rights in virtue of international conventions and covenants sponsored by the United Nations; (b) regionally, in Europe under auspices of the Council of Europe, the European Union, and the Helsinki Accord, in the Americas under auspices of the Organization of American States; and in Africa under auspices of the African Union; and (c) thematically, under auspices of specialized agencies such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) and UNESCO.

When dealing with the promotion and protection of human rights under auspices of the United Nations, special attention will be given to the question whether or not the provisions in the U.N. Charter dealing with human rights are self-executing in the United States, and decisions of the Human Rights Council dealing with, for example, the defamation of a religion, and human rights violations committed by Israel in the West Bank and in Gaza. We have also singled out particular rights and freedoms for closer scrutiny, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion or belief, and the international protection of rights of the child.

The section on the Council of Europe pays special attention to the doctrine of a margin of appreciation developed by the European Court of Human Rights, which affords to High Contracting Parties a first bite at the cherry to decide whether circumstances exist in their respective countries that would warrant limitations to be imposed on particular rights or freedoms enunciated in the European Convention for the Protection of Basic Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, and to the doctrine of positive obligations, which places on High Contracting Parties a duty to protect persons under their jurisdiction against violations of their rights by the State and by non-State actors. It further focuses on a selection of judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, such as those relating to torture, sexual orientation, and extradition constraints (the latter involving the United States).

The section on the Inter-American system for the protection of human rights singles out decisions of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights that condemned the United States for not observing basic principles of the Inter-American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man of 1948, for example ones that dealt with racial discrimination in the sentencing of convicted criminals, the death penalty, abortions, and non-compliance by the United States with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations.

The latter set of cases will also bring into contention three judgments of the International Court of Justice condemning the United States for non-compliance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and responses from the U.S. Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court of Germany to those judgments. The enforcement of international human rights in federal courts of the United States in cases such as Medéllin v.

Texas and in virtue of the Alien Torts Statute and Article 1, Section 8, Paragraph 10 of the U.S. Constitution places the Vienna Convention judgments in a broader perspective.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

International Humanitarian Law

Class Number: 3355; Catalog Number- Law 676, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Van der Vyver, Johan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam or Take-home Paper

Description: September 11th, the war in Afghanistan and in Iraq, and the status of Afghani captives being held at Guantanamo Bay; the testing and stockpiling of weapons of mass destruction; the violent conflict in Israel and Palestine, and in Libya; and attempts to establish an Islamic State (ISIS) in Syria and Iraq are all matters that come within the range of international humanitarian law: the law of armed conflict. International humanitarian law applies to and in times of armed conflict and differentiates between international armed conflicts and armed conflicts not of an international character. The war in Bosnia/Herzegovina and jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) illustrate the complexities attending that distinction. The U.S. Supreme Court decided in the Hamdan Case that the “war against terror” is an armed conflict not of an international character because it is not a war between States. This view is at odds with the jurisprudence of the ICTY and the International Criminal Court (ICC). It is also extremely difficult to establish precisely under what conditions an internal uprising would be considered an armed conflict for the purposes of international humanitarian law.

The rules of international humanitarian law fall into two main categories:

(a) the ius ad bellum (the law relating to armed conflict): under what circumstances is the taking up of arms to resolve an international or internal dispute legitimate, and when would it constitute the international crime of aggression?

(b) the ius in bello (the law applying in times of war), which comprises two main subject matters:

The rules regulating the means and methods of conducting hostilities (what weapons may be used, and what persons or objects may be targeted);

How must belligerent parties treat persons and objects not engaged in, or used for, actual combat, such as the wounded or sick members of the armed forces in the field; the wounded, sick or shipwrecked members of the armed forces at sea; prisoners of war; and civilians.

Under (a), the course will explore the legitimacy of, for example, wars of liberation, the right to self-defense, and humanitarian intervention, with special emphasis on the war in Iraq, the Israeli offensive in Gaza, the use of armed force in Libya, and the current bombing campaign in Syria and Iraq. Under (b)(i), questions such as the legality of the threat or use of a wide spectrum of armament, ranging from dumdum bullets to nuclear, bacteriological and chemical weapons, as well as legitimate/illegitimate targets of an armed attack, will be considered. Under (b)(ii), matters such as the treatment of prisoners of war and of the wounded and sick soldiers, and the protection of civilians and civilian objects, including cultural property, in times of war will come under the spotlight.

Particular problems that have emerged from recent judgments of the ICC and of the Supreme Court of Israel include the conscription and enlistment, and the use in actual combat, of children under the age of 15 years, and the use of a human shield to protect legitimate military targets from an armed attack.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

International Humanitarian Law Clinic

Class Number: 3333; Catalog Number- Law 676C, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Blank, Laurie

Prerequisites/Co-requisitesInternational Law; International Humanitarian Law; International Criminal Law; International Human Rights; Transitional Justice; National Security Law

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance 

Enrollment: By application

Description: The International Humanitarian Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to do real-world work on issues relating to international law and armed conflict, counter-terrorism, national security, transitional justice and accountability for atrocities. Students work directly with organizations, including international tribunals, militaries, and non-governmental organizations, under the supervision of the Director of the IHL Clinic, Professor Laurie Blank.

The IHL Clinic also includes a weekly class seminar with lecture and discussion introducing students to the foundational framework of and contemporary issues in international humanitarian law (otherwise known as the law of armed conflict).

*Last Updated Spring 2017

International Law

Class Number: 3299; Catalog Number- Law 732, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. An-Na’im, Abdullah 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: The objective of this course is to introduce students to the general principles of Public International Law from a critical contemporary perspective, and to discuss the challenges to the structural and institutional limitations of that state-centric legal order in its global political context. The underlying theme will also include the implications of global transformations in the actors and processes of the rule of law in international relations.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

International Sales & Commercial Arbitration

Class Number: 6599; Catalog Number- Law 609A, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: International Sales and Commercial Arbitration provides an overview of the law governing international sales of goods and international commercial arbitration, focusing primarily on the U.N. Convention on the International Sale of Goods, the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration, and the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Introduction to the American Legal System 

NOTE: OPEN ONLY TO FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS & JM STUDENTS

Class Number: 3403; Catalog Number- Law 570A

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Final Exam

JM Description: This course covers the Constitutional principles and governmental structures that shape the American legal system.  It examines the structure of the U.S. judicial system and basic principles of legal reasoning.  The course also incorporates a series of guest lectures in the primary areas of first-year legal study (contracts, torts, etc.).

LLM Description: This course covers the constitutional principles, history, and governmental structures that shape the American legal system.  Designed for lawyers trained outside of the United States, the course introduces basic principles of federalism, common-law reasoning, and an overview of the primary areas of first-year legal study.

*Last Updated Fall 2016.

Introduction to Law & Economics

Class Number: 3378; Catalog Number- Law 628Y, 08A

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s):  Prof. Shepherd, Joanna

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Enrollment: 80

Description: This course introduces students to the economic analysis of the law. Because economics provides a tool for studying how legal rules affect the way people behave, understanding economic analysis of legal problems has become an important part of a lawyer's education. The ability to predict the effects of legal rules helps the practicing lawyer furnish advice and make arguments before courts. It is also a prerequisite for the evaluation of legal policy. Over the last twenty-five years, the economic approach has grown in importance in academia as well as in legal and judicial practice. The course will explore several economic methods and concepts and apply them to illuminate and critique familiar areas of law, including criminal law, torts, contracts, property, and civil procedure. There are no prerequisites for this course; a background in economics is not necessary (or even very helpful).

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Introduction to Legal Advocacy (ILA) formerly LWRAP II

Catalog Number- Law 535B, 

Credits: 2 hours

Instructors:  Profs. Carroll, Kirk, Mathews, Parrish, Romig, Schwartz, Pinder, Koster

Prerequisite:  ILARC (or an equivalent course)

Grading Criteria: Class assignments 

Description:  This course builds on skills presented in ILARC and introduces students to the process of effectively employing persuasive strategies in both written and oral formats.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Islamic Law

Class Number: 3465; Catalog Number- Law 627, 001

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. An-Na’im, Abdullah

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Three 1500 - 2000 word papers, due by 5:00 pm, Fridays Jan 27, Feb 24 and March 31Attendance is required. Missing five classes without the consent of the Instructor will be penalized in the final grade. An additional grade penalty will be imposed for missing more than five classes.

Description: The objective of this course is to introduce students to the nature, sources and techniques of Islamic Law (Shari‘a- which is the normative system of Islam- the term Islamic Law is misleading), and its main concepts, principles, and rules. Class discussions will also focus on the relationship between Shari‘a and modern legal systems, as well as its social and cultural impact on present Islamic societies.

Following a discussion of the nature, sources and early development of Shari‘a, we will review the main substantive aspects of this jurisprudential tradition in the fields of property and transactions, family law, criminal law, constitutional law and inter-communal (i.e. international) law. The last part of the course will examine the relationship between Shari‘a and the legal systems of the Islamic Republics of Iran and Pakistan as case studies. We will also discuss recent “Arab Spring” constitutional developments in Tunisia and Morocco.

Required Texts: 

-        An-Na‘im, ISLAMIC COURSE MATERIALS 2016, Emory Law School Copy Center

-        Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na‘im, TOWARD AN ISLAMIC REFORMATION (Syracuse University Press, 1990)

-        Jan Michiel Otto, Editor, SHARIA INCORPORATED (Leiden University Press Academic), 2011.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Jewish Law

Class Number: 3376; Catalog Number- Law 664, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Broyde, Michael 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper or Take-Home Exam

Description: This course will survey the principles Jewish (or Talmudic) law uses to address difficult legal issues and will compare these principles to those that guide legal discussions in America. In particular, this course will focus on issues raised by advances in medical technology such as surrogate motherhood, artificial insemination, and organ transplant. Through discussion of these difficult topics many areas of Jewish law will be surveyed.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Judicial Behavior: Judicial Decision Making 

Class Number: 5771; Catalog Number- Law 844A

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Nash, Johnathan 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation & Take-home Final Exam

Description: What decides legal cases? One obvious answer, and a lawyer’s reflexive answer is, the law. Social scientists, however, have sought to explain judicial decisionmaking by reference to a variety of non-legal factors, including judges' personal characteristics, their caseloads, and their relationships with each other. The social scientific study of courts raises a host of interesting questions.  For example, on the Supreme Court, does it matter which Justice is assigned to write the opinion, or will the majority (or the whole Court) bargain to the same outcome anyway? If opinion assignment matters to outcomes, how might judges' choices about the division of labor influence the content of the law? How do higher courts ensure that lower courts comply with their decisions?  This course that will examine these questions and many like them. This course will marry the relevant social science literature and the questions it raises to a set of normative problems within the law itself.  There will be a take-home final examination for this course.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Juvenile Defender Clinic

Class Number: 3300; Catalog Number- Law 699C

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Waldman, Randee 

Prerequisite: Priority will be given to students who have taken or are currently enrolled in: Kids in Conflict with the Law; Juvenile Law or Family Law 2; Criminal Procedure; and Evidence.

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance 

Description: The Juvenile Defender Clinic is an in-house legal clinic dedicated to providing holistic legal representation for children charged with delinquency and status offenses.   Student attorneys represent clients in juvenile court and provide legal advocacy, in school discipline, special education and mental health matters, when such advocacy is derivative of a client's juvenile court case.  

Under the supervision of the clinic's director, Randee Waldman, student attorneys are responsible for handling all aspects of client representation. While in the clinic, JDC students will: Establish an attorney-client relationship with their client(s); Direct case strategy determinations; Investigate allegations; Interview witnesses; Negotiate dispositions and plea agreements; Prepare and litigate motions, and Try cases.

Students are also encouraged to engage in research and participate in juvenile justice policy development.

Applications are accepted via Symplicity or e-mail to professor Waldman prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

*Last updated Spring 2017

Law & Economics of Antitrust

Class Number: 5582; Catalog Number- Law 628A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Volokh, A.

Prerequisite: None (Although a comfort level w/high school level Algebra is a big plus).

Grading CriteriaSeveral problem sets (quantitative problems and short essays) over the course of the semester; no final exam; nothing due after the last day of classes

Description: This course surveys the law and economics of antitrust, with a brief foray into regulated industries. We will cover competition, monopoly, oligopoly, public enterprises, penalties, market structure, empirical methods, vertical intrabrand restraints, horizontal mergers, dominant-firm exclusionary conduct, and concerted exclusionary conduct.

If you have some background in economics, so much the better. If you don’t, don’t worry: It’s not required for this class. We’ll learn all the economics we need to know on the fly. There will be plenty of math, but the math we’ll be doing in class won’t be highly technical. The most important thing will be to understand the intuition, understand some simple graphs, and do some basic algebra and numerical problems.


*Last Updated Spring 2017

Law & Protestantism

Class Number: 5769; Catalog Number- Law 645B

Credit: 1 Hour

Note: The timing of the class which will be announced at the beginning of the semester.  Two noon-time lectures on Mondays or Wednesday (late February and early March) during the M/W (12-2) community activities hour, and participation in the conference April 3 and 4. 

Instructor(s): Prof. Witte, John

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: 1000-word essay (Pass/Fail)

Description: This course is built around the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation.  It focuses on the legal and political consequences of the revolutionary religious changes born of the sixteenth-century Reformation, which broke into Lutheran, Anglican, Calvinist, and Anabaptist branches.   Each of these four Protestant movements helped to introduce striking new forms of legal theory and constitutional order, new platforms of rights and liberties, and new laws of marriage and family life, schooling and education, charity and social welfare.  Many of these legal and political reforms introduced during the Reformation remained at the core of the Western legal tradition until well into the twentieth century.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Law and Religion Practicum

ClassNumber:  5583; Catalog Number- 708, PRAC

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Goldfeder, Mark

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Ask Professor

Description: Ask Professor

*Last Updated Spring 

Law & Public Health

Class Number: 3304; Catalog Number- Law 736A, 04A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kocher, Prof. Ghosh, & Prof. Hoyt

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Based on a combination of attendance, classroom participation, and take-home exam/paper

Description: Law and public health are tightly intertwined.  Law students can benefit from an improved understanding of the legal principles and laws underlying the complex and cross-disciplinary field of public health practice in the United States. This course surveys law as it defines public health and is used by local, state, and federal government agencies as a tool to address contemporary public health problems in the United States.  The course features a cross-disciplinary emphasis on the link between both the law and science of public health practice.  The course specifically addresses foundational sources for public health law in the United States, including constitutional, statutory, regulatory, and case law.  In addition, this course provides an examination of controlling law and emerging legal issues associated with selected topics drawn from bioterrorism, natural disasters, and other public health emergencies; public health surveillance and outbreak investigations; public health research and health information; special populations (including, for example, persons with mental disabilities, prisoners, children, and homeless populations); and key public health topical areas, such as vaccination; food-borne diseases; tobacco use-related problems; and injuries.  Topics are covered through a combination of lecture and classroom discussion of assigned readings.  Readings are assigned from the required text, selected cases, and articles published in the medical, public health, and other scientific literature.  In addition to the listed course instructors, other instructors will include a rich array of expert guest lecturers from the practice community.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Leadership for Lawyers

**ACCELERATED COURSE

Class Number: 5584; Catalog Number- 576, SHRT

Credit: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Topping, Peter

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Ask Professor

Description: Ask Professor

*Last Updated Spring 

Legal Profession
  • Class Number: 3301; Catalog Number- Law 747, 12A (Terrell)
  • Class Number: 363; Catalog Number- Law 747, 12B (Goldfeder)

STUDENTS CONSIDERING A LITIGATION FIELD PLACEMENT IN THEIR THIRD YEAR ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO TAKE LEGAL PROFESSION IN THEIR SECOND YEAR.

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Terrell, Tim & Prof. Goldfeder, Mark

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: The rules and principles of professional ethics, other regulatory constraints on lawyers, the elements of malpractice liability and the values of professionalism.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Media Law

Class Number: 3468; Catalog Number- Law 722, 001

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Counts, Cynthia 

Prerequisite: None 

Grading Criteria: Attendance & Participation (10%); Final Exam or Writing Assignment(s) (90%). 

Description: This class will explore legal issues that are particularly relevant to newspapers, radio and television stations, web operators, and bloggers. Topics include tort liability for defamation and invasion of privacy, prior restraint, the right of the media and public to access government documents, the protection of confidential sources, intellectual property protection for media content, and use of copyrighted material in news broadcasts.  The course will also examine the legality of undercover reporting, deception, and the use of hidden cameras.  The class will analyze and discuss the practical implications of these principles in real-world First Amendment and media cases that were recently litigated.  In class discussions, students will identify, analyze, and critique the constitutional, statutory, and common-law legal doctrines that apply to media law cases, and we will study how those doctrines originated, have evolved, and will continue to change. Among other things, students will analyze and discuss in depth key cases that show how the law and protections for the media have developed and will gain a greater understanding of how the law impacts news reporting today. In addition to the assigned reading, we will discuss current media and First Amendment cases that are raised in the news throughout the course of the semester.  Your grade will be determined based on participation and a take-home final exam or writing assignment, such as a motion for summary judgment in favor of a reporter and media company.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Mediation Advocacy

Note: **Short Course** Four weeks, Starting week of 1/9, with two 3-hour sessions each week, and one additional Friday afternoon session, during the four weeks.

Class Number: 5590; Catalog Number- Law 606

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Gmurzyńska, Ewa

Prerequisite: None 

Grading Criteria: Participation (50%); & Take-home Exam (50%).

Description:Mediation is an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) method that has become an essential part of legal systems. Its institutionalization, as well as widespread application - particularly in many civil cases - requires lawyers to have a practical and theoretical understanding of it. In Georgia, like a number of other states and federal courts, many cases are required to go to mediation before they go to trial. Mediation is also becoming a popular tool to resolve disputes in other countries, as well as in the international arena, particular in commercial disputes, and thus it is becoming a universal method for the resolution of many types of conflicts.  Mediation is also an important part of effective legal representation - requiring a problem-solving approach to conflicts.

The course will make students familiar with US mediation rules and processes, as well as the international legal framework and law of mediation, including in the European Union. Students will study mediation from a comparative perspective, including differences between court proceedings, arbitration, negotiation, and mediation, and with regard to the distinct role of a mediator, as opposed to a judge or arbitrator. The course will explore the mediation process from different perspectives - particularly parties, advocates, and mediators. During the course, students will discuss the use of mediation by lawyers, as well as the role of lawyers in mediation.  Emphasis will be put on effective advocacy in mediation. Students will have an opportunity to practice effective communication skills and mediation role-playing. Teaching techniques including class discussion, presentation of video clips, skills exercises, and mediation role-playing will be utilized, which will require active participation by students.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Mergers & Acquisitions

Class Number: 3490; Catalog Number- Law 636A, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: Mergers and Acquisitions is an essential course for students who are interested in the corporate law field. The course explores legal issues related to mergers and acquisitions. Topics covered include acquisition structures and mechanics, shareholder voting and appraisal rights, board fiduciary duties, federal securities laws requirements, anti-takeover defenses, tax issues, and antitrust considerations.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

National Security Law

Class Number: 3399; Catalog Number- Law 652, 10A

Class Number: 5602; Catalog Number- Law 652, GRAD ((Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only)

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Profs. Blank, Laurie & Ahdieh, Robert (Online)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course surveys the framework of domestic and international laws that authorize and restrain the pursuit of the U.S. government’s national security policies. Central issues include the sources, foundation and structure of national security law; the participants in the national security system, their constitutional roles, and the nature of power sharing among branches of government; and the law applicable to specific national security issues such as the use of military force, the activities of the intelligence community, and counter-terrorism activities.

Online DescriptionNational Security: Counterterrorism is an in-depth look at counterterrorism in the United States. Examines the competing conceptions and definitions of terrorism at the national level and the institutions and processes designed to execute the national security on terrorism. Includes the study of the balance between national security interests and civil liberties found in the following topical areas: relevant Supreme Court decisions, legislative provisions in response to acts of terrorism, operational counter-terrorism considerations (including targeted killing), intelligence gathering (including interrogations), policy recommendations, the use of military tribunals or civil courts in trying suspected terrorists, the emerging law regarding enemy combatants and their detention, and the arguable need for new self-defense doctrines at the global level.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

National Security Law Research

**ACCELERATED COURSE MEETS IN SECOND HALF OF SEMESTER

Class Number: 5701; Catalog Number- Law 657B

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor: Prof. Glon, Christina 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation & Final Project.

Enrollment: 16 students

Description: National Security Law Research will offer an introduction to a few of the many statutes, agencies and regulations that operate to secure and protect our homeland.  Using statutes such as the Homeland Security Act or the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act, this class will examine how statutes and regulations work together to detect and prevent threats to the United States through agencies such as the CIA, the DOJ, the Treasury, and the DHS.  Research exercises will be designed to help cultivate a thorough understanding of the interplay between statutes and regulations as well as allow students to develop appropriate research strategies for a variety of homeland security issues 

National Security Law Research will be a 1 credit, graded course, meeting once a week for a two-hour time period using the accelerated class model.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Negotiations
  • Class Number: 3302; Law 656, 06A (Athans)  
  • Class Number: 3303; Law 656, 06B (Eldridge)
  • Class Number: 3472; Law 656, 06C (Lytle-Perry)  

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Athans, Prof. Eldridge, & Prof. Lytle-Perry

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class preparation/participation and written assignment – No Exam

Note: COURSE NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE LAW SCHOOL OR NEGOTIATIONS IN THE BUSINESS SCHOOL

Description: This hands-on skills course will explore the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating settlements in both a litigation and a transactional context. The objectives of the course will be to develop proficiency in a variety of negotiation techniques as well as a substantive knowledge of the theory and practice, or the art and science of negotiations. Each week during class, students will negotiate fictitious clients' positions, sometimes proceeded by a lecture and followed by critique and comparison of results with other students. Each problem will be designed to illustrate particular negotiation strategies as well as highlight selected professional and ethical issues. Preparation for class will include development of a negotiation strategy, reflective written memoranda required.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Patent Litigation

Class Number: 6018; Catalog Number- Law 754A, 003

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Holbrook, Tim

Prerequisite: Patent Law or IP

Grading Criteria: Participation & Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionThis course explores the strategies and contours of patent litigation in federal district court chronologically, starting with jurisdiction, strategic decisions in where to file, and choice of law. The class will then proceed through the filing of the complaint, discovery, and motions practice.  The course then explores advanced issues in proving patent infringement, including divided infringement, ANDA litigation, and extraterritorial infringement. WE will explore advanced issues of proving invalidity , along with other defenses, such as inequitable conduct and patent misuse.  There will also be an introduction to the America Invents Act provisions and discussions of alternative venues, such as the International Trade Commission and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board. Students will work in groups of 3-4 students to prepare homework assignments.  Each group will also argue either a Markman hearing or a summary judgment hearing based on the problem in the book.  There will also be a final, written in-class exam.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Personal Income Tax

Class Number: 3485; Catalog Number- Law 640X (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Ask Professor 

Description: Personal Income Tax is a study of the federal law governing the taxation of individuals. Students will learn the definition of income, the assignment of income, and what rates apply in a variety of tax scenarios facing individuals.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Privacy Law: Data & Drones in the Digital Age

Class Number: 5591; Catalog Number- Law 672, CRSL

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Cloud, Morgan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: No Final Exam

EnrollmentLimited to 11 students!

Description: The course will examine U.S. law governing informational and spatial privacy rights, including any restrictions they impose upon actions by both government and private actors.  The course will focus on three general topics:  (1)  Constitutional and statutory rules defining the scope of the legal right to privacy in the United States, focusing upon the Fourth Amendment and the concept of the reasonable expectation of privacy, and upon federal laws regulating access to electronic created, stored, and transmitted data.  (2) How contemporary commercial activities affect individuals’ privacy rights and expectations. (3) The commercial impetus for the expansive use of emerging drone technologies, the impact of this development upon notions of spatial privacy, and constitutional and statutory that may serve to regulate the use of these new systems.

Three examples of the specific topics covered in the course are:  (1)  Government efforts to gather both the metadata and the contents of electronic messages, including phone calls, emails, and text messages.  The NSA programs revealed by Edward Snowden are will be included in these materials.  (2)  Corporate efforts to gather data about users, to mine that data for commercially useful information, and to sell it to other entities.  How companies like Facebook and Google gather and profit from the user data they gather will part of this discussion.  (3)  Private sector responses to government requests (or demands) for voluntary data sharing.  Apple’s refusal to provide the FBI with its encryption keys, and the major telecom companies’ active participation in NSA data gathering, exemplify this topic.

*Note Class meets on Wednesdays from 3:00pm to 6:00pm in the Goizueta School of Business, see OPUS for exact location.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Professional Narrative in Practice

Class Number: 3498; Catalog Number- Law 574X

Credit: 1 hour

Instructor: Prof. Carlson, Sarah

Prerequisite: Instructor/Department Consent 

Grading Criteria: TBA

DescriptionProfessional Narrative in Practice will help students develop their professional "story" through the creation of job search materials, graded exercises, and small-group interaction in class.  In addition, the course will include a large component aimed at assisting students with an international background or interest, and will address the cultural challenges of searching for a job and practicing law in a foreign country.  The course will be open to students who have secured (or are actively pursuing) a position as a law clerk, legal intern, or summer associate in a country other than their home country.  This course will require that students complete a legal internship and a submit a post-internship personal assessment and evaluation.  Students are eligible for one pass/fail credit.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Religion, Culture and Law in Comparative Practice

Class Number: 3457; Catalog Number- Law 711, 001

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ludsin, Hallie

Prerequisites: None

Grading: Take-home Exam & Short Weekly Assignments

Description: Debates rage worldwide over what role religion and culture should play in law and governance and whether granting them a role conflicts with democratic principles. Increasingly, religious and ethnic groups are demanding that religious and cultural practices form the basis of the legal system or, at the very least, a separate legal system governing only their members. Western policymakers are finding it difficult to respond to these claims. While they see them as possibly antithetical to the principles of tolerance and equality built into liberal democratic theory, there is something uncomfortable about rejecting these demands when they come from a majority of a population or from a minority group that has suffered severe discrimination. This course will explore the issues that arise in the debates about the appropriate role for religion and culture in democratic governance. It will examine different models for incorporating religion and culture into law as well as at models that wholly reject this incorporation using case studies from the US, Europe, Asia and Africa.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Roman Law

Class Number: 3479; Catalog Number- Law 739, 001

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Domingo, Rafael  

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam

Description: In the thousand years between the Law of the Twelve Tables (451 BC) and Justinian's massive Corpus Iuris Civilis (530 AD), the Romans developed the most sophisticated and comprehensive secular legal system of antiquity.  Roman law is still at the heart of the civil law tradition of the European Continent and some of its former colonies in the Americas, Asia, and Africa, and it was instrumental in the development of international law, the church’s canon law, and the common law tradition.  The Roman lawyers created new legal concepts, ideas, rules, and mechanisms that are still applied in the most Western legal systems.

Specifically designed for American law students without a civil law or canon law background, this course introduces the Roman legal system in its social, political, and economic context. The course will cover the fundamental topics of private law (persons, property and inheritance, and obligations); the revival of Roman law in the Middle Ages; and the current impact of Roman law in the era of globalization.   No knowledge of Roman history or of Latin is required, and all materials will be in English translation.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Secured Transactions

Class Number: 3404; Catalog Number- Law 713, GRAD (Online Only Available to JM & LLM w/approval Students)

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Prerequisite(s): None

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description:Secured Transactions is a study of personal and commercial financing by loans and credit sales under agreements creating security interests in the debtors’ personal property (Article 9 of the UCC and relevant provisions of the Bankruptcy Code).

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Securities: Brokers/Dealers

Class Number: 3400; Catalog Number- Law 673, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Terry, Bob

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Ask Professor 

Description: This course is intended to be a follow-up course to the Securities Regulation course, which covers registration of new securities issues, disclosure and anti-fraud issues, and the coverage of securities laws. This course approaches securities regulation of the standpoint of the intermediaries between the issuers and purchaser, broker-dealers, and investment advisers. It is intended to provide an academic foundation of relevant law, as well as practical information also relevant to a law practice in the area.

Much of the course will focus on the regulatory scheme and activities of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), a self-regulatory body which is the principal day-to-day regulator of the broker-dealer industry. FINRA is the entity with which most broker-dealers and their counsel will typically interact with regard to most regulatory matters.

In addition, the course will look at investment advisers, a rapidly growing piece of the securities industry. An investment adviser is regulated either by the SEC or by state regulators, depending upon its size. Investment advisers are subject to a completely separate regulatory regime, although there are many examples of overlap with broker-dealer regulatory issues since many firms, or their affiliates, are dually registered.

The interplay between the two regulatory schemes has been the focus of much discussion and legislative and regulatory activity over the past fifteen years, including several parts of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Finally, the course will provide insight into practical considerations of regulatory interaction, in both routine settings as well as enforcement matters.

In addition to private practice, graduating students with an interest in securities might find opportunities with brokerage firms, regulators, and public corporations. The combination of the Securities Regulation course and this course should provide graduating students a thorough overview of most of the issues they might see if they enter into a securities-related practice. 

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Securities Regulation

Class Number: 3480; Catalog Number- Law 667, 001

Class Number: 5603; Catalog Number- Law 667, GRAD (Online Only Available to JM & LLM w/approval Students)

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, George; & Prof. Ahdieh, Robert (Online only)

Prerequisite: Business Associations 

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: A study of federal and state regulation of the issue, distribution, and transfer of securities. Explores the availability of exemptions from registration and the duties of participants in these securities transactions to comply with anti-fraud regulations. Some time is spent on the growing literature appraising securities regulation.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Online Description: Securities Regulation examines how the stock market and other securities markets are regulated in the United States. The primary focus is on the Securities Act of 1933 and, to a lesser extent, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course covers how companies raise capital through IPOs and other offerings, including private placements, and the complicated regulatory framework that applies to this important engine of corporate and economic growth. The course takes an in-depth look at insider trading rules while evaluating the disclosure requirements that apply when companies decide to sell stock or debt, or to go public. Appropriate for aspiring corporate litigators and transactional corporate lawyers and anyone interested in learning about the federal regulation of securities.

*Lat Updated Spring 2017

Special Topics in Technology Commercialization II

Class Number: 3330; Catalog Number- Law 892, 04A

Note: OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Morris, Nicole 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation 

Description: Special Topics in Technology Commercialization provides students with an opportunity to apply what has been learned in the Fundamentals of Innovation I and II courses. Students will work in the teams formed during the first year to continue work on the PhD team member’s technology. Students will also work on a project with the Advanced Technology Development Center (commonly known as ATDC) or Venture Lab.  

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Specialized Trial Courts & Other Alternatives to Traditional Criminal Justice 

Class Number: 5779; Catalog Number- Law 977

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shomade, Salmon

Prerequisite: None (Must be 2L or 3L). 

Grading CriteriaClass Participation (40%); & Take-home Final (60%).

DescriptionThis course is about specialized or problem-solving courts such as drug courts, mental health courts, domestic violence courts, and community courts.  The course will trace the genesis of traditional trial courts, explore the evolution of specialized trial courts, and examine the major differences between the traditional and specialized courts.  Given their popularity and influence, drug courts will be fully studied and special attention paid to their origins, development, dominance, and how these courts might be changing the criminal justice landscape.  The course will also assess how other alternatives to traditional criminal courts might or might not be changing the U.S. criminal justice overall.  Toward the end of the semester, students will get the opportunity to speculate on the future of the U.S. criminal justice system and design potential changes for improving it.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Sports Law

Class Number: 5600; Catalog Number- Law 696  (Online Only Available to JM/ & LLM w/approval Students)

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Prerequisite(s): None

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: Sports Law considers issues in both intercollegiate and professional sports with an emphasis on constitutional law; tort and criminal law; antitrust, labor law, and other issues of law in the field of sports, such as considerations of Title IX, drug testing, violence, and the role of agents.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

State Law Legal Research 

Class Number: 3452; Catalog Number- Law 657F

Credit: 1 hour

Note: ACCELERATED COURSE- First half of the semester (January 2017- February 2017)

Instructor: Prof. Sneed, Thomas

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Homework Assignments; & a Final Project

Description: The concept for this class is to focus on 3-4 of the states to which the majority of our students locate to practice, with Georgia, New York, Florida, Washington D.C. (and the states surroundings the District) and California being the primary focus.  The methods for researching primary law (cases, statutes, and regulations) for each state would be discussed, along with an examination of the secondary sources and governmental resources unique to each jurisdiction.  The class would feature in-class activities, homework assignments re-enforcing the research skills examined in class and a final project comparing jurisdictions.

State Law Legal Research will be a 1 credit, graded course, meeting once a week for a two-hour time period using the accelerated class model.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Tax Controversies

Class Number: 3377; Catalog Number- Law 641, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Craft, Shannon (Loechel)

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax

Grading: Paper & Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course will focus on the resolution of federal tax controversies through both administrative procedures and litigation. Specifically, we will consider filing requirements, audit procedures, administrative appeals, deficiencies, assessments, including termination and jeopardy assessments, penalties, interest, and the statute of limitations. Additionally, we will take a practical approach to problems and considerations arising in the litigation of cases before the U.S. Tax Court, District Court, and the Court of Federal Claims, including jurisdictional, procedural, and evidentiary issues. We will examine the choice of forum, pleadings, discovery, privileges, and tax trial practice. Finally, we will discuss summons enforcement litigation, civil collection, levy and distraint, and the tax lien and its priorities.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

The First Amendment

Class Number: 5596; Catalog Number- Law 601;

Class Number: 3493; Catalog Number- Law 601C, GRAD (Ahdieh-Online/JM & LLM w/approval Students Only) 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Arthur, Tom; Prof. Ahdieh, Robert (online only)

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I 

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam 

DescriptionThis course presents a broad overview of the theory and doctrine of freedom of speech under the First Amendment.  After beginning with the seminal opinions of Justices Holmes and Brandeis that launched modern American free speech jurisprudence, we will consider contemporary free speech doctrine including the Court's “categorical” approach, content and viewpoint discrimination, levels of scrutiny, speech compulsions, and expressive association.  Specific areas of study will include incitement, threats, obscenity, commercial speech, defamation, restrictions on student speech, and campaign finance regulation, among others.

*Last Updated 2017

Online Description: First Amendment examines the legal doctrines, theories, and arguments arising out of the free speech and religion clauses of the First Amendment. The course is designed to be an intersession/accelerated and includes synchronous, interactive classes, online quizzes, and discussion boards, as well as several documentaries that Professor Metzloff produced about leading First Amendment cases, which students will watch on their own. The class will meet Tuesday, January 3 thru Saturday, January 7 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm ET.

Online GradingCriteria: Final Exam on January 9th. 

*Last Updated Spring 2017

The Fourteenth Amendment in Historical Perspective

Class Number: 5703; Catalog Number- Law 825A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Dinner, Deborah

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I preferred 

EnrollmentLimited to 50 Students

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: This course investigates the scope and meaning of race equality, sex equality, and implied fundamental rights under the Reconstruction Amendments.  We pay particular attention to the historical development of the Fourteenth Amendment’s liberty and equality guarantees and to contemporary constitutional controversies including affirmative action, same-sex marriage, and abortion.  We ask normative questions regarding constitutional doctrine:  For example, which forms of discrimination does, or should, “equal protection” prohibit?  Another category of questions focus on interpretive methods:  What is the appropriate role of text, structure, history, and policy in constitutional interpretation?  In discussing these questions, we examine how political and social change has influenced the resolution of constitutional disputes and how non-judicial actors, as well as courts, have constructed constitutional meanings.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

The Law of Payment Systems

Class Number: 5770; Catalog Number- Law 613A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Fraher, Richard

Prerequisite:  None (Contracts & Secured Transactions Recommended).

Grading Criteria: Attendance/Participation & Take-home Final Exam

Description: This course will provide students with a foundational understanding of the public laws and regulations that structure the check and wire systems in the U.S. and the federal laws and regulations that overlay the automated clearing house network and the card networks that are structured by private sector rules that bind participants by agreement.  By the end of the course, students will be familiar with Uniform Commercial Code Articles 3, 4, Regulation CC, UCC Article 4A, Regulation E, and the basics of the compliance regime established by the Bank Secrecy Act and the regulations of the Office of Foreign Asset Controls as they apply to payments.  This legal learning will be placed in the context of the rapid pace of technological innovation, globalization, and the policy issues surrounding the transformation of payments systems.

Required Books & Materials:  Ronald Mann, Payment Systems and Other Financial Transactions, 6th ed. (2016); any recent edition of Selected Commercial Transactions, ed. Chomsky, Kunz, Schiltz, and Tabb; online materials as specified.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

The Professional Narrative in Practice

Class Number: 3498; Catalog Number- Law 574X

Credit: 1 hour

Instructor: Prof. Carlson, Sarah

Prerequisite: Instructor/Department Consent 

Grading Criteria: Ask Professor 

DescriptionProfessional Narrative in Practice will help students develop their professional "story" through the creation of job search materials, graded exercises, and small-group interaction in class.  In addition, the course will include a large component aimed at assisting students with an international background or interest, and will address the cultural challenges of searching for a job and practicing law in a foreign country.  The course will be open to students who have secured (or are actively pursuing) a position as a law clerk, legal intern, or summer associate in a country other than their home country.  This course will require that students complete a legal internship and a submit a post-internship personal assessment and evaluation.  Students are eligible for one pass/fail credit

*Last Updated 2017

Trademarks

Class Number: 5597; Catalog Number- Law 766

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Davis, Ted

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionThis course examines the law governing trademarks and other means of identifying products and services in the minds of consumers. Instruction primarily will focus on the federal statute governing trademarks and unfair competition, the Lanham Trademark Act of 1946, but students will learn about state laws and state law doctrines in the field as well. Topics include the protectability of marks, including words, symbols, and “trade dress”; federal registration of marks; causes of action for infringement, dilution, and “cybersquatting”; and defenses, including parodies protected by the First Amendment.

*Last Updated Fall 2015

Transnational Civil Litigation 

Class Number: 5768; Catalog Number- LAW 732B

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Nash, Johnathan

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure 

Grading Criteria: Participation & Scheduled Final Exam

DescriptionThis course examines certain aspects of the conduct of international cases in national courts.  Primary emphasis is on the conduct of transnational litigation in U.S. courts.  Topics include jurisdictional issues and choice-of-law in suits involving foreign parties, suits against foreign states, and the enforcement of foreign judgments.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Transnational Criminal Litigation Practice

Class Number: 5704; Catalog Number- Law 732C

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Maloy, Bruce & Ramirez, Shannon

Prerequisite: None. (Criminal Law is highly recommended)

Grading Criteria: Participation; Collaborative Class Presentation; & Final Paper

DescriptionTransnational criminal procedure describes the intersection of two or more domestic criminal justice systems across international borders—unlike international crime, which refers to wrongs that are criminalized under international law and sometimes tried by international tribunals, whether or not they are also criminalized in states’ domestic laws.We will examine the fundamental concepts and principles of domestic criminal law in the United States occurring across national boundaries and apply this knowledge to current problems.Topics covered include:extradition and rendition,extraterritorial application of the United States criminal law on matters such as public corruption and human trafficking, cross-border evidence-gathering, counterterrorism, special jurisdiction treaties, and immunities.This practical course will enable you to respond to issues in the news today, such as Turkey’s request to extradite cleric Fethullah Gulen or Julian Assange’s fear of rendition and prosecution for the activities of WikiLeaks.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Trial Techniques

Class Number: 3335; Catalog Number- Law 671

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Jones, Lindsay and Lott, Rhani

Note: This course is required for all 2L Students. Also, students will meet with their teams/groups on the following dates: Jan. 20; Feb. 3, 10, 17; & Mar. 3 from 1:30pm to 4:30pmDo NOT register for a conflicting class!

Description: The Kessler-Eidson Trial Techniques Program is a required course that introduces students to the evidence issues, ethical dilemmas, and presentation skills essential in the trial of a case. The course has two parts. Part I is designed to integrate the required Evidence class with trial skills. This Spring semester we will look to bring about this integration of evidence and trial techniques by scheduling workshops:

The first workshop, we will conduct a workshop on Case Analysis and Relevance. Your assignment is to have read the first of two assigned simulated jury cases file thoroughly, and the assigned chapters from the Prof. Zwier’s Trial Advocacy: Normative Approach, Lecture Notes & Readings in advance of the workshop.

The second workshop topic will be Direct and Cross, Hearsay and Character Evidence (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). We will conduct a workshop on Direct and Cross examinations, in which student will examine an assigned witness(s) from a simulated case file. You will be assigned to represent either the plaintiff or defendant and accordingly will be required to prepare either a direct or a cross examination of the assigned witness (es).

The third workshop topic will be on Persuasive and Evidentiary Foundations for Exhibits (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). We will conduct a drill on Exhibit Foundations, using specially prepared exhibit problems from the simulated case file. You will be assigned to represent either the plaintiff or defendant and accordingly will be required to prepare relevant exhibit exercises.

The fourth workshop topic will be Jury Selection (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). You will engage in a jury selection exercise for the simulated case file. Again, you will be assigned to conduct voir dire for your client as plaintiff's or defendant's counsel. You will also be assigned to play the role of a prospective juror for purposes of the workshop.

The fifth workshop topic will be Technology in the Courtroom (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). You will be asked to utilize the evidence camera and computer display technology using specially prepared exhibits from the simulated case file. You will present on the strengths and weakness from your perspective as plaintiff's or defense counsel, as well as outline and explain your legal strategy, to your client or supervising attorney.

These spring workshops will be conducted by some of Atlanta's finest trial lawyers and evidence teachers. As a result of our bringing them in, you will get an opportunity to work closely with these lawyers (in groups as small as 6-8 students) and not only get their insights about the marriage of practice and theory, but also have a chance to demonstrate your oral advocacy skills to them.

Please note: Two provisions significantly impact the application of these taxes. One is “portability” of a decedent’s estate tax exclusion, and the other is the exclusion itself — which is $5.34 million per taxpayer in 2014 ($10.68 million per married couple) and slated to rise to $5.43 million in 2015 (also double that amount for a married couple). These changes limit application of the wealth transfer taxes to a small segment of the decedent population. As a result, you should enroll only if you intend to become an estate planner for such high net worth clients.

In addition, we have been able to partner with downtown Atlanta law firms and law offices to provide you the opportunity to learn on location at their offices. As a result, when you register you will be able to sign up in groups of 24 at either:

  • Alston & Bird Federal Public Defender's Office Jones Day
  • Kilpatrick Townsend King & Spalding McKenna Long & Aldridge Sutherland Asbill & Brennan Troutman Sanders US Attorney's Office
  • DeKalb County Public Defender's Office
  • Harrison & Ford

You will meet at these offices for certain scheduled workshops. (The opening lecture/demonstration will be held at the law school in Tull Auditorium). For those of you who wish to work with general practitioners from small to medium sized firms and/or with state and federal court judges, you should sign up for the General Practitioner section. This group will be limited to 26 students and will meet in breakout groups of 13 or workshop exercises at the law school.

This year the May program session will run between the last examinations make up day and graduation. The May session presents an intensive week of day long learn-by-doing workshops that build upon the earlier spring semester workshops. The May session will be facilitated by 60 trial attorneys and judges from across the country supplemented by 20 local trial attorneys and judges. Students will conduct bench trials on the case file assigned to them over the spring semester. The program will culminate with students conducting jury trials.

*Because the program starts right after final exams, do not schedule a take-home exam if it will interfere with the start of the program.

To alleviate any conflicts that may arise, the ABA allows you to miss 2 classes (4 hours) in any two-hour course, unexcused. As a result you will be allowed to miss either one Friday afternoon workshop, or one half day of the intensive May session. You must submit a written notice (an email will suffice) for any anticipated absence to your team leader and the KEPTT Administrative Director. You will not be allowed to miss either of the trial days, as you must serve on those days either as trial counsel, or as a witness. All requests for an excused absence must be personally delivered in writing to the KEPTT Administrative Director.

There is a $145 mandatory course materials fee. You will receive two case files, both in electronic and hard copy form, an electronic copy of Prof. Zwier’s Trial Advocacy: Normative Approach, Lecture Notes & Readings, and a digital video chip. Hard copies of the course materials file will be distributed in advance of the first class meeting at copy center. An electronic copy of the course materials will also be made available on the course Blackboard site.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Turner Environmental Law Clinic 

Class Number: 3332; Catalog Number- Law 697C

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Goldstein, Mindy

Prerequisite: Environmental Advocacy (Prerequisite or Co-requisite)

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance on various projects assigned. 

Description: The Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides important pro bono legal representation to individuals, community groups, and nonprofit organizations that seek to protect and restore the natural environment for the benefit of the public. Through its work, the clinic offers students an intense, hands-on introduction to environmental law and trains the next generation of environmental attorneys.

Each year, the Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides over 4,000 hours of pro bono legal representation. The key matters occupying our current docket – fighting for clean and sustainable energy; promoting sustainable agriculture and urban farming; and protecting our water, natural resources, and coastal communities—are among the most critical issues for our state, region, and nation. The Clinic’s students benefit and learn from immersion in these real world complex environmental representations.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Winning Litigation Strategies-- The Copyright Example

Class Number: 6077; Catalog Number- Law 710A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Beck, Joe

Prerequisite: None (Not recommended for those who have taken Copyright w/Beck)

Grading Criteria: Scheduled Final Exam

Description: In this course, Professor Beck will discuss actual strategies for winning (and losing) cases on the behalf of the Estate of Martin Luther King, Adam Sandler/Sony Pictures/Judd Apatow, Outkast, Houghton Mifflin, 2 Live Crew, Da Brat, Lil Bow Wow, Jermaine Dupri, Google, and AT&T, among others.  Professor Beck’s opponents in those cases were some of the top lawyers in the country, including Floyd Abrams, Johnnie Cochran, and Marty Garbus.  NOTE: Copyright Law is not a prerequisite for the course.  But if you have taken Copyright Law already, the course would not be appropriate for you.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Wealth Transfer Tax

Class Number: 5605; Catalog Number- Law 926

Credit: 4 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Pennell, Jeff

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Three (3) Take-home Exams

Description: An introduction to the federal estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer taxes, with some consideration of their impact on estate-planning techniques, especially inter-spousal and inter-generational transfers made outright or by will or trust.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Judicial Opinion Writing: Writing for the Judicial Chambers 

Class Number: 3475; Catalog Number- Law 649

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Parrish, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This course will introduce students to the process and practicalities of writing within the context of serving as an appellate court judicial clerk.  The course will explore many topics through assigned readings and class discussion including:  the shifting tone from that of an advocate to that of a decision maker; how the drafting and editing responsibilities are divided between judge and clerk; the ways in which race, gender, religion, past legal background affect judicial decision making; as well as the nuts and bolts of the judicial opinion writing process.

Students will apply what is learned in class to write three pieces during the semester—all within the context of working within an appellate judicial chamber.  During the course of the semester, students will write a bench memo, a majority opinion, and a dissenting opinion, which shall be based on the briefs and record in an assigned case.  Thus, those seeking to learn more about the work of judicial clerks or interested in pursuing a clerkship after graduation will get a working familiarity of the unique work and experience of writing within a judicial chamber.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Seminar: Critical Race Theory

Class Number: 5592; Catalog Number- Law 811

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Brown, Dorothy

Pre-selection form

Grading Criteria: Participation & Paper (Satisfies Upper-Level Writing Requirement).

Prerequisites: Completion of 1st Year of law school

Enrollment: 15

DescriptionCritical Race Theory centers race and racism at the center of American law. This class will examine racial biases in judicial decisions, particularly those covered in the first year of law school: Torts; Contracts; Criminal Procedure; Criminal Law; Property; and Civil Procedure. Each student participant will be required to take the Implicit Association Test on Race prior to the first class.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Seminar: Due Process

Class Number: 3460; Catalog Number- Law 807

Credits: 3 hours 

Instructor(s): Prof. Smith, Fred

Prerequisite: None

Grading: Paper (Satisfies UpperLevel Writing Requirement)

Description: This course will engage in an in-depth treatment of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendment's Due Process Clauses.  Topics include: the original intended scopes of these two clauses; the evolution of procedural and substantive due process; and contemporary legal settings in which these amendments hold force.  Underlying constitutional themes will include access to courts; fairness; accuracy; finality; representative government; separation of powers; and federalism.

*Last Updated Spring 2016

Seminar: International Patent Law & Policy: Current Issues

Class Number: 5595; Catalog Number- Law 816

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Bagley, Margo

Pre-selection: See Website 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Short response papers & Research Paper

Enrollment: 14

Desccription: This course will provide an introduction to key aspects of U.S., international, and comparative patent law and the myriad policies at play in ongoing global patent harmonization conflicts. The value of patents is increasing in many areas while at the same time the scope of patent-eligible subject matter is in flux. We will explore the impact of these forces in the creation and implementation of international agreements concerning patents, such as the Paris Convention, Patent Cooperation Treaty, the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property, and various bilateral agreements. 
Against the backdrop of the U.S patent system, we also will consider the importance of regional patent systems such as the European Patent Convention, as well as features of other major patent players such as India, Japan, South Korea, Brazil, and China. A discussion of current issues such as access to medicines, protection of traditional knowledge, multinational patent litigation, and the patenting of controversial inventions will be an integral part of the course.

*Last Updated Spring 2017

Seminar: Markets for Law

Class Number: 3448; Catalog Number- Law 824, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Pre-selection form:

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: 14

Grading Criteria: Paper (Satisfies Upper-Level Writing Requirement). 

DescriptionThis seminar – which may be of particular appeal to students interested corporate and securities law, environmental law, health law, family law, and other areas characterized by a mix of federal and state law – will explore the unusual dynamic that emerges when multiple jurisdictions compete to produce legal rules. By contrast with our conventional notions of how law is created, the development of law in these settings takes place through a “market” of sorts. As one writer has described it, the law is a “product” in these settings: a good to be priced, bought, and sold. Corporate law – given the centrality of jurisdictional competition to understanding and practicing it today – will serve as our case study. Through relevant readings and your papers’ analysis of jurisdictional competition in your own areas of interest, however – from environmental law to family law, health law to banking law, and criminal law to corporate/securities law – we will seek to understand the nature and the wisdom of markets for law more generally.

*Last Updated Fall 2016.

Seminar: Money in Politics

Class Number: 5593; Catalog Number- Law 805

Credits: 3 hours 

Instructor: Prof. Kang, Michael

Pre-selection form

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: 14

Grading: Paper (Satisfies Upper-Level Writing Requirement)

Description: The plan for the course is to explore normative concerns about the influence of money in American government and democratic politics. We will track these concerns across a number of domains, including campaign finance law, lobbying regulation, bribery, pay to play rules, and judicial elections, and explore critical responses and policy alternatives. We will draw on legal and political science scholarship, as well as currently pending court cases and contemporary accounts of money in politics. The course will incorporate outside speakers from academia or legal practice, as feasible, as well. Grading will be based on class participation and course papers. Election Law is not a prerequisite.

*Last Updated Spring 2015

Seminar: The Right to go to War

Class Number: 5702; Catalog Number- Law 806A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Van der Vyver, Johan

Pre-selection form

Grading Criteria: Paper (Satisfies Upper-Level Writing Requirement) 

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: 14

Description: See Professor

*Last Updated 

2016 Archive 

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
8:00-10:15 a.m.

Civil Procedure OBC; Freer 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1C

Civil Procedure ODF; Schapiro 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Crewson 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5E

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Parrish 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1B

Contracts OBE; Pardo 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Torts OAC; Satz 8:30-10:15 a.m. 1C

 

Civil Procedure OBC; Freer 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1C

Civil Procedure ODF; Schapiro 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Crewson 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5E

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Parrish 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1B

Civil Procedure ODF; Schapiro 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Contracts OBE; Pardo 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Torts OAC; Satz 8:30-10:15 a.m. 1C

Contracts OBE; Pardo 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Legislation/Regulation OAD; Ahdieh 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1C

Legislation/Regulation OEF; Price 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Mathews 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5E

Civil Procedure OAE; Shepherd G 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1D

Legislation/Regulation OBC; Nash 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Carroll 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Schwartz 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1B

Legislation/Regulation OAD; Ahdieh 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1C

Legislation/Regulation OEF; Price 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Mathews 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5E

Civil Procedure OAE; Shepherd G 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1D

Legislation/Regulation OBC; Nash 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Civil Procedure OAE; Shepherd G 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1D

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Carroll 10:30-11:45 a.m.. 5C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Mathews 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5E

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Romig 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Schwartz 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1B

12:15-1:45 p.m.Community Activities

Contracts OAD; Pardo 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1C

Contracts OCF; Vertinsky 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1D

Community Activities

Contracts OAD; Pardo 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1C

Contracts OCF; Vertinsky 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1D

Contracts OAD; Pardo 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1C

Contracts OCF; Vertinsky 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1D

2:00-4:00 p.m.

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Kirk 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1B

Torts OBF; Vandall 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts ODE; Zwier 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

Torts OBF; Vandall 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts ODE; Zwier 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Kirk 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1B

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Romig 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts OBF; Vandall 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts ODE; Zwier 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

4:00-6:00 p.m.

Intro Lgl Anyls, Rsrch & Comm; Thornton 4:00-5:00 p.m. 5B

Intro Lgl Anyls, Rsrch & Comm; Thornton 4:00-5:00 p.m. 5B

ILARC Sections by Professor

Carroll – D4, D5, F4, F5, F6, F7

Crewson - A1, A2, A3, E1, E2, E3

Parrish - E4, E5, E6, E7, A4, A5

Mathews – B1, B2, B3, C1, C2, C3

Kirk – A6, A7, C4, C5, C6, C7

Romig – B4, B5, B6, B7, D6, D7

Schwartz – D1, D2, D3, F1, F2, F3

Thornton – AJD students

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
8:00-10:15 a.m.

Business Associations; Shepherd, G 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1E

Evidence; Seaman 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Trusts & Estates; Pennell 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5C

American Legl Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section A Daspit 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5B

International Law Van der Vyver 8:45-10:15 p.m. 5C 

Legal Profession Hughes 9:15-10:15 a.m. 1E

Remedies; Partlett 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1B

Business Associations; Shepherd, G 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1E

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Avery 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Evidence; Seaman 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Trusts & Estates; Pennell 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5C

American Legl Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section A Daspit 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5B

International Law Van der Vyver 8:45-10:15 p.m. 5C 

Legal Profession Hughes 9:15-10:15 a.m. 1E

Remedies; Partlett 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1B

 

 

EXTERNSHIP: Civil Litigation; Shalf 8:30-9:30 a.m. 5B

EXTERNSHIP: Judicial; Hirokawa 8:30-9:30 p.m. 5C

Legal Profession; Hughes 9:30-10:30 a.m. 1E

Professional Narrative; Carlson (10/16 - 11/6) 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 5F

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Administrative Law; Volokh 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

Bankruptcy; Pardo 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Federal Courts; Smith 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1B

Int'l Trade Law & Policy; 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Legal Profession; Terrell 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

 

Banking Law Elliott 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Comparative & Intl Family Law; Woodhouse 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m 5A

Const'l Crim. Proc: Investigation; Cloud 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

Intellectual Property; Schaetzel 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Administrative Law; Volokh 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

Bankruptcy; Pardo 10:30-12:00 a.m. 5G

Federal Courts; Smith 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m 1B

Int'l Trade Law & Policy; 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Legal Profession; Terrell 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m 1E

Banking Law; Elliott 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

Comparative & Intl Family Law; Woodhouse 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Const'l Crim. Proc: Investigation; Cloud 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

European Union Law I; Mickevicius 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. 5D

Intellectual Property; Schaetzel 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Law & Religion: Theories, Methods, andApproaches; Allard 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 5B

12:15-1:45 p.m.Community Activities

English Legal History; Volokh 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

Family Law II; Broyde 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1B

Fundamentals of Income Taxation; Pennell 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1E

Juvenile Law; Duncan 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

Community Activities

English Legal History; Volokh 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

Family Law II; Broyde 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1B

Fundamentals of Income Taxation; Pennell 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1E

Juvenile Law; Duncan 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

International Humanitarian Law Clinic; Blank 12:00-2:00 p.m. 5E

2:00-4:00 p.m.

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I; Metzger 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1F

Human Rights Advocacy; Ludsin 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

SEM: The Role of Patents; Vertinsky 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5D

SEM: Implement US International Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5K

Advanced Legal Research (8/17-10/2); Christian 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5C

American Legal Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section B; Daspit 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5F

Capital Defender Workshop; Moore, J 3:30-5:30 p.m. Off Campus

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I; Metzger 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1F

Cross Exam. Techniques; McCoyd 2:00-5:00 p.m. 5E

Environmental Law; Nash 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1B

Evidence; Goldfeder 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1E

Foreign & Intl Legal Research (10/5-11/23); Flick 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5C

International Criminal Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5B

SEM: Professional Negligence; Partlett 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

Access to Justice Workshop; Costa 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1F

Am Legl Writ, Analys & Rsch II; Daspit 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5B

Human Rights Advocacy; Ludsin 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

Law and Technology; Goldfeder 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1D

SEM: Int'l Env Law & Vulnerability; Fineman/Samandari 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5D

SEM: Law & Social Movements; Dinner 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

SEM: Products & Liability; Vandall 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5K

American Legal Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section B; Daspit 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5F

Business & Tax Legal Research (8/17-10/2); Sneed 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5G

Colloquium Series Workshop; Levine 2:00-3:00 p.m. 5K

Environmental Law; Nash 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1B

Evidence; Goldfeder 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1E

Health Law Research (10/5-11/23); Glon 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5G

International Criminal Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5B

Mental Health Issues in Crim. Justice Sys.; Jones 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1F

SEM: Children's Rights; Woodhouse 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

 

Intro to Am. Legal System LLM; Price 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1E

4:15-6:00 p.m.

and

6:15-9:45 p.m.

ADR; Armstrong 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1B

Adv. Commercial Real Estate; Minkin 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1E

Adv. Evidence; McCoyd 6:15-7:45 p.m. 5F

Adv. Legal Writing & Editing; Terrell 4:15-4:15-6:15 p.m. Tull

Criminal Pretrial Motions Practice; Grimberg, 6:15-9:15 p.m. 1F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5A

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1D

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1C

Employment Law; Weirich 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5E

Fundamentals of Innovation I; TBA 4:30-7:15 p.m. 5C

Intl Commercial Arbitration; Reetz, 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Intro to American Legal System JM; Mathews 4:00-5:45 p.m. 5E

Legislation/Regulation LLM/JM; Price 6:00-7:00 p.m. N112

Negotiations; Athans/Perry 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5B

Pretrial Litigation; McCoyd 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5F

Veterans Benefits Law; Early 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5B

ADR; Allgood 5:30-7:00 p.m. 5D

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. G114A

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1C

Doing Deals: General Counsel; Notte 6:15-9:15 p.m. 5B

Doing Deals: IP Transactions; Perry 4:30-7:30 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Private Equity; Crowley 4:00-6:15 p.m. B231 (Goizueta)

Employment Discrim Lab; King/Shultz 6:15-8:15 p.m. 1F

EXTERNSHIP: Criminal Defense; TBA 5:00-6:00 p.m. N111

EXTERNSHIP: Public Interest; TBA 5:00-6:00 p.m. N109

Food and Drug Law; Kitchens 4:30-6:00 p.m. 1B

Global Public Health Law; Brady 4:00-6:00 p.m. 1D

Internet Law; Nodine 6:15-8:15 p.m. 1D

Negotiations; Eldridge 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5C

Sentencing Practice; Marbutt 6:15-9:15 p.m. 1B

 

Adv. Evidence; McCoyd 6:15-7:45 p.m. 5F

Adv. Civil Trial Practice; Wellon 6:30-8:30 p.m. 1F

Analys, Rsch & Comms for non-lawyers JM; TBA 4:15-6:00 p.m. N155

Constitutional Lit; Weber 4:30-7:30 p.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5A

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. G114A

Doing Deals: Commercial Lending Transactions; Powell 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1D

Environmental Advocacy Workshop; Horder 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5D

Expert Witness Examination; Sheffield 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5E

EXTERNSHIP: Government Counsel; TBA 5:15-6:15 p.m. N109

EXTERNSHIP: Advance; TBA 6:30-7:30 p.m. N109

EXTERNSHIP: Prosecution; TBA 5:00-6:00 p.m. N111

Franchise Law; Aronson 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1B

Kids in Conflict with Law; Waldman 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1E

Labor Law; Wilson 6:30-8:30 p.m. 5B

Legislation/Regulation LLM-JM; Price 6:00-7:00 p.m. N155

Pretrial Litigation; McCoyd 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5F

SEM: Adv. International Negotiations; Zwier/Balian 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5K

Special Topics/Technology 1; TBA 4:30-7:15 p.m. 1C

Trademarks; Davis 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5B

White Collar Crime Workshop; Templer 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1F

 

ADR; Allgood 5:30-7:00 p.m. 5D

Doing Deals: Complex Restruct.; Gordon/Marsh 5:00-8:00 p.m. 5A

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1D

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1E

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

DUI Trials; Tatum 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1F

EXTERNSHIP: Corporate Counsel; TBA 6:15-7:15 p.m. 5F

EXTERNSHIP: Small Firm; TBA 6:15-7:15 p.m. 5B

Food and Drug Law; Kitchens 4:30-6:00 p.m. 1B

Land Use; Pennington 5:00-7:00 p.m. 1C

Mental Health Issues in Criminal Law Jones 6:00-8:00 p.m. 5F

Effective August 11, 2015. Schedule and classroom locations are subject to change. Exam classroom assignments in parantheses. 

Date9:00 a.m. Exams2:00 p.m. Exams
Monday, 11/30/2015
  • Administrative Law (5F) 
  • Bankruptcy (1D/1E)
  • Federal Courts (1C)
  • Civil Procedure
    • Freer (1D/1E)
    • Shepherd (1B/1C)
    • Schapiro (5A/5B/5C//5D)
Tuesday, 12/1/2015
  • Legal Profession (Hughes) (1B/1C) 
  • Family Law II (5F)
  • Juvenile Law (5B/5C)
  • Legal Profession (Terrell) (1B/1C)
  • International Law (1E)
  • Remedies (5E/5F)
Wednesday, 12/2/2015
  • Business Associations (1C/1D)
  • Evidence (Seaman) (5A/B/E/F)
  • Trusts & Estates (1E)
  • Evidence (Goldfeder) (1C/1D)
Thursday, 12/3/2015
  • Banking Law (5B/5C)
  • Const Crim Proc: Evid (1B/1C)
  • IP (1E)
  • English Lg Hist (5E)
  • European Union (1D )
  • Contracts
    • Contracts AD (1B/1C/1D)
    • Contracts BE (1E)
    • Contracts (Vertinsky) (5EFC)
Friday, 12/4/2015
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY
Saturday, 12/5/2015
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Sunday,12/6/2015
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Monday, 12/7/2015
  • Employment Law (1E)
  • Intl Comm Arbitration (5C)
  • Veterans Benefits (5D)
  • Torts 
    • Satz (1D/1E)
    • Vandall (1B/1C)
    • Zwier (5C/E/F)
Tuesday, 12/8/2015
  • Fund Income Tax (1D/1E)
  • Environmental Law (5F)
  • Intl Crim Law (5E)
  • Food & Drug Law (1B/1C)
Wednesday, 12/9/2015
  • Franchise Law (1B)
  • Labor Law (5B)
  • Trademark Law (1D)
  • Legislation/Regulation 
    • Price (1B/1C)
    • Grad- Price (1F)
    • Nash (5E/5F)
    • Ahdieh (1D/1E)
Thursday, 12/10/2015
  • Internet Law (1E)
  • Sentencing Practice (5C)
  • DD:Private Equity (1B)
Friday, 12/11/2015
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY
MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday

Evidence (4875); McCoyd
8:30 AM-9:55 AM
1E

Business Associations (4861); Freer
8:30 AM-10:25 AM
1D

Constitutional Law I (BE); Seaman
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1D

Family Law (4860); Broyde
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1E

International Law (4818); An-Naim
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1B

Intro to Legal Advocacy (D4-5, F4-7); Carroll
10:45 AM-12:00 PM
5F

Intro to Legal Advocacy (D1-3, F1-3); Schwartz
10:45 AM-12:00 PM
1C

Intro to Legal Advocacy (AJD); Thornton
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
1B

Intro to Legal Advocacy (A6-7, C4-7); Kirk
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
5F

Intro to Legal Advocacy (B1-3, C1-3); Mathews
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
5B

Intro to Law & Econ (4904); Shepherd, J.
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1C

Intro to Legal Advocacy (B4-7, D6-7); Romig
2:30 PM-3:45 PM
5C

Constitutional Law I (AC); Smith, Jr.
3:30 PM-4:55 PM
1E

Intro to Legal Advocacy (A1-3, E1-3); Harris
8:30 AM-9:45 AM
5B

Intro to Legal Advocacy (E4-7, A4-5); Parrish
8:45 AM-9:55 AM
1B

Property (BD); Dinner
9:00 AM-10:15 AM
1C

Property (CF); Alexander
9:30 AM-10:45 AM
1E

Constitutional Law I (BE); Seaman
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1D

Criminal Law (AD); Duncan
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1C

Health Law (4957); Satz
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5E

Administrative Law (4805); Arthur
11:00 AM-12:25 PM
1E

Property (AE); Hughes Jr.
12:00 PM-1:15 PM
1C

Criminal Law (BC); Cloud III
12:00 PM-1:25 PM
1D

Constitutional Law I (DF); Shanor
12:30 PM-1:55 PM
1E

Intellectual Property (Survey) (6169); Vertinsky

1:30 PM-2:55 PM
1C

Criminal Law (EF); Levine
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1E

Business Associations (4887); Kang
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
1D

Constitutional Law I (AC); Smith, Jr.
3:30 PM-4:55 PM
1E

Employment Discrimination (4925); Shanor
4:00 PM-5:25 PM
5B

Evidence (4875); McCoyd
8:30 AM-9:55 AM
1E

Business Associations (4861); Freer
8:30 AM-10:25 AM
1D

Property (BD); Dinner
9:00 AM-10:15 AM
1C

Family Law (4860); Broyde
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1E

International Law (4818); An-Naim
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1B

Intro to Legal Advocacy (D4-5, F4-7); Carroll
10:45 AM-12:00 PM
5F

Intro to Legal Advocacy (D1-3, F1-3); Schwartz
10:45 AM-12:00 PM
1C

Intro to Legal Advocacy (AJD); Thornton
2:00 M-3:15 PM
1B

Intro to Legal Advocacy (A6-7, C4-7); Kirk
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
5F

Intro to Legal Advocacy (B1-3, C1-3); Mathews
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
5B

Intro to Law & Econ (4904); Shepherd, J.
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1C

Intro to Legal Advocacy (B4-7, D6-7); Romig
2:30 PM-3:45 PM
GH5C

Constitutional Law I (AC); Smith, Jr.
3:30 PM-4:55 PM
1E

Intro to Legal Advocacy (A1-3, E1-3); Harris
8:30 AM-9:45 AM
5B

Intro to Legal Advocacy (E4-7, A4-5); Parrish
8:45 AM-9:55 AM
1B

Property (BD);Dinner
9:00 AM-10:15 AM
1C

Property (CF); Alexander
9:30 AM-10:45 AM
1E

Constitutional Law I (BE); Seaman
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1D

Criminal Law (AD); Duncan
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1C

Health Law (4957); Satz
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5E

Administrative Law (4805); Arthur
11:00 AM-12:25 PM
1E

Property (AE); Hughes Jr.
12:00 PM-1:15 PM
1C

Criminal Law (BC); Cloud III
12:00 PM-1:25 PM
1D

Constitutional Law I (DF); Shanor
12:30 PM-1:55 PM
1E

Intellectual Property (Survey) (6169); Vertinsky
1:30 PM-2:55 PM
1C

Criminal Law (EF); Levine
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1E

Business Associations (4887); Kang
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
1D

Employment Discrimination (4925); Shanor
4:00 PM-5:25 PM
5B

Property (CF); Alexander
9:30 AM-10:45 AM
1E

Property (AE); Hughes Jr.
12:00 PM-1:15 PM
1C

Constitutional Law I (DF); Shanor
12:30 PM-1:55 PM
1E

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday

Evidence (4875); McCoyd
8:30 AM-9:55 AM
1E

Business Associations (4861); Freer
8:30 AM-10:25 AM
1D

International Human Rights (5825); Van der Vyver
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5E

Secured Transactions (4877); Pardo
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5F

Security Regulations (5868); Shepherd, G.
10:00 AM-11:25 AM
5B

SEM: Privacy, Reputation, & Economic Interests in Tort Law (5306); Partlett
10:00 AM-11:55 AM
5G

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I (4871); Metzger
10:30 AM-11:25 AM
1F

Analytical Methods/Lawyers (4926); Shepherd, J.
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5C

Family Law (4860); Broyde
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1E

International Law (4818); An-Naim
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1B

National Security Law (4944); Blank
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5E

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I (4853); Metzger
2:00 PM-2:55 PM
1F

Complex Litigation (4867); Freer
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1E

Intro to Law & Econ (4904); Shepherd, J.
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1C

Jewish Law (4901); Broyde
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
5J

Child Welfare Law and Policy (4862); Carter
2:00 PM-3:55 PM
5A

SEM: Legality of Armed Interventions (5304); Van der Vyver
2:00 PM-3:55 PM
5K

Catalyzing Social Impacts (6179); Roberts
2:30 PM-3:45 PM
GBS 238

SEM: Advanced Int'l Negotiations; Zwier
3:00 PM-5:55 PM
5G

Law & Economic Development (5295); Lee
3:00 PM-4:25 PM
1D

Islamic Law (5377); An-Naim
3:30 PM-4:55 PM
5E

Alternative Dispute Resolution (4872); Armstrong
3:30 PM-6:25 PM
1F

Alternative Dispute Resolution (4808); Allgood
4:00 PM-5:25 PM
5D

Art & Acts of Justice (5376); Felman
4:00 PM-7:00 PM
Calloway N106

Roman Law (5827); Domingo
4:00 PM-5:55 PM
5F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (4888); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
G114

Doing Deals: Deal Skills (4863); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5C

Doing Deals: Deal Skills (4878); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
N101

Fund of Innov II (4816); Morris
4:30 PM-7:25 PM
1D

Copyright Law (4873); Beck
4:30 PM-5:55 PM
5B

Colloquium Series Workshop: War & Security in Law, Culture, and Society (5020); Dudziak
4:30 PM-6:25 PM
5J

Income Taxations of Trusts, Estates, Grantors, & Beneficiaries (5826); Pennell
5:00 PM-6:55 PM
5E

Contracts-LLM and JM (5824); Lee
5:00 PM-6:30 PM
1E

EXTERN: Criminal Defense (4911); Kleinrock
6:00 PM-6:55 PM
5G

Doing Deals: Corporate Practice (4857); New
6:00 PM-8:55 PM
1C

Negotiations (5523); Perry
6:30 PM-8:25 PM
5A

Advanced Issues in White Collar Crime (5018); Maloy
6:30 PM-8:25 PM
5K

Criminal Tax (5521); Grimberg
6:30 PM-9:25 PM
1F

Patent Law (5027); Morris
8:00 AM-9:25 PM
1D

ALW: Blogging & SM (4935); Romig
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5A

International Humanitarian Law (4876); Van der Vyver
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5E

Doing Deals: Accounting in Action (4855); TBA
9:00 AM-11:55 AM
5C

Am. Legal Writing, Analysis & Research I -GRAD (4905); Daspit
10:00 AM-11:25 AM
1B

Conflict of Law (5022); Hay
10:00 AM-11:25 AM
1F

Sports & Marketing Law (4824); Linsky
10:00 AM-11:55 AM
G575

Health Law (4907); Satz
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5E

Legal Profession (4820); Elliott
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5F

Jury Selection (5379); McCoyd
10:30 AM-12:25 PM
5B

Administrative Law (4805); Arthur
11:00 AM-12:25 PM
1E

Criminal Proc: Adjudication (4922); Levine
12:00 PM-1:25 PM
5F

Federal Income Tax: Individual (4941); Brown
12:00 PM-1:55 PM
5E

SEM: Due Process (5305); Smith, Jr.
12:00 PM-1:55 PM
5K

Human Rights: Introduction & Selected Topics (4894); Perry
12:30 PM-1:55 PM
5B

Law of International Organizations (5301); Tkeshelashvili
1:00 PM-1:55 PM
1B

Commercial Sales (5021); Hay
1:00 PM-2:25 PM
1F

Intellectual Property Survey (6169); Vertinsky
1:30 PM-2:55 PM
1C

Religion, Culture & Law in Comparative Practice (5302); Ludsin
1:30 PM-3:25 PM
5J

Antitrust (4920); Arthur
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
5C

First Amendment/Free Speech (5522); Seaman
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
5E

International Business Transactions CANCELLED

SEM: Markets for Law (5032); Ahdieh
2:00 PM-3:55 PM
5D

Business Associations (4887); Kang
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
1D

Foreign Relations Law (5025); Dudziak
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
5A

Legal Profession (5308); Goldfeder
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
5F

White Collar Crime (5989); Cloud III
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
5B

Advanced Legal Research (4807); Christian
2:30 PM-4:25 PM (Jan 5-Feb 16)
5K

Technology in Legal Practice (4910); Glon
2:30 PM-4:25 PM (Feb 23-Apr 12)
5K

Intro to American Legal System (4954); Mathews
4:15 PM-5:55 PM
5C

Employment Discrimination (4925); Shanor
4:00 PM-5:25 PM
5B

International PatentLaw (5299); Bagley
4:00 PM-7:00PM (Jan 5 - Jan 21)
1A

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (4889); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5G

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (4912); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5J

Doing Deals: Deal Skills (4879); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
1C

Doing Deals: Deal Skills (4880); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5A

Entertainment Law (4812); Sanders
4:30 PM-5:55 PM
1B

Law in Public Health (4823); Kocher
4:30 PM-6:25 PM
5F

Tax Controversies (4903); Loechel
4:30 PM-6:25 PM
5K

Water Resource Law (5028); Moore
4:30 PM-7:25 PM
5E

EXTERN: Prosecution (4913); Hames
5:00 PM-5:55 PM
N111

EXTERN: Small Firm (6098); Nydick
5:00 PM-5:55 PM
G114

Alternative Dispute Resolution-LLM/JM (4960); Allgood
5:00 PM-6:25 PM
5D

Doing Deals: Mergers & Acquisitions (4874);TBA
5:00 PM-7:55 PM
1D

Media Law (5380); Counts
5:00 PM-7:55 PM
1E

Advanced Pretrial Lit (4825); Elmore
5:30 PM-8:25 PM
1F

EXTERN: Public Interest (4882); Segal
6:00 PM-6:55 PM
N101

American Legal History - Citizenship & Race Workshop (6096); Cleaver
6:00 PM-7:55 PM
5K

Employment Discriminiation Lab (4870); King Jr
6:30 PM-7:25 PM
5B

Securities: Brokers/Dealers (4946);Terry
6:30 PM-7:55 PM
5C

Negotiations (4822); Eldridge
6:30 PM-8:25 PM
1B

Negotiations (4821); Athans
6:30 PM-8:25 PM
5F

Evidence (4875); McCoyd
8:30 AM-9:55 AM
1E

EXTERN: Judicial (4885); Hirokawa
8:30 AM-9:25 AM
5K

Business Associations (4861); Freer
8:30 AM-10:25 AM
1D

International Human Rights (5825); Van der Vyver
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5E

Secured Transactions (4877); Pardo
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (4890); TBA
9:00 AM-11:55 AM
5G

Security Regulations (5868); Shepherd, G.
10:00 AM-11:25 AM
5B

Business Immigration Law (5019); Kuck
10:00 AM-11:55 AM
1F

Analytical Methods/Lawyers (4926); Shepherd, J.
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5C

Family Law (4860); Broyde
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1E

International Law (4818); An-Naim
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
1B

National Security Law (4944); Blank
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5E

Complex Litigation (4867); Freer
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1E

Intro to Law & Econ (4904); Shepherd, J.
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
1C

Jewish Law (4901); Broyde
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
5J

International Humanitarian Law Clinic (4852); Blank
2:00 PM-3:55 PM
5D

Catalyzing Social Impacts (6179); Roberts
2:30 PM-3:45 PM
GBS 238

ALWAR II - GRAD(5383); Daspit
2:30 PM-3:25 PM
1F

Foreign Relations Law (5025); Dudziak
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
5A

Ethics of Criminal Justice Practice (5378); Tatum
3:00 PM 4:55 PM
G114

Law & Economic Development (5295); Lee
3:00 PM-4:25 PM
1D

Islamic Law (5377); An-Naim
3:30 PM-4:55 PM
5E

Doing Deals: Commercial Real Estate (4856); Elliott
3:30 PM-6:25 PM
1B

Alternative Dispute Resolution (4808); Allgood
4:00 PM-5:25 PM
5D

SEM: Corporate Governance (5822); Kang
4:00 PM-5:55 PM
5G

Patent Litigation (5027); Kodish
4:00 PM-5:55 PM
5F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (4891); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5K

Doing Deals: Deal Skills (4892); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
N111

Doing Deals: Deal Skills (4858); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
N109

Doing Deals: Venture Capital (4859); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5A

Special Topics/Technology II (4849); Morris
4:30 PM-7:25 PM
TBA

Copyright Law (4873); Beck
4:30 PM-5:55 PM
5B

Education Law and Policy (4896); Waldman
4:30 PM-6:25 PM
N155

Federal Income Tax: Partnerships (4815); Beaudrot
4:30 PM-6:25 PM
5C

Contracts-LLM and JM (5824); Lee
5:00 PM-6:30 PM
1E

EXTERN: Advanced (4915); Amidon
5:00 PM-5:55 PM
5E

Business & Strategic Lawyering (4897); Aronson
5:00 PM-6:55 PM
1C

EXTERN: Legislative Policy (4951); Barrocas
6:00 PM-6:55 PM
5D

EXTERN: Government Counsel (4883); Amidon
6:30 PM-7:25 PM
5G

Civil Trial Pract: Family Law (4866); Wellon
6:00 PM-9:00 PM
1F

Asset Forfeiture (5294); Krepp
6:30 PM-8:25 PM
5B

Patent Law (5027); Morris
8:00 AM-9:25 PM
1D

Estate Planning (4813); Pennell
8:30 AM-10:25 AM
5C

ALW: Blogging & SM (4935); Romig
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5A

Corporate Finance (5023); Shepherd
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5F

International Humanitarian Law (4876); Van der Vyver
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5E

Am. Legal Writing, Analysis & Research I - GRAD (4905); Daspit
10:00 AM-11:25 AM
1B

Conflict of Law (5022); Hay
10:00 AM-11:25 AM
1F

Health Law (4907); Satz
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5E

Legal Profession (4820); Elliott
10:30 AM-11:55 AM
5F

European Union Law II (5300); Mickevicius
10:30 AM-12:25 PM
1A

Federal Income Tax: Corporations (4814); Fowler
10:30 AM-12:25 PM
5B

Administrative Law (4805); Arthur
11:00 AM-12:25 PM
1E

Criminal Proc: Adjudication (4922); Levine
12:00 PM-1:25 PM
5F

Federal Income Tax: Individual (4941); Brown
12:00 PM-1:55 PM
5E

Human Rights: Introduction & Selected Topics (4894); Perry
12:30 PM-1:55 PM
5B

SEM: Animal Law; Satz
12:30 PM-2:25 PM
5A

Law of International Organizations (5301); Tkeshelashvili
1:00 PM-1:55 PM
1B

Commercial Sales (5021); Hay
1:00 PM-2:25 PM
1F

Intellectual Property Survey (6169); Vertinsky
1:30 PM-2:55 PM
1C

Antitrust (4920); Arthur
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
5C

First Amendment/Free Speech (5522); Seaman
2:00 PM-3:25 PM
5E

International Business Transactions CANCELLED

Business Associations (4887); Kang
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
1D

Legal Profession (5308); Goldfeder
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
5F

White Collar Crime (5989); Cloud III
2:30 PM-3:55 PM
5B

Access to Justice W/S (4933); Costa
2:30 PM-4:25 PM
1F

Bankruptcy Law Research (5298); Flick
2:30 PM-4:25 PM (Feb 25-Apr 14)
5K

State Law Legal Research (5297); Sneed
2:30 PM-4:25 PM (Jan 7-Feb 18)
5K

SEM: Arbitration Law in Religion (5821); Broyde
3:00 PM-4:55 PM
5D

Employment Discrimination (4925); Shanor
4:00 PM-5:25 PM
5B

ARC - GRAD (5382); Daspit
4:00 PM-5:55 PM
5C

Litigation Analytics (6097); Albertelli
4:00 PM-5:55 PM
1C

Patent Practice & Procedures (5303); Kirsch
4:00 PM-5:55 PM
5A

Doing Deals: Negotiated Corporate Transactions (4869); TBA
4:00 PM-6:30 PM
5G

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (4891); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5J

Litigating ID Issues (5026); McCoyd
4:30 PM-6:30 PM
1F

Entertainment Law (4812); Sanders
4:30 PM-5:55 PM
1B

Higher Education (5296); Fowler
4:30 PM-7:25 PM
5E

Alternative Dispute Resolution-LLM/JM (4960); Allgood
5:00 PM-6:25 PM
5D

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (MCL); TBA
4:15 PM-7:15 PM
5K

EXTERN: Corporate Counsel (4886); Cavitt
6:00 PM-6:55 PM
5A

International PatentLaw (5299); Bagley
6:00 PM-9:00PM (Jan 5 - Jan 21)
G114

Securities: Brokers/Dealers (4946); Terry
6:30 PM-7:55 PM
5C

Customs Laws & Admin (5024); Pike
6:30 PM-8:25 PM
5D

Advanced Criminal Trial Skills (4934); Rubin
6:30 PM-9:25 PM
5F

EXTERN: Civil Litigation (4884); Shalf
8:30 AM-9:25 AM
G114

Corporate Finance (5023); Shepherd
9:00 AM-10:25 AM
5F

Writing for Judicial Chambers (5823); Parrish
10:30 AM-12:25 PM
5G

International PatentLaw (5299); Bagley
10:30 AM-1:30PM (Jan 5 - Jan 21)
1A

Date9:00 a.m. Exams2:00 p.m. Exams
Wednesday
4/20/2016

Corporate Finance  1B/1C

Legal Professions - Elliott  1E

Criminal Proc: Adjudication   5C

Fed Income Tax: Individual  5F

Property - Alexander  1D/1E

Property-Hughes   1B/1C

Property-Dinner   5A/5B/5C/5D

Patent Law   5J

International Human Law   5E

Thursday
4/21/2016

Complex Litigation  1E/1F

Foreign Relations Law  5J

Copyright Law  1D

Fed Income Tax: Partnerships   1B

Business & Strategic Lawyering  1C

Income Tax: Trusts, Estates  1D (5PM START)

Friday
4/22/2016

Analytical Methods/Lawyers  1C

National Security Law  1D

Constitutional Law - Shanor  1A/1B/1C

Constitutional Law - Seaman  1D/1E

Constitutional Law - Smith  5B/5C/5F

Saturday, 4/23/2016
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Sunday, 4/24/2016
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Monday, 4/25/2016

Health Law  5B

Administrative Law  5E

Intellectual Property  5C

Business Associations - Kang  1D/1E

Employee Discrimination  1C

Contract - Lee  5F

Business Associations - Freer  1C/1D

Evidence  5E/5F

International Human Rights  1B

Secured Transactions  5B/5C

Securities Regulation  1E

Tuesday, 4/26/2016
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY
Wednesday, 4/27/2016

Antitrust  5F

The First Amendment  1B

Legal Profession - Goldfeder  1E/1F

White Collar  1C

Criminal Law - Duncan  1B/1C

Criminal Law - Cloud  1D/1E

Criminal Law - Levine  5A/5B/5C/5D

European Union Law II  1A

Thursday, 4/28/2016

Entertainment Law  5E

Tax Controversies  5K

Higher Education Law  5J

Water Resources Law  5C

Customs Law & Administration  5A

Family Law  1C/1D

International Law  5C

Intro to Law & Econ  1B/1E

Islamic Law  1F

Patent Litigation - Kodish  5B

Friday, 4/29/2016
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY

Updated as of 3/18/2016.

*Course availability is subject to change.

Law 679, 04A.  Access to Justice Workshop 

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Costa

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Classroom exercises, Court performance, & Periodic reaction papers

Description: Access to Justice provides second and third year law students the unique opportunity to see how justice is actually administered in criminal cases in actual Georgia Courts and to develop their courtroom oral advocacy skills in a real-world setting. We will examine, through readings and classroom discussion, the ways in which poor and under-served populations access justice within the framework of the traditional criminal justice system, and the increasing role of accountability courts for defendants suffering with drug, alcohol or mental health afflictions. But this class extends far beyond the conventional classroom in three significant ways. First, students will take multiple off-campus trips, including touring the local jail facility and attending actual court sessions to observe criminal case proceedings. Second, students will receive real recent criminal case warrants and police reports and will conduct interviews with actual defendants (either in or out of custody) and participate in mock classroom hearings on these cases. Lastly, where possible, students will represent their clients in actual court proceedings (bond hearings, preliminary hearings, and even possibly motions and trials). Students should plan to be in court one weekday morning every other week throughout the semester, though multiple weekday mornings options will be available each week to accommodate individual student schedules. Students will be graded primarily on their performance in both classroom and courtroom hearings and their participation in classroom discussion, and secondarily on periodic papers analyzing their experiences.

Please note: any students who have previously or are currently interning or doing a field placement with the State Court Division of the Law Office of the DeKalb County Public Defender will be ineligible for this course.  Additionally, this course cannot be taken concurrently with an internship or field placement in the DeKalb County Solicitors or District Attorney’s Office as it would cause a professional conflict.

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 701, 02A. Administrative Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Volokh

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Much of the law we live under is made and then applied by administrative agencies. Administrative law is a study of how this law is made and then applied. Specific topics include the constitutional standards under which legislative and judicial power is transferred to agencies; the procedures that control agency lawmaking and adjudication, and the availability and scope of judicial review of agency action.

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 619. Adoption

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Woodhouse

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class exercises & Final Paper.

Description: This course will explore the laws, policies and procedures governing the creation of child/parent relationships through adoption.  Among the topics to be covered are regulation of domestic and international adoptions by statutes, treaties and agreements, the rights of birth parents, adoptive parents and children, adoption of children with special needs, single parent, stepparent and kinship adoption, parental vetoes, voluntary consent and involuntary termination of rights, adoption across ethnic, racial and tribal boundaries, the role of adoption in LGBT families, open adoption and the opening of adoption records.  We will also explore the historical roots of adoption, and developmental, cultural, religious and social science insights into adoption law and policy.  Methods of teaching include lecture, discussion, media and in-class exercises.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 847, 06A. Advanced Civil Trial Practice

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Wellon

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Class Work & Mock Trial 

Description: Designed to build on the litigation techniques and skills first encountered in the Trial Techniques Program. Using a simulated case file in an employment case, the class will help develop the skills, strategies and tactics necessary to be effective courtroom advocates. The course will employ lecture, demonstrations, movie and video-tape simulations as well as regular participation by the students and constructive criticism and helpful hints from the course instructors, who are all very experienced litigators and judges. Invited guests who litigate regularly in this area of practice will also participate. Courtroom technology and visual aids will also be explored. The course will conclude with student teams conducting a trial in a real courtroom setting, which is now planned for November 17th where participation is mandatory.

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 617A, 000. Advanced Commercial Real Estate

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Minkin

Prerequisite: Real Estate Finance (recommended)

Grading Criteria: Take-Home Exam and Class work

Description: What does a commercial real estate attorney really do every day? What does he or she think about and what is the relationship between the attorney and his or her client? What are the attorney’s responsibilities to accomplish the client’s goals? This course will explore those questions and related issues in the context of sophisticated commercial real estate transactions. During the course the students will be introduced to many of the essential elements of commercial real estate, including development concepts, purchase and sale of real estate, equity financing, debt financing, leasing, operational issues with large retail developments, and financial restructuring issues. Course materials will include Harvard Business School cases applicable to commercial real estate issues, form documentation applicable to many areas of commercial real estate, and relevant articles.

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 632A, 04A. Advanced Evidence

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Geary; Lott; & McCoyd

Prerequisite: Evidence

Grading Criteria: Critiqued classroom exercises & In-class exam (last day of class)

Description: The objective of this course is to explore and develop selected complex evidentiary issues that are not covered by the basic Evidence course. The objective will be accomplished through the use of both lecture and simulations that present these issues in the context of complex civil and criminal litigation scenarios. While learning to analyze sophisticated evidentiary issues, students will also be able to expand the basic trial skills they acquired in Trial Advocacy. The faculty will lead participants through the quagmire of the Federal Rules of Evidence. This course offers participants the necessary skills to work through evidentiary issues with greater accuracy and confidence; ensure baseline relevancy issues are met, to affirm that probative value outweighs unfair prejudice; analyze quickly whether character evidence, including prior bad acts, is admissible; describe when habit and custom evidence may be admitted; utilize appropriate impeachment objections after analyzing the rules regarding bias, capacity and prior inconsistent statements; and, outline an analytical scheme for hearsay objections and the exceptions.

The course is designed for law students who have at the minimum taken a basic course in evidence.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 657, 02A. Advanced Legal Research

ACCELERATED CLASS: August 15, 2016-September 26, 2016

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Reid, Richelle

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Description: This course is an examination of the legal research methods and sources beyond the basics taught during the first year of law school. Through a mixture of lectures and practical applications with in-class exercises and a final research project, students will become familiar with topics such as case, statute & regulatory research, aids for the practitioner and legislative history research. This practical, skills-based course is designed to help prepare students for practice or future study. This new half-semester format makes class time especially important. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Missing more than one class period may jeopardize a student’s academic standing and will negatively affect the course grade.

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 648, 04A. Advanced Legal Writing & Editing

Credits: 2 hours (Pass/Fail Only)

Instructor(s): Prof. Terrell

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam (take-home). 

Description: The basic content of the course is reflected in its required text: S. Armstrong & T. Terrell, Thinking Like a Writer: A Lawyer’s Guide to Writing and Editing (PLI 3d ed., 2008). A frequent misconception about this course is that it is merely an extension of your experience in LWRAP. It is not. It will instead often challenge you to reconsider approaches to writing guidance that you have may previously encountered.

The course consists of two components. First, everyone enrolled will meet once a week on Monday afternoon for 1 ½ hours, and that time will be consumed by lecture and review of numerous writing examples at every level of a document – from overall structure to sentences and word choice. Second, all students will be assigned to a small-group discussion section, administered by a “teaching assistant” who is a third-year who took this course last year. Those sessions will meet once a week for an hour, during which the course’s materials, and additional examples, will be discussed, and editing exercises will be assigned.

Although this is a “writing” course, it is unusual in that its emphasis will be on “editing” rather than original drafting. One of the keys to becoming a good writer is understanding how readers (for purposes of this course, that means you) react to documents written by others. That experience then yields important insights regarding the defects in one’s own prose, and how to cure them efficiently. To this end, the course will begin with some examination of deeper theories of communication, which will in turn allow the course to focus on fundamental writing “principles” rather than narrower “rules” or “tips.” The course will also analyze writing challenges from the “top down:” We will begin with issues of overall “macro” structure and organization and work down toward “micro” details. This class will not count towards satisfying your Upper Level Writing Requirement. 

*Updated as of Fall 2015

3 Sections:

Law 605, 04A. Alternative Dispute Resolution

Law 605, 05A. Alternative Dispute Resolution

Law 605, GRD. Alternative Dispute Resolution (JM/LLM only) 

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Allgood or Armstrong

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take Home (Armstrong & Allgood)

Description: This course will explore Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) with an emphasis on mediation. Course objectives are: 1) to develop both a theoretical and a practical understanding of available options and strategies for using them effectively in a legal practice; 2) to understand the ethical and legal implications of ADR; and 3) to develop a proficiency in dispute resolution processes other than litigation, including direct negotiation, mediation, and arbitration.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

2 Sections:

Law 560, 001. American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research I

Law 560, 002. American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research I

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Daspit, Nancy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This course introduces students to the concepts for legal analysis and the techniques and strategies for legal research, as well as the requirements and analytical structures for legal writing in the American common law legal system.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 560B, 000. American Legal Writing, Analysis, & Research II

NOTE: This class is open only to foreign-educated LLMs only

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Daspit 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This course continues the study of legal analysis, research, and writing for practice in the American common law system. The topics covered include client letters, pleadings, and persuasive writing, along with enhanced instruction covering legal citation and advanced legal research sources and techniques.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 590, 000. Analysis, Research and Communications for Non-Lawyers (JM)

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Daspit & Glon

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Regular Assignments & Final Project

Description: This course will provide an introduction to legal analysis, research and effective legal writing. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of legal analysis and the structure of legal information. Students will learn how to navigate multiple legal resources to discover legal authority appropriate for different types of legal analysis and communications. Students will learn the concepts of effective legal analysis and will develop the skills necessary to produce objective legal analyses.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 716, 10A. Bankruptcy

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Pardo, Rafael

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: An introduction to the law of bankruptcy. Covers issues relating to eligibility for bankruptcy; commencement of a bankruptcy case; administration of the bankruptcy estate; automatic stay and relief; use, sale or lease of property of the estate; assumption and rejection of executory contracts and leases; avoidance actions, including preference and fraudulent transfer litigation; appointment of trustees and examiners; and confirmation of a Chapter 11 plan. This course is a general survey course reviewing the basics of Chapter 7 liquidations, Chapter 13 wage-earner reorganizations and Chapter 11 business reorganizations.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 635D, 000. Barton Appeal for Youth Clinic

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Reba

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Group work (based on individual student)

Description: Students in the Appeal for Youth Clinic represent inmates serving lengthy sentences in Georgia’s prisons for offenses they allegedly committed as children. Students engage in habeas corpus and trial court litigation attacking inmates' convictions and sentences. Students should have an interest in criminal procedure, juvenile law, and/or social justice. 

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 635C, 000. Barton Child Law and Policy Clinic

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Carter

Prerequisite: Students must have taken or be concurrently enrolled in the two-credit class: Child Welfare Law & Policy. This requirement may be waived for students with demonstrable prior experience in child advocacy, including the Emory Summer Child Advocacy Program.

Grading Criteria: Group work (based on individual student)

Description: The Barton Clinic is an in-house legal policy clinic dedicated to providing research, training, and support to the public, the child advocacy community, and the legislature in Georgia. Students work on issues before the state legislature, complete research for publication, participate in local and statewide advocacy events, and help inform the discussion on child welfare issues with their own ideas or projects. Approximately 4-8 law and other graduate students are selected each semester to participate in the clinic.

Applications are accepted prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, list of 2 references, the name of his/her LWRAP Instructor, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

Detailed course information is on the Clinic web site: http://www.childwelfare.net 

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 762, 12A. Business and Tax Legal Research

ACCELERATED CLASS: OCTOBER 3, 2016-NOVEMBER 14, 2016

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Sneed

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Description: The purpose of Business and Tax Legal Research is to provide students with an introduction to business and tax related materials and advanced training on the finding and utilization of these materials for legal research purposes. Topics covered will include business forms, business filings and SEC research, and primary and secondary sources for tax issues.

This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the first seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 500X, 08A. Business Associations

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. G. Shepherd & Freer

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: A study of basic concepts in agency, partnership (general and limited), and corporation law. Topics include choice of business form, formation, organization, financing, and dissolution, as well as the fundamental rights and responsibilities of, and the allocation of power between, the business entity, its owners, management, and other stakeholders. The course also considers the special needs of closely held enterprises, basic issues in corporate finance, and the impact of federal and state laws and regulations governing the formation, management, financing, and dissolution of business enterprises.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 658, 000. Capital Defender Workshop

NOTE: Interested students must submit a letter of interest & resume to Josh Moore, Office of the Georgia Capital Defender jmoore@gacapdef.org »

NOTE: THIS WORKSHOP WILL REQUIRE A YEAR-LONG (two semester) COMMITMENT

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Moore, Josh

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation

Description: This is a three hour clinical course taught in partnership with the Office of the Georgia Capital Defender, the new state agency responsible for representing all indigent defendants statewide in capital cases at trial and on direct appeal. Second and third year law students from Emory, Georgia State, UGA, and Mercer will assist Capital Defender attorneys in all aspects of preparing their clients’ cases for trial. Students will become involved in fact investigations, witness interviewing, legal research and drafting, and general preparations for trials and sentencing hearings. The great opportunity students have in this clinic—as opposed to clinics that focus on the appeal and post-conviction stages—is to be involved in the effort to save lives on the front end, on “making the case for life.” That means students will focus at least as much on mitigation, fact investigation, and interpersonal skills as on death penalty law and advocacy skills.

*Updated as of Fall 2015

Law 635, 02A. Child Welfare Law and Policy

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Carter

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Grading Criteria: Attendance, court visit, participation, written and oral assignments

Description: This course will explore the various factors that shape public policy and perception concerning abused and neglected children, including: the constitutional, statutory, and regulatory framework for child protection; varying disciplinary perspectives of professionals working on these issues; and the role and responsibilities of the courts, public agencies and non-governmental organizations in addressing the needs of children and families. Through a practice-focused study, students will examine the evolution of the child protection system, including the emergence of the juvenile court, and critical issues such as legal representation of children, impact litigation and limits on governmental authority. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of legal, legislative, and policy measures as a response to child abuse and neglect and to appreciate the roles of various disciplines in the collaborative field of child advocacy. Through lecture, discussion, analytical writing and skills-based exercises, including legislative drafting and oral advocacy assignments, students will develop a fuller understanding of this specialized area of the law and the companion skills necessary to be an effective advocate.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016. 

Law 615, 000. Chinese Law 

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ruskola

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam (take-home).

Description: This course is an introduction to the comparative study of Chinese law and legal thought.  It starts by analyzing the tradition of imperial Chinese law and its theoretical foundations, and then turns to early twentieth-century law reforms and the introduction of socialist law and jurisprudence.  The course ends with the study of post-Mao law reforms and their implications for the future of Chinese law.  In addition to its substantive focus, the course considers methodological problems involved in the study of law across cultures.  Some of the general themes that run throughout the course include the following:   To what extent is law a useful analytical category in Sino-American comparison?   How is law related to capitalism and socialism, and to culture and socio-economic organization more generally?  How and why has Chinese law changed over time?  What happens when “Eastern” and “Western” legal cultures come in contact with each other?

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 860A, 02A. Colloquium Series Workshop

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Levine

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-colloquium-workshop-preselection-fall-2016/ 

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: Limited to 6 students only!

Grading Criteria: Weekly Papers

Description: Would you like a close-up look at the world of legal scholarship and the exchange of scholarly ideas? Are you seeking more engagement with the Emory Law faculty outside of the traditional classroom setting? Do you want to become a stronger writer? Have you ever thought you might want to become a law professor? If so, consider applying to the Colloquium Series Workshop (CSW).

Components of CSW: Students who participate in this two unit workshop attend two meetings each week: the weekly faculty colloquium, which meets on Wednesdays over the lunch hour (and includes lunch) and a one-hour class session run by Professor Kay Levine, on Friday mornings. During each of these one hour sessions, students discuss the colloquium work as a piece of scholarship (and as piece of persuasive writing), critique the author's presentation, and review materials relating to the production of scholarship and the legal academic job market. In advance of the weekly meeting, students write short reaction papers to each colloquium piece.

The CSW will be graded on a pass/fail basis, but with high attendance and participation standards set for what constitutes a passing grade. Do not apply for this class if you have other commitments during the lunch hour on Wednesdays (even only sporadic). Enrollment Students enroll in the CSW in accordance with the same procedures used for seminars (advance application during the pre-selection process). However, enrollment is limited to six students each semester, instead of the usual 15. On the pre-selection form please indicate the basis of your interest in the CSW and your prior experience with scholarship in an academic setting (law or otherwise).

*Updated as of 3/29/2016

Law 622A, 02A. Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Investigations

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Cloud

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam & Class Participation

Description: This course examines the constitutional rules governing criminal investigations, including searches and seizures, the interrogation of witnesses and suspects, and the roles played by prosecutors and defense attorneys during the investigative stages of criminal cases. The course studies the current constitutional rules governing these essential police practices, the development of these rules, and the relevant but conflicting policy arguments favoring efficient law enforcement and individual liberty that arise in these cases.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 675, 04A. Constitutional Litigation

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Weber Jr.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law (recommended) 

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: An exploration of the substantive, ethical and strategic issues involved in litigating civil rights actions. This course will allow students to both learn basic principles of governmental liability/defenses and apply their knowledge of torts, constitutional law and civil procedure in a litigation setting.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

2 Sections:

Law 959, 02A

Law 959, 02B

Courtroom Persuasion & Drama I 

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Metzger

Prerequisite: Evidence & Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Class work & Final Exam (during regularly scheduled class-time)

Strictly limited to 12 students

Class open only to 3Ls

Description: This course introduces students to basic acting, directing and writing tools a lawyer needs to motivate and persuade jurors, and applies these tools to courtroom performance. Using lectures, exercises, readings, individual performance and video playback, the course helps students develop concentration, observation skills, storytelling, spontaneity, and physical and vocal technique. Students also gain practical experience applying these tools to the presentation of openings and closings as well as questioning witnesses and jurors.

Students reflected on what they gained from taking this class:

"I think what is most drastically different is how much more professional I came across later in the semester."

-Ben S.

"The largest benefit I drew from our class was the ability to stand comfortably in front of a group of people."

-Diana S.

"The most valuable aspect is practice, practice, practice, especially when combined with live and individualized feedback. I can make presentations with significantly less internal anxiety than before, and with more organization and the outward appearance of credibility." -Andrew R.

"This class taught me that putting work into your speaking style can really pay off! I also found the freedom during this class to try some experiments with my speaking technique, including not memorizing a script and moving about my space." -Alan W.

*Updated as of Fall 2014. 

Law 622B. Criminal Procedure: Adjudication 

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Levine

Prerequisite: Criminal Law

Grading Criteria: Final Exam; 6-8 page paper; meritorious class participation.

Enrollment: Limited to 24 only!

Description: This course will examine how lawyers and judges behave in the criminal courts throughout the United States, as well as the legal doctrines implicated by their behavior. Topics include discovery, pre-trial detention, jury selection, prosecutorial charging and bargaining, ineffective assistance of counsel, double jeopardy, and speedy trial issues. Readings address material from law, sociology, history, and public policy. Students should note that this class has a strong sociology focus; it is not predominantly doctrinal.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 767, 09A. Cross Examination Techniques

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Lott & McCoyd

Prerequisite: Evidence and Trial Techniques required

Grading Criteria: Course work; in-classroom exercises; In-class exam (last day of class)

Enrollment: Limited to 40 students!

Description: This course is designed to conduct an exhaustive examination of the science and art of cross examination with extensive in class exploration and performance of advanced cross examination techniques.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 897

Law 897A

Law 898

Directed Research

Credits: 1-2 hours 

Instructor(s): Multiple

Prerequisite: None 

Grading Criteria: Based on supervising faculty's evaluations of Paper

Description: Directed research is an independent scholarly project of your own design, meant to lead to the production of an original work of scholarship. Once you have secured a faculty advisor and have defined your project, you should download the directed research form (see below). In this form, indicate whether you are seeking one unit (a 15 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.) or two units (a 30 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.).

Complete information and the application form are available on the Students-Only web page »

Law 659M, 04A. Doing Deals: Commercial Lending Transactions

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-transactional-law-capstone-courses-20162017/ 

Prerequisite: Business Associations, Contract Drafting, and Deal Skills (concurrent not okay)

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Description: This Course is designed to give the student an opportunity to (i) explore in depth a variety of secured transactions, recognizing the contrast to unsecured transactions, and the Credit(s)ors rights, remedies and benefits thereunder, (ii) understand the nature and corresponding requirements of secured transactions, including knowledge of, and familiarity with applicable regulations, statutes and rules, and (iii) engage, as counsel, in the representation of a “secured Credit(s)or” or “borrower”, in an actual secured transaction from beginning to end (the “Secured Transaction”) throughout the semester.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 659P, 05A. Doing Deals: Complex Restructuring and Distressed Acquisitions in Chapter 11

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Payne; Adjunct professor

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-transactional-law-capstone-courses-20162017/  

Prerequisite: Bankruptcy and Contract Drafting Prerequisite-Students seeking Credit(s) for a Capstone Class: Bankruptcy, Contract Drafting and Deal Skills. Students will complete some advanced exercises during the course.

Grading Criteria: Class participation (10-20%), in-class presentations (20-30%), out-of-class projects (transaction documents, memos, legal briefs, etc.) (20-30%), final pleadings and argument for the sale hearing (20-30%).

Description: This course will take students down the path of a complicated corporate restructuring and/or sale. During class time, students will learn the key features of a modern corporate restructuring and distressed sale, using a hypothetical company for illustrations. Students will also be asked to prepare and present in class one or more summaries/presentations regarding hot topics in the bankruptcy and restructuring world. Outside of class, students will assume the roles of various parties to the restructuring, such as debtor, lenders, key suppliers, key customers, private equity sponsor, and the like. The students will be asked by their “clients” (the instructors) to negotiate transaction terms and to draft definitive documents for various parts of the restructuring. The students will also be asked to prepare various bankruptcy-related transactional documents and pleadings, leading to a contested, bankruptcy court sale of the hypothetical company at the end of the course.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 659A, 04A. Doing Deals: Contract Drafting

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-doing-dealscontract-drafting/ 

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent okay)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: Students enrolled in Contract Drafting will learn how to analyze and draft contemporary commercial agreements.  While this course is of particular interest to students pursuing careers in transactional law, it is also useful to those who want to be litigators.

In this experiential course, students will learn to do the following:  identify the business purpose of each contract concept; translate the business deal into contract concepts; draft each of a contract’s parts; draft with clarity and without ambiguity; add value to a deal; work through the drafting process; and analyze, review, and comment on a contract.  Students will also discuss ethical and professional issues confronting contract drafters.

Through simulations, students will receive substantial experience reasonably similar to the experience of a lawyer drafting a contract for a client. 

The course grade will be based on specific drafting assignments and class participation.  The course will include multiple opportunities for student performance, feedback from the professor, and self-evaluation.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 659B. Doing Deals: Deal Skills

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Payne & Adjunct Professors 

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-doing-dealsdeal-skills/ 

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay); Contract Drafting (concurrent NOT okay)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: Deal Skills introduces students to business and legal issues common to commercial transactions.  Among the topics covered are client counseling and communication techniques; translation of a business deal into contract provisions; due diligence review of contracts and corporate records; transaction structure; actions by corporations and limited liability companies; basic financing issues; indemnification and other risk reduction techniques; transactional negotiations; and ethics and professionalism issues arising in a transactional context.

This experiential course will be conducted through in-class exercises, role-plays, oral reports, and lectures and will also include out-of-class drafting, due diligence, negotiation and other projects.  

Through simulations, students will receive substantial experience reasonably similar to the experience of a lawyer working on a transaction.

The course grade will be based on homework (including a comprehensive individual project), a negotiation project, and class participation.  The course will include multiple opportunities for student performance, feedback from the professor, and self-evaluation.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 659F, 06A. Doing Deals: General Counsel

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-transactional-law-capstone-courses-20162017/ 

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting (concurrent NOT okay) Prerequisite – Students seeking Credit(s) for a Capstone Class: Business Associations, Contract Drafting and Deal Skills (concurrent NOT okay).

Grading Criteria: Course work

Description: In this course, students will develop transactional skills, with emphasis on possible differences in roles of in-house counsel and outside counsel in the context of a hypothetical transaction that will be focal point of the entire semester. The class will be divided between the lawyers representing the buyer and the lawyers representing the seller. Students will interview the Professor (client) throughout the semester and develop goals, strategies, and documents that will meet the needs of the client.  The semester will include the drafting and negotiation of a confidentiality agreement, a letter of intent, an employment agreement, a Master Services Agreement, and a Stock Purchase Agreement.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 659N, 04A. Doing Deals: Intellectual Property Transactions

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Payne; Adjunct Professor

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-transactional-law-capstone-courses-20162017/ 

Prerequisite: Contract Drafting and Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Exercises, Class Participation, & Final Paper/Presentation

Description: This course is designed to offer students with an interest in intellectual property the opportunity to explore a limited number of current and cutting edge intellectual property topics in depth and to experience first-hand how these legal concepts would manifest in a transactional practice setting. Students will complete a variety of in-class and homework assignments typical of those encountered in a transactional IP practice, from contract negotiation and drafting to strategic analysis and client interaction. - The course is intended for students with an interest in this subject area; no specific prior IP courses are required, but if a student has not taken any other IP offerings, please contact the instructor for suggestions of materials to review over the summer. Grading is a combination of small projects, class participation, and a final paper/presentation. There is no exam. Students taking this course as a Capstone Course will complete some additional requirements over the course of the semester. Due of the nature of this course, regular attendance is mandatory!

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 659D, 04A. Doing Deals: Private Equity

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Crowley, Kevin; Furman, Kathryn

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-transactional-law-capstone-courses-20162017/ 

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting, Deal Skills, Corporate Finance, Accounting in Action or Analytical Methods

Grading Criteria: Several group and individual assignments; Mid-term; & Final Exam

Description: The course is designed as a workshop in which law students and business students will work together to structure and negotiate varying aspects of a private equity deal, from the initial term sheet stages, through execution of the purchase agreement, to completion of the financing and closing. Private equity deals that are economically justified, sometimes fail in the transaction negotiation and documentation phase. This course will seek to provide students with the tools necessary to tackle and resolve difficult deal issues and complete successful deals. Students will be divided into teams of lawyers and business people to review, consider and negotiate actual transaction documents. The issues presented will include often-contested key economic and legal deal terms, as well as common ethical dilemmas.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 808. Domestic Violence: U.S. Legal System's Response 

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Stolarski

Prerequisite: Evidence

Grading Criteria: Meritorious Class Participation; Reflection Essay; Modified Open-book In-class Final Exam

Enrollment: Limited to 16 students

Description: This course will examine the evolution of laws and policies addressing domestic violence and how the  justice system in the U.S. responds to this complex legal and social problem. While the course will lean more heavily towards criminal law, it will also explore some key areas of civil law that impact a survivor's ability to safely end an abusive relationship. Topics will include but are not limited to: the dynamics of abuse; how the experience of abuse and the legal system's response to it are shaped by cross-cultural factors; the impact of domestic violence on children and the use of children as witnesses; civil protective orders, divorce and child custody;  housing, employment and immigration issues; criminal charging decisions and evidence-based prosecution techniques;  the use of expert witnesses; and  victims who are charged as criminal defendants.  This will be an interactive course with classroom discussions, guest speakers and opportunities for skill-based exercises to reinforce keys points of learning.  Materials and discussions will draw from legal, sociological, and public policy lenses.  Though students with an interest in criminal and family law will be particularly interested in these topics, the course is designed to equip students with a broad base of knowledge needed to identify, evaluate and responsibly respond to the issues of domestic violence that they are likely to encounter as practicing lawyers, regardless of the area of specialty they may choose to enter.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 745, 000. DUI Trials

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Tatum

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Participation and Final Trial Simulation

Description: One of the most complicated and technical cases to try in criminal law is a DUI charge. Learning how to present or defend a DUI can equip a new litigator with techniques that will benefit students seeking practice in all areas of criminal litigation. Students will review DUI statutes and case law and prepare simulation cases for motions and trial. Opening arguments, direct, cross, and closing argument will be discussed and practiced. Introduction of scientific evidence, expert testimony, and preparing your witness for trial will be explored. Motions will be prepared and decided. Students will prepare and present their final case in a trial setting at the end of the semester.

*Updatd as of Fall 2015

Law 611, 000. Election Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kang

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: This course provides an introduction to the law of the democratic political process.  The course will cover a wide range of topics, including the right to vote, reapportionment and redistricting, partisan and racial gerrymandering, the Voting Rights Act, campaign finance, the role of political parties, direct democracy, and Bush v. Gore.  The course will examine the principles underlying the design of our political institutions and legal frameworks, as well as the practical implications of those choices, drawing on political science and developments in contemporary politics.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

4870; Catalog Number- Law 669X, 06A

Credit: 1 Hour  (This class meets for 2 hours every other week. The dates will be announced during the first week of class.)

Instructor(s): Prof. Shultz & Prof. King

Prerequisite: Employment Discrimination or Employment Law

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Enrollment: (cap of 8 students)

Description: The class will work though an employment law case from meeting the client to a mock jury trial. The students will be divided into 2 law firms. One firm represents the Plaintiff and the other firm represents the Defendant. The classes are lead by Chad Shultz and Carlton King Jr., but this is an interactive class that encourages group discussion and student participation. The written assignments will include a demand letter (Plaintiff’s firm), a response to the demand letter (defense); summary judgment brief and reply (simplified and limited to no more than 8 pages). Each student will also participate in deposing a witness, argue the motion for summary judgment, and play a role in the trial of the case. This is a hands-on class that will allow you prosecute and defend an employment case from start to finish.

3 Sections:

Law 668, 000. Employment Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Weirich

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: This two-hour course will cover many of the major legal aspects of the employment relationship not treated in Labor Law. We will examine legal principles applicable to the hiring process, the key terms and conditions of employment (including wages, hours, employee benefits, and workplace conduct), employment discrimination (a brief survey, not intended as a substitute for the separate course on that subject), occupational safety and health, employment termination (including termination for cause and through force reduction), and post-employment issues (restrictive covenants and trade secrets, unemployment insurance, and post-employment benefits).

*Updated as of Fall 2015. 

Law 697, 04A. Environmental Advocacy Workshop

COURSE REQUIRED FOR ALL STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE TURNER ENVIRONMENTAL LAW CLINIC. THIS COURSE DOES NOT MEET THE WRITING REQUIREMENT.

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Goldstein & Horder, Rick

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Workshop Projects, Simulations, and Classroom Participation

Description: The Environmental Advocacy workshop will include reading assignments, written exercises, seminar-like discussion, and simulations with an emphasis on legal practice. The course will develop students' abilities to function as successful environmental advocates in the context of client interviews, administrative proceedings, negotiations, and litigation. Other issues covered include advocating environmental protection.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 620, 000. European Union Law I

Credits: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Mickevicius & Prof. Tulibacka

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam (60%), Short assignments (30%), Participation (10%)

Description: The largest trade and investment relationship in the world, overlapping geopolitical concerns, and crucial shared values make the European Union one of the United States most important partners economically, politically, and socially. Lawyers, public servants, and activists are consequently being called upon to engage (and understand) European legal principles and practices to an ever-growing degree. With that in mind, this course will examine the theoretical fundamentals of the EU legal system and their practical applications. We will begin by reviewing the history of the European Communities and the genesis of the European Union. This will be followed by an analysis of the constitutional framework of the EU, including its political and legal nature, its aims and guiding values, membership and the division of powers between the EU and the Member States, institutional makeup and the allocation of powers across its major institutions, sources and forms of EU law, lawmaking, recent developments in the protection of fundamental rights, and the structure and role of the EU judicial system. Building on the latter, we will then turn to the EU model of judicial review and the complex interaction between the EU and national legal systems in enforcing EU law.

Classes will combine lectures and interactive sessions where students will explore the caselaw of the Court of Justice of the European Union and national courts of Member States, analyze hypothetical cases, solve problems, and assess relevant political and legal developments.

Law 632X, 12A

Law 632X, 13A

Evidence

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Goldfeder & Seaman 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: A general consideration of the law of evidence with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Coverage includes relevance, hearsay, witnesses, presumptions and burdens of proof, writings, scientific and demonstrative evidence, and privilege. Must be taken in the second year.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 678. The Evolution of the Legal Practice & Law Practice Economics, 1945-2015

Credits: 2 hours 

Instructor(s): Prof. Trotter, Mike

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final exam (take-home).

Description: This course will examine the major changes that have occurred since the end of World War II in how legal services are provided in the United States, why these changes have occurred, and their effect on lawyers, law firms, law departments, and on clients and others in need of legal services. The important changes to be examined include:

1)Growth in the need for legal services.

2)Increases in the number of lawyers in the United States relative to its population.

3)Changes in the size and operations of law firms and law departments, and their relationship to one another.

4)The economics of providing legal services, and the compensation of legal service providers.

5)The personnel composition of law firms and law departments including the increased utilization of unlicensed billable personnel to support the delivery of legal services.

6)The regulation and ethical requirements of legal service providers.

7)The commoditization of some legal services.

8)The impact of technology on the provision of legal services.

9)The education and training of lawyers.

10)Relationships of lawyers with their clients.

11)The diversity of service provider personnel.

12)Issues relating to Alternative Legal Service Providers and limited license personnel.

This course will provide a foundation for the examination of the future challenges and prospects of the legal profession.

“Classes will start the week of September 12, 2016, and will meet twice a week for the remaining 10 weeks of the semester.”

*Updated as of 8/17/2016

Law 870. Externship Program

Credits: Varies

Instructor(s): Multiple

Selection: Application process submitted to Prof. Shalf

Grading Criteria: Class Participation & Fieldwork

Description: Step outside the classroom and learn to practice law from experienced attorneys. Take the skills and principles you learn in the classroom and learn how they apply in practice. Emory Law's General Externship Program provides work experience in different types of practice (all sectors except law firms) so you can determine which suits you best and develop relationships that will continue as you begin your legal career. Students are supported in their placements by a weekly class meeting with other students in similar placements, taught by faculty with practice experience in that area, in which students have the opportunity to learn legal and professional skills they need to succeed in the externship, receive mentoring independent of their on-site supervisors, and to step back and reflect on their experience and what they are learning from it.

Our Small Firm Externship Program provides students specially interested in the small law firm practice setting with experience in specially-selected small law firms. The firms' attorneys participate with the students in our weekly class meeting, which focuses on the skills and attributes necessary to succeed in a small firm practice setting.

Students apply for externships via Symplicity in the semester prior to the externship and all placements must be preapproved. Available placements for the General program are listed on the Emory Law website, http://law.emory.edu/academics/academic-programs/externships/externship-search.html, and the currently-participating Small Firms are listed here: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/small-firm-externship-applicant-law-firm-ranking/

Warning: No student is allowed to be enrolled in more than one clinic, workshop, or externship classes (except fieldwork) in a semester.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 870K. Landlord-Tenant Mediation Workshop

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Powell, Bonnie

Selection: Application process submitted to Prof. Shalf

Description: See Below. 

Landlord-Tenant Mediation Workshop students will mediate landlord/tenant disputes, including cases handled in the Magistrate and State courts; particularly small claim civil issues such as disputes between landlords and tenants. Assuming an agreement is reached during mediation, students will be responsible for drafting a detailed settlement agreement.

Students work under the supervision of an attorney mediating cases that deal with numerous issues of law within the court system. Prior to mediating, students will receive 28 hours of civil mediation training and will be registered as neutrals with the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution

Required Mediation Training

Training is provided by the program and will occur the first or second week in August; attendance for the entire 28 hours of training is mandatory. Training dates will be confirmed no later than June 1.

These hours may be used later in the semester to compensate for any necessary time away.  For example if a student has to leave at 5:00 pm for an evening class, 30/45 minutes of training can be used as a filler.     

For those who need a more flexible schedule, there is also now a partnership with Dekalb County so students can mediate there as well. The hours there are a bit different and has more flexibility.

Enrollment

This is a full academic year, two-semester workshop. Students must enroll in both the fall and spring semesters. Second- and third-year students may apply. An in-person interview will be scheduled with the supervising attorney.

  • Application Period: Resumes can be submitted through Symplicity at the same time externships accept resumes.
  • Required Background Check: Upon acceptance, a criminal background check by the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution will be conducted.

Class Times

  • Students must be available to go to court from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. or 12:45 to 5:45 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.
  • Weekly seminar sessions will take place at the courthouse during the semester.
Law 643, 12A. Family Law II

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Broyde

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Deals with the problems, policies, and laws related to the dissolution of children and parents. Juvenile Law will also be considered.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 721, 000. Federal Courts

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Smith, Fred

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: This course deals with the allocation of judicial business between the state and federal courts, as well as the jurisdictional tensions that arise from a dual judicial system. In addition, the course considers the relationship between the federal judiciary and Congress, particularly as it implicates legislature's power to structure and limit the federal courts' subject matter jurisdiction. This is a very practical course, as well as one that implicates important theoretical issues about decision-making institutions under our federal system of government.

*Updated as of Fall 2015. 

Law 626. Federal Indian Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Saunooke, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam

Description: This course offers an overview of federal Indian law and policy, including historical developments related to federal treaties with Indian tribes and the Indian Termination Act. We will discuss current law and policy regarding Indian self-determination, gaming, sovereign and constitutional issues, and the varied and complex jurisdictional considerations involving criminal and civil laws that impact, affect, and otherwise intertwine Indian tribes, states and the federal government.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 760, 06A. Federal Prosecution Practice

Credits: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Grimberg

Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure & Evidence recommended, but not required

Grading Criteria: In-class exercises and Take-home Written Assignments; Take-home Final

Enrollment: Limited to 14 students only

Description: This class will explore the powers, principles, and responsibilities that come with serving as a federal prosecutor. Class segments will focus on the day-to-day responsibilities of federal prosecutors throughout the various stages of the criminal justice system. We will discuss the motivating factors that guide federal prosecution decisions in light of legal, policy, practical and ethical considerations. The class will involve a mix of lecture and “learn by doing” exercises that will be geared towards developing your analytical, oral and written advocacy skills.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 601, 001. The First Amendment: Religious Liberty

Credits: 3 Credits (1 Additional Credit- Lab Option)

Instructor(s): Prof. Witte **Cross-Listed with School of Theology**

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final exam (take-home).

Description: Religious liberty is one of the hallmarks of modern constitutional democracies, though it has come under considerable attack in recent years. This course analyzes the historical formation and current interpretation of the religious liberty guarantees of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. Part I of the course explores the original meaning of the First Amendment guarantees of no establishment and free exercise of religion viewed in colonial and broader Western context. Part II analyzes the guarantees of free exercise and expression of religion guaranteed by First Amendment free exercise and free speech clauses and recent complementary statutes. Topics include religious liberty claims to polygamy, proselytism, Sabbath day observance, religious worship, ritual, and dress, and claims by religious individuals and groups to exemptions from general laws. Part III traces the requirements of no establishment of religion, particularly in cases concerning the role of religion in public education, the place of government in religious education, and the place of religious symbols and ceremonies in public and political life. Part IV analyzes the complex relationships between religious organizations and government. Topics include tax funding and exemptions for religious groups, the powers and limits of religious organizations to resolve their own internal disputes over polity and property, and their power to discipline their leaders and members for their beliefs, moral behavior, or sexual orientation.

The readings will consist of selected United States Supreme Court cases and a textbook, John Witte, Jr. and Joel A. Nichols, Religion and the American Constitutional Experiment, 4th ed. (Oxford University Press, 2016).

There will be a final take home examination, handed out the last class of the semester. The exam will offer a choice of three or four questions that explore different major course themes; students will pick one question and prepare a 3000 word answer based on their course notes and readings. The course can be taken for graded or pass/fail credit. The course has no prerequisites, and does not presuppose detailed knowledge of American history or constitutional law.

1 Additional Hour Lab Option: This course offers a supplemental 1 credit hour laboratory comparing United States Supreme Court and European Court of Human Rights cases on religious freedom. This lab consists of 14 hours of lectures and discussion in November, led by Professor Witte and Visiting Professor Andrea Pin of the University of Padua.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 680, 04A. Food & Drug Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kitchens

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Food and drug law involves the statutory and regulatory framework governing the development and marketing of food, drugs, medical devices, biological products, and cosmetics. This introductory course serves as a starting point for understanding how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration attempts both to protect the public health and foster our national desire and need for innovation in science, medicine and the safety of our food supply. In particular, the course will study how FDA and the courts have enforced and interpreted the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act to implement a regulatory system for a wide range of products that affect our daily lives. Dialogue and questions on how food and drug law has confronted and adapted to scientific and technological progress, public health challenges, constitutional controversies, and policy-based perspectives will be encouraged. Additionally, the course covers such contemporary issues as food safety; balancing the benefits and risks of certain drugs, devices and biological products and how best to communicate that information to healthcare professionals and consumers; expediting approval of drugs designed for life-threatening diseases; clinical trials for experimental products; and regulation of biotechnology, such as tissue engineering and gene therapy. Other specific topics include: regulation of food labeling and sanitation; regulation of dietary supplements; administrative rulemaking; advertising and promotion controls; preemption of state laws; and strategies for handling government investigations and enforcement actions.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 650, 04A. Franchise Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Aronson

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Legal and business considerations, including the pros and cons of franchising; the franchising role in the economy; the franchiser/franchisee relationship; disclosure requirements; relevant state and federal laws; essential elements in representing franchisers and franchisees; basic terms and issues with franchise agreements; legislative issues; trademark issues; encroachment issues; system expansion issues; franchisee associations; new techniques in franchising; e.g. area development agreements, sub-franchising, niche franchising, master franchise agreements; international franchising; the role of alternate dispute resolution in franchising; product quality issues; legislative issues. Case studies of important franchise companies will be read and evaluated including Holiday Inns, McDonald's, Century 21, Pizza Hut and Dunkin Donuts. Prominent legal political and business franchising representatives will be guest speakers.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 640X, 000. Fundamentals of Income Taxation

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Pennell

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Midterm & Final Exam

Description: Introductory study of the general structure of the federal income tax; nature of gross income, exclusions, and deductions; the income tax consequences of property transactions; the nature of capital gains and losses; basis and non-recognition.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 736B, 000. Global Public Health Law

Credits: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Brady, Rita-Marie

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation, Pre-assigned case study presentation, and Final Paper

Description:As events of the past year have demonstrated, diseases are permeable and public health issues do not arise neatly within borders. This course will use foundational legal principles of international and domestic law, as well as international regulatory frameworks, guidelines, and their respective actors, and apply them to global public health issues. This will be accomplished using interactive case studies and simulations that require multi-disciplinary classroom interaction, skill sets, source materials, and perspectives. Specific topics of focus will include (but not be limited to): infectious disease (particularly lessons learned from Ebola in 2014), environmental health, humanitarian law and public health emergencies, human rights and health, injury, and tobacco control. Guest speakers/presenters may be incorporated, but the format will focus on short foundational lectures, followed by either small-group case study break-outs and/or large group (in most instances pre-assigned) case study presentations, with a focus on multi-disciplinary interaction and actors.

*Updated as of Fall 2015. 

Law 657D, 000. Health Law Research

ACCELERATED CLASS OCTOBER 3, 2016-NOVEMBER 14, 2016

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Glon

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: No Exam; Research Assignments

Description: Health law encompasses a wide variety of topics ranging from Medicare to patient care, insurance companies to health care reform, big pharm to worker’s compensation, and medical malpractice to bioethics. Additionally, health law is governed by statutes, regulations and case law, and many health laws have produced a vast amount of legislative history materials. The field of health law research is robust and the class touches on best practices for researching topics such as:

  • Health Care Legislation and Regulations
  • Patient Care, Representing Physicians, and Regulations of Hospitals,
  • Medical Malpractice litigation
  • Medicare and Medicaid Issues, and
  • Elder Law, End of Life Decisions, and Bioethics.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 690B, 000. Human Rights Advocacy

Requires department consent.  Please click here to indicate your interest in the course and verify that you have met the course prerequisite.

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ludsin

Prerequisite: Human Rights or International Law Course

Grading Criteria: Research reports, Class participation, Presentations

Enrollment: Limited to 8 students only

Description: Human rights organizations and human rights lawyers play essential roles in protecting and promoting human rights, the rule of law and democracy, both at home and abroad. They expose injustices and demand accountability for them; they pressure governments to fulfill their democratic and human rights obligations; and often they give voice to the voiceless and marginalized. This course will start with a brief overview of international human rights law and then will be divided between lectures focusing on developing the skills of budding human rights lawyers, examining the anatomy of a human rights campaign, and highlighting the ethical dilemmas and barriers to change human rights lawyers regularly face. To reinforce these lessons, each student will be assigned a research project on an issue supplied by human rights organizations from across the globe. Last year's participating organizations included CARE, The Carter Center, The Women’s Legal Centre (South Africa), the Centre for Policy Alternatives (Sri Lanka) and the US Human Rights Network.

The course is 3 credits and will require either several short written projects or one larger research report for an organization (75%), along with a series of project-related small assignments to show the student's progress (25%). It will be limited to 8 students who have completed an international law or human rights law course.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 731, 000. Immigration Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. McGrath, Kerry

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Final Exam

DescriptionA study of the immigration, nationality, and naturalization laws of the United States; discussion of policy issues relating to migration, refugees, asylum, deportation, English-only movements, and citizenship issues.

Law 609L. International Commercial Arbitration

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Reetz

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam; Class Participation

Description: A consideration of arbitration as a dispute resolution process in the domain of international commerce. Analyzes the composition and the jurisdiction of arbitral tribunals, the procedure followed by arbitrators, recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards, and other related issues. In order to understand the arbitral process, the class will systematically go though an arbitration from drafting the arbitration agreement (start) to enforcement of the award (finish). We will discuss ad hoc and institutional arbitration by the use of a hypothetical case. This class will be very hands on and practical. Participation is important and there will be role-play. As international commercial arbitration cannot exist in a legal vacuum, we will also consider relevant laws in various civil law and common law countries.

*Updated as of Fall 2014

Law 653, 10A. International Criminal Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Van der Vyver

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Paper

Description: On Wednesday, March 14, 2012, the International Criminal Court (ICC) delivered its very first judgment. Thomas Lubanga Dyilo was convicted of the war crime of conscripting or enlisting persons under the age of fifteen years into the armed forces of a militant group, and using such persons to participate actively in hostilities. Lubanga was the founder and leader of the Union of Congolese Patriots responsible for violence that erupted in 2002 in Ituri, an eastern province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, between the Hema and Lendu ethnic groups. The situation in Ituri was referred to the ICC by the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the Lubanga Case, several complicated issues came up in the course of the pre-trial proceedings, which commenced when a warrant for the arrest of Lubanga was issued by a Pre-Trial Chamber of the ICC in February 10, 2006: Was the conflict in Ituri an international armed conflict or one not of an international character? Is there a difference between the enlistment or conscription of child soldiers if committed in an international armed conflict or in an armed conflict not of an international character, respectively? What degree of knowledge (mens rea) is required on the part of the perpetrator in regard to the age of a person enlisted or conscripted into the armed forces or used to participate actively in the hostilities? What is the meaning of using a child soldier “to participate actively in hostilities”? The trial and tribulations that attended the pre-trail proceedings in the Lubanga Case also included interesting issues of criminal procedure: The duty of the Prosecutor to obtain evidence for the defense; the effect of (non-) compliance with municipal (Congolese) laws in regard to searches and seizures; requirements to be satisfied for a person to qualify as a “victim” and the right of victims to express their “views and concerns” in the investigation stage of the proceedings.

These problems and questions are some of the substantive issues included in International Criminal Law. The focus of the course is on the structures and proceedings of the ICC. The ICC Statute was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference of Diplomatic Plenipotentiaries on an International Criminal Court, which was held in Rome on June 15 through July 17, 1998. Following 60 ratifications of the ICC Statute, the ICC became a reality on July 1, 2002 with its seat in The Hague in the Netherlands. To date, the ICC Statute has been ratified by 122 States. Earlier, the Security Council of the United Nations established the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), and subsequently offered its support for a Special Court to prosecute international crimes committed in Sierra Leone (SCSL), and for judicial chambers to bring perpetrators of international crimes in East Timor and Cambodia to justice. Jurisprudence of the ICTY, ICTR and SCSL, as well as cases decided by the NurembergTribunals, are included in the course.

The course also includes an overview of the history of the establishment of the international tribunals; and as far as the ICC is concerned, its subject-matter, territorial, personal and temporal jurisdiction; the composition of the ICC and its organs; trigger mechanisms for prosecutions in the ICC (the U.N. Security Council, States Parties, and the Prosecutor conducting investigations proprio motu); and the rules of admissibility of a case (the principle of complementarity). When dealing with the definitions of crimes within the subject-matter jurisdiction of the Court (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression), we shall single out certain crimes for closer scrutiny, for example the crime of genocide, gender-specific crimes, child soldiers, torture, environmental malpractice, resettlement of populations in occupied territories, and terrorism. In dealing with the rules of procedure and evidence to be applied in the ICC, special attention will be given to international principles of criminal justice that are at odds with the American criminal law and criminal procedure, for example the concept of mens rea, the presumption of innocence, the rule against double jeopardy, the protection of victims, and sentencing factors. Special attention will also be given to the ongoing conflict between the African Union and the ICC over the indictment of President Al Bashir of Sudan and President Kenyatta and Deput President Ruto of Kenya to stand trial in the ICC centered upon the (non-) applicability of sovereign immunity of a sitting head of state. The United States was one of seven States that voted against approval of the ICC Statute. The course includes concerns of the United States and others (including Israel, India, and some Arab States) that prompted a negative vote or abstention. President Clinton did sign the ICC Statute. The Bush administration, on the other hand, adopted a particular hostile attitude toward the ICC, for example by cancelling the American signature of the ICC Statute, enacting the Military Service members Protection Act of 2002, and imposing sanctions against States that refused to enter into bilateral agreements with the United States that would preclude them from surrendering American nationals for prosecution in the ICC. In 2009, the Obama administration re-engaged with The ICC and the United States is currently a “co-operating non-party State”.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 676C. International Humanitarian Law Clinic

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Blank

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: International Law, International Humanitarian Law, International Criminal Law, International Human Rights, Counter-terrorism Law

Grading Criteria: Group discussions & Assignments (based on individual student work)

Description: The International Humanitarian Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to do real-world work on issues relating to international law and armed conflict, counter-terrorism, national security, transitional justice and accountability for atrocities. Students work directly with organizations, including international tribunals, militaries and non-governmental organizations, under the supervision of the Director of the IHL Clinic, Professor Laurie Blank. The IHL Clinic also includes a weekly class seminar with lecture and discussion introducing students to the foundational framework of and contemporary issues in international humanitarian law (otherwise known as the law of armed conflict).

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 732. International Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Van der Vyver

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Introduction to the law, methodology, and institutions of modern public international law. Among the topics covered are sources of international law jurisdiction, sovereign and diplomatic immunity, treaties, the domestic application of international law, the law of international organizations, settlement of disputes, limits on the use of force, human rights, and the law of the sea.

*Updated as of Fall 2015. 

Law 738. International Law & Ethics

Credits: 3 hours

Instructors: Prof. Holzgrefe, Jeff

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Essays, Class Participation

Description: In today's increasingly globalized world, international law is more important than ever.  The goal of this course is to introduce students to this body of law and to examine it critically from the perspectives of legal positivism, realism and cosmopolitanism.  Topics covered include: the subjects and sources of international law; international law enforcement (domestic incorporation, international courts, universal jurisdiction, sovereign immunity and armed force); the law of armed conflict (self-defense, preventive war, humanitarian intervention, guerrilla warfare, terrorism and counter-terrorism, perfidy, defensive armed reprisals); and collective and human rights (self-determination and secession, forced migration and asylum, subsistence and economic development, and the global environment).

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 761, 02A. International Legal Research

ACCELERATED CLASS AUGUST 15, 2016-SEPTEMBER 26, 2016.

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Flick

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Description: The course will introduce specialized techniques for research with international legal materials. Students will become familiar with international legal research sources through lectures and by practical application through in-class exercises and a final research project. Topics will include public international law resources, including U.S. and multilateral treaties, international courts, and customary law sources; documents of the United Nations, the European Union, and other inter-governmental organizations; resources on international human rights; an overview of legal materials for common law systems (the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia) and civil law systems (France and Latin America); and a look at issues that arise in international law research, including availability, translations, and Internet resources. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 639, 000. International Tax

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Harvel, Brian; Harty, Scott; & Kaywood, Sam

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax (concurrent NOT okay)

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: With improved communications and transportation "making the world smaller", it is becoming increasingly difficult to find businesses that do not engage in some form of international commerce. International Taxation is a course aimed at the tax consequences of international transactions. The class will not be targeted solely at those who would be tax lawyers. Those who anticipate a commercial practice after law school should find value in this course. It is difficult to be an effective business lawyer without some understanding of the tax laws. The course focuses on the application of the federal income tax and tax treaties to nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and to United States citizens, residents and corporations, investing funds abroad or conducting business with foreign persons.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 631A, 06A. Internet Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Nodine

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property, Copyright, or Trademark strongly recommended as a significant portion of the class will employ these principles. Co-requisites okay.

Grading Criteria: Midterm & Final Exam

Description: In this course we will wrestle with some of the most fascinating emerging issues in our evolving cyber-society. We will begin by considering jurisdiction over Internet disputes. We will then turn to intellectual property topics, including trademarks (whether "keyword buys" constitute infringement; domain name disputes) and copyright (music downloading and hyper-linking). There will be special focus on arbitration procedures for resolving domain name disputes (the “UDRP”) and the liability of intermediaries like eBay or YouTube for user infringement. The Course will also explore the right to privacy in cyberspace.

*Updated as of Fall 2015. 

Law 570A, LLM. Introduction to the American Legal System

NOTE: OPEN ONLY TO FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS & JM STUDENTS

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Final Exam

JM DescriptionThis course covers the Constitutional principles and governmental structures that shape the American legal system.  It examines the structure of the U.S. judicial system and basic principles of legal reasoning.  The course also incorporates a series of guest lectures in the primary areas of first-year legal study (contracts, torts, etc.).

LLM Description: This course covers the constitutional principles, history, and governmental structures that shape the American legal system.  Designed for lawyers trained outside of the United States, the course introduces basic principles of federalism, common-law reasoning, and an overview of the primary areas of first-year legal study

*Updated as of 06/27/2016.

Law 670, 10A. Jurisprudence 

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Terrell. **Crosslisted with Theology and the Philosophy Department**

Prequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Mid-term Essay & Final Exam Essay (take-home)

Description: This course is about normative disagreement:  disputes about values and systems of values, and in the political realm, quarrels over rights and duties.  But the course is not, as you might expect, about how to avoid or resolve discord and conflict, and thus bring us together in harmony around a shared sense of justice.  Instead, it will celebrate our contentious spirit, demonstrating that controversies about how we should govern ourselves are in fact inevitable, unavoidable, and never-ending. 

But this is not bad news.  Disagreement is not, as most seem to assume, inexorably disagreeable.  In fact, for lawyers, it should be appreciated, perhaps even celebrated, for fun and profit.

And this good news is not nearly as cynical as it might appear.  Law itself, after all, is a monument to the inability of people to get along productively without limits and direction.  But this course goes deeper, as it explores the next disconcerting step:  What happens when we also disagree about the limits and directions themselves that are supposed to help us avoid disputes in the first place (and settle them once they arise) – that is, when we disagree about the nature of legal guidance itself?  In the toughest cases you will face, the dispute will actually go underneath traditional elements of law, like court decisions and statutes, to the values that give these sources authoritative life.  Confronting those questions is indeed advanced legal reasoning – it requires a “philosophy of law” that somehow makes one legal argument stronger than another.  That level of the legal game is “jurisprudence.”

The course will consist of two overlapping pieces.  The first will examine the foundations of legal reasoning in challenging, controversial circumstances (the focus will be on Terrell, The Dimensions of Legal Reasoning, Carolina Academic Press, 2016).  Because those fundamentals inevitably involve normative values, the second part of the course will explore various philosophical perspectives within political and legal theory (e.g., John Stuart Mill, John Rawls, Ronald Dworkin, Robert Nozick, Drucilla Cornell, and others).

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 699C, 000. Juvenile Defender Clinic

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Waldman

Prerequisite: Priority will be given to students who have taken or are currently enrolled in: Kids in Conflict with the Law, Juvenile Law or Family Law 2; Criminal Procedure; and Evidence.

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance 

Description: The Juvenile Defender Clinic is an in-house legal clinic dedicated to providing holistic legal representation for children charged with delinquency and status offenses.   Student attorneys represent clients in juvenile court and provide legal advocacy in school discipline, special education and mental health matters, when such advocacy is derivative of a client's juvenile court case.  

Under the supervision of the clinic's director, Randee Waldman, student attorneys are responsible for handling all aspects of client representation. While in the clinic, JDC students will: Establish an attorney-client relationship with their client(s); Direct case strategy determinations; Investigate allegations; Interview witnesses; Negotiate dispositions and plea agreements; Prepare and litigate motions, and Try cases.

Students are also encouraged to engage in research and participate in juvenile justice policy development.

Applications are accepted via Symplicity or e-mail to professor Waldman prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 699, 04A. Kids in Conflict with the Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Waldman

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Grades will be based upon (i) a short reaction paper, (ii) an in-class advocacy exercise and (iii) a final research paper.

Description: The 2-credit course is a detailed study of the juvenile delinquency system. This course will trace the trajectory of juvenile justice in the United States over the course of the last century, from its birth as a separate system in the early 1900s, through the due process revolution of the 1960s and 1970s and the widespread punitive reforms of the 1990s, to the recent rulings on the juvenile death penalty. It will explore critical issues such as search, seizure, and interrogation of minors; waiver from juvenile to adult court; the unique procedural mechanisms of juvenile courts; sentencing and confinement; and implications of emerging scientific research on adolescent development. Finally, the course will also explore the relationship between the juvenile delinquency and school systems. Classes will consist of lecture, discussion, and advocacy exercises. This course is open to all 2Ls and 3Ls, and is a pre- or co-requisite for entry into the Barton Juvenile Defender Clinic.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 651, 000. Labor Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Wilson

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Focuses primarily on the National Labor Relations Act and its interpretation, including the prospect of reform legislation. Coverage also will include other matters such as regulation of globalization and preemption, and brief comparisons of the NLRA to the Railway Labor Act.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 708,000. Law and Religion: Theories, Methods, and Approaches

Credits: 2-4 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Allard

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Weekly reflections; 2 short papers; In-class presentation; Exam type - Paper

Description: Interdisciplinary scholarship is often lauded for challenging assumptions, contributing new perspectives, and leading to groundbreaking new insights that would not be possible without crossing disciplinary borders. While there are certainly benefits to interdisciplinary scholarship, such approaches also pose a unique set of challenges. The success of interdisciplinary scholarship depends on the scholar’s ability to communicate to audiences who often use different nomenclature, evidence, and analytical methods. A failure to appreciate these challenges can lead to attempts at interdisciplinary scholarship that are reductive, one-sided, vague, or confused.

In this course, students will survey the interdisciplinary field of law and religion. The course will begin by discussing the nature of the field known as law and religion. What areas of inquiry constitute this field? What do we mean when we talk  about “law” and “religion”? The course will then cover different substantive areas and methodological approaches by reading, analyzing, and critiquing examples of law and religion scholarship from leading scholars. Students will be asked to think about the choices that scholars make: What is the relationship of law and religion in this example of scholarship? What does the scholar draw on as evidence for her argument? How does the scholar construct his argument? How does the scholar think about law? How does the scholar think about religion? These and other questions will help students understand how different approaches function; what they can achieve; what they cannot achieve; and why a scholar would choose a certain approach. By the conclusion of the course, students will (1) understand the scope and subjects covered by the field of law and religion, (2) develop an understanding of different methodological approaches to the study of law and religion, and (3) be prepared to use different methodological approaches in their own writing. This course is recommended for students in advance of a significant writing project in law and religion, including a journal comment, major seminar paper, or thesis.

Course requirements include weekly reflections on the readings, an in-class presentation, and two 10-15 page papers. There are no prerequisites for this course. 

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

628B. Law,Sustainability, and Development

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Atieno Samandari

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam

Description:This course examines the role of law and the legal system in economic and social development, with a focus on developing countries and emerging markets. It will explore how law, in its various forms, may bring about or impede development, however defined, and how development may affect or change the legal system of the country concerned. International organizations, foreign aid agencies, and local and international nongovernmental organizations have become extraordinarily active in this field, spending hundreds of millions of dollars every year. The conceptions of development that underlie those efforts are diverse – development may be seen as growth or improvement in, among other things, income, education, health, and human rights. We will take a similarly expansive view of “law,” recognizing that in many contexts it blurs into politics, governance, and social custom. The course will seek to challenge conventional approaches to law and development and enhance the appreciation of the point of view of developing countries and marginalized communities regarding development.

The course will begin by interrogating the concept of ‘development’ and some of the problems that it encompasses. We will then explore the role of law and how/whether it may be used as an effective instrument for developing and implementing solutions to development problems. The course will cover a broad (but by no means exhaustive) set of issues in law and development and will take a critical perspective and include growing awareness of the importance of sustainability in development. 

Law 715, 000. Law & The Unconscious Mind

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Duncan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: How can prison be irresistibly alluring, and what does this allure imply for the purposes of punishment? How does the character of the one-time criminal differ from that of the career offender? How does stealing gratify both the wish to be dependent and the wish to be “macho” and aggressive? Why are metaphors of soft, wet dirt (such as slime and scum) commonly used for criminals, and why is this usage not really as negative as it seems? Why might the world be a poorer place without criminals?  These are some of the intriguing questions that will be explored in this class.  In addition, the course provides a basic understanding of psychoanalysis, including infantile sexuality, the unconscious, and the defense mechanisms, such as denial, repression, undoing, and splitting.  The class format will consist of lecture, discussion, movies, and (a few) games.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 747, 02A.

Law 747, 08A.

Legal Profession

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Elliott & Hughes Jr.

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: Study of the rules (primarily the ABA's Model Rules of Professional Conduct) and deeper principles that govern the legal profession, including the nature and content of the attorney-client relationship, conflicts of interest, appropriate advocacy, client identity in business contexts, ethics in negotiation, and issues of professionalism.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 622D, 000. Mental Health Issues in the Criminal Justice System

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Deets

Prerequisite: Criminal Law and Constitutional Law

Grading Criteria: Class Participation; Short papers; Group Project; Final Paper

Description: See below.

Appropriateness or need for the course:

The proposed workshop offers a substantive knowledge and practical skills professional development opportunity that is immediately meaningful to students planning to assume entry-level positions in the public criminal justice system as prosecutors or defense attorneys upon graduating from law school.  Current estimates indicate that mental illness among those incarcerated is steadily increasing.  These estimates suggest that 45% of federal offenders, 56% state offenders, and 64% jail inmates suffer from some form of mental illness.  Despite the prevalence of the intersection between mental illness and the criminal justice system, there is little to no educational opportunity to study the phenomena in the law school’s current curriculum.

Curricular fit or overlap with other courses:

The proposed workshop is unique from any current course offering expanding on the foundational Criminal Law course; however, it fits within the law school’s existing recognition of the need to support specialized criminal justice curriculum offerings, such as in the offerings covering juvenile law and white-collar crimes.  The Access to Justice Workshop which I developed a few years back and is now taught by an Emory alum, examines the critical importance of legal representation for the poor in the early stages of criminal prosecution.  The new proposed workshop will supplement these subspecialty areas within the study of the criminal justice system in a distinguishable, but equally important way.

Sequencing of this course with others:

The proposed workshop may be grouped with the development of essential substantive criminal law specialty offerings, such as juvenile law, access to justice for the indigent, and white collar crimes, however, it is not particularly subject to being sequenced, except perhaps as being considered as a factor in a student’s externship placement within a public defender’s office during their third year.

Pre-requisites and co-requisites:

Criminal Law and Constitutional Law

Target students:

Target students are third-year students interested in public criminal law, nonprofit public policy advocacy, and generally students interested in public interest and the civil rights of marginalized individuals. 

Anticipated student enrollment numbers:

The enrollment goal for the proposed course is 16 to 24 students.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 661 000, Natural Resources Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor: TBD

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: 4 short papers will be assigned throughout the class and grade will be based on those assignments; no exam

Description: Natural resource management presents extremely difficult and contentious issues of law and public policy.  This courses will encourage discussion on these issues, while providing an overview of relevant programs and laws that govern the use and protection of natural resource systems.  Special attention will be given to wetlands and coastal regulation, transportation and water resource development, energy, and pollution control. 

3 Sections:

Law 656, 06A.

Law 656, 06B(2).

Negotiations

THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION OR BUSINESS SCHOOL NEGOTIATIONS.

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Athans; Lytle; & Eldridge

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class preparation/participation and written assignment – No Exam

Description: This hands-on skills course will explore the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating settlements in both a litigation and a transactional context. The objectives of the course will be to develop proficiency in a variety of negotiation techniques as well as a substantive knowledge of the theory and practice, or the art and science of negotiations. Each week during class, students will negotiate fictitious clients' positions, sometimes preceded by a lecture and followed by critique and comparison of results with other students. Each problem will be designed to illustrate particular negotiation strategies as well as highlight selected professional and ethical issues. Preparation for class will include development of a negotiation strategy, reflective written memoranda required.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 754, 10A. Patent Law

Credits: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Holbrook

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Final Exam.

DescriptionThis course will cover the core topics of U.S. patent law such as patentability, including novelty, non-obviousness, and enablement; infringement; and remedies. The course will examine how patents are used as a business tool to commercialize new technologies and innovations. The course will also review the major aspects of patent reform as codified under the America Invents Act.  The course is designed to provide a solid background for on-patent specialists and for those planning a career in the field.  No technical background is required.  There is no prerequisite for this course.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

755, 06A. Pretrial Litigation

Credits: 4 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Geary; Lott; & McCoyd

Prerequisite: Third Years (Second Years with documented litigation or evidence course experience)

Grading Criteria: Written work and Oral performance

Description: This is a civil case litigation skills/simulation course. The students work as two person teams forming a law firm under the direct supervision of a "senior partner". ("Senior Partners" are adjunct professors who are local premiere attorneys in active practice or judges currently on the trial/appellate bench.) The student’s, aided and guided by their senior partner, represent their clients essentially as they would in actual cases, and learn the basics of preparing a case from investigation and initiation through discovery, making a record to support or defend a substantive motion-- the culminating exercise for the course. An actual client, played by a person from outside of the course, is assigned to each firm. The student lawyers conduct intake interviews of their clients and witnesses then proceed to represent them. At all stages of the process, students receive active input from and evaluation by the distinguished slate of adjunct professors. The students determine what type of legal action to take, and will draft pleadings, conduct informal witness interviews, draft written discovery and take and defend depositions.

Course faculty members provide guidance and instruction in their roles as teachers, judges and senior partners, with students taking primary responsibility for client representation and strategic decisions with regard to case direction. Actors who are very familiar with their parts and who remain "in character" appear in some roles as parties and witnesses while students in the course serve alternately as counsel and witness in others. The cases culminate in major motion hearings. The faculty members present regular lectures and demonstrations about various aspects of pretrial practice which are presented hand-in-hand with the developing procedures and technology affecting the practice of law. Attendance is required for the lectures, but primarily the student teams work independently. Every student performance, written and oral, is observed, critiqued and graded by the faculty. There are no written examinations. There are submissions of written materials and use of technology through audio visual presentations at motions hearings, etc. Students are graded on their class performances, written work product and development as "practicing attorneys." Former students have described this course as a great source for practical experience with regard to client relations, litigation strategy and discovery tactics -- all guided by esteemed faculty from the bench and practicing bar. Many students use their course case materials, experiences and notes as a practice resource after they enter the practice of law. The course provides students an interesting and exciting window on the actual practice of law.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 616, 12A. Real Estate Finance

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Alexander

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Description: This course first examines in detail the elements of basic real estate conveyances including the sales contract, instruments of conveyance and title assurance (recording acts, title insurance, warranties). The second half of the course is devoted to alternative methods of financing a real estate acquisition including various mortgage instruments, transfers of mortgaged property, and foreclosure questions.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 891. Special Topics in Technology I

OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Morris

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: This course will cover special topics in technology.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 719. Trademark Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Bagley, Margo

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

DescriptionThis course examines the law governing trademarks and other means of identifying products and services in the minds of consumers. Instruction primarily will focus on the federal statute governing trademarks and unfair competition, the Lanham Trademark Act of 1946, but students will learn about state laws and state law doctrines in the field as well. Topics include the protectibility of marks, including words, symbols, and “trade dress”; federal registration of marks; causes of action for infringement, dilution, and “cybersquatting”; and defenses, including parodies protected by the First Amendment.

*Updated as of Fall 2014.

Law 724. Transitional Justice

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s):Prof. Blank

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: 2 assignments (20% each of final grade) & Final exam (take home) (60% of final grade)

Description: This course explores the legal issues and real-life challenges in countries emerging from dictatorship, repression and armed conflict.  Students will examine key transitional justice principles and debates, the workings of multiple transitional justice mechanisms, and the dilemmas arising in societies transitioning from conflict and repression.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 724A. Transitional Justice Practicum

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ludsin

Prerequisite: Transitional Justice Course (co-req ok)

Enrollment: Limited to 4 students only! (must be Transitional Justice Course)

Grading Criteria: Short written projects/Large research report (75%) & small assignments (25%)

Description: This course is designed to be an add-on practicum to Prof. Laurie Blank's Transitional Justice course. It will offer students the opportunity to apply the knowledge they will receive from their doctrinal course to real world situations that human rights NGOs and think tanks are trying to address. The practicum not only will enhance students' understanding of the transitional justice issues but offers them the opportunity to build their essential research and writing skills. The practicum also will allow students the chance to network with organizations working on the cutting edge of this field. The course format includes a mix of lectures focused on building necessary skills, meetings to collaborate on and workshop projects and individual research time with the professor focused on their particular research project.

The course will be two credits and will require either several short written projects or one larger research report for an organization (75%), along with a serious of project-related small assignments to show the student's progress (25%). It will be limited to 4 students enrolled in the Transitional Justice course.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 674. Trusts and Estates

Credits: 4 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Pennell

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Midterm & Final Exam

Description: Study of the law of intestate succession, limitations on testamentary powers, formalities necessary for executing or revoking wills and trusts, incorporation by reference and the doctrine of independent legal significance, problems of construction and interpretation of wills, trusts, and will substitutes, plus limited study of the use of future interests in trust and powers of appointment. 

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 697C, 000. Turner Environmental Law Clinic

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Goldstein

Prerequisite: Environmental Advocacy (prerequisite OR co-requisite)

Grading Criteria: Group assignments (based on individual work)

Description: The Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides important pro bono legal representation to individuals, community groups, and nonprofit organizations that seek to protect and restore the natural environment for the benefit of the public. Through its work, the clinic offers students an intense, hands-on introduction to environmental law and trains the next generation of environmental attorneys.

Each year, the Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides over 4,000 hours of pro bono legal representation. The key matters occupying our current docket fighting for clean and sustainable energy; promoting sustainable agriculture and urban farming; and protecting our water, natural resources, and coastal communities are among the most critical issues for our state, region, and nation. The Clinic's students benefit and learn from immersion in these real world, complex environmental representations.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 685A. Veterans Benefits Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Early

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class Participation (10%) & Final Exam (90%)

DescriptionThis course introduces students to the body of administrative rules that govern the administration of veterans’ benefits, both through the Department of Veterans Affairs and the relevant courts. It teaches the law and procedure applicable to claims by veterans and their families at all stages of the Veterans Affairs (VA) adjudication process: initial fact-finding by VA regional offices, appellate claims to the Board of Veterans Appeals, and appellate review by the United States Court of Veterans Claims. In addition to instruction in relevant doctrine and policy exposure, students will engage in exercises directed to the basics of the disability rating process, to establishing the service connection to a disability, and to discharge review. Students will also be exposed to typical claims issues raised in veterans’ cases handled by the Emory Law Volunteer Clinic for Veterans. Law students interested in administrative law, personal injury, and civil litigation will benefit from this course, as will students interested in public service, who will be better prepared to serve as pro bono counsel to veterans in the future. This field will be one of growing importance, as the war in Afghanistan winds down and the military continues to shrink.

Textbook: Veterans Law Cases and Theory by Prof James Ridgway of GMU  (who is also the senior staff attorney at VA’s Board of Veterans Appeals).  

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 842, 000. SEM: Advance International Negotiations

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Balian & Zwier

Prerequisite: None (Negotiations or ADR recommended co-req)

Grading Criteria: Simulations; Class participation; & Paper

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Description: After a review of strategies and styles in two-party disputes, this seminar will look at complex multiparty international negotiations, including but not limited to: selected issues in Middle East Peace, including the territorial dispute over the Golan Heights and the Right of Return for refugees in the Palestinian context; the border dispute between Bolivia, Chile, and Peru; Sudan and the Comprehensive Peace Agreement; the Dayton Peace Accords for Bosnia and Herzegovina; Kosovo final status negotiations; and post-conflict rule of law building in Liberia. Our text will be Talking With Evil: Principled Pragmatism on an International Stage, by Paul J. Zwier: which deal with research on the wide array of potential approaches to international conflict resolution.  You can pick up a copy of this book at the copy center.  The cost will be $30.00.  Reading material is also selected from institutions involved in conflict resolution negotiations, including the Geneva-based Center for Humanitarian Dialogue and the Stockholm-based International IDEA. These materials, along with simulations that we will be using will be provided electronically.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Seminar: 840, 000. Children's Rights

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Woodhouse

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class Participation; Presentation; & Final Paper

Description: The goal of this seminar is to engage students in in-depth analysis, research and writing about the rights of children and youth. Children's Rights encompasses a broad range of issues, including constitutional and developmental frameworks, international human rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, economic and social rights of children, rights of minors accused of crimes, free speech, religious and reproductive rights of minors, including LGBTQ minors and minors with disabilities, rights of identity for immigrant children, adopted children and children conceived through alternative reproductive technologies, rights of children in out of home care, children's educational and disability rights, rights of children during conflict and wartime, children as refugees and workers, children as victims of domestic violence, trauma and abuse, and children's rights to agency and participation as members of the social and political community. In each of these areas, consideration of class, race and gender are ever present.

While we will utilize black letter law and court cases in our discussions and research, the contributions of disciplines other than law are critical to our understanding of children's rights (e.g., child development, psychology, social work, pediatrics, neurology, ethnography, economics). In addition, valuable work is being done by various organizations and NGOs active in advocating for children, furthering child-centered research and developing successful strategies or programs, at local, state, national and international levels. These resources will play a large role in your study of children's rights.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 809, Section 04A. SEM: Comparative Constitutional Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. An-na'im

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper & Class Participation

Description: The first part of this seminar will discuss concepts and mechanisms of constitutionalism, including comparative governance systems and models of normative and legal ordering of societies. The second part of the Seminar will focus on issues of law and religion in comparative perspectives. Issues to be covered include the relationship of religion, state, politics and law in a range of constitutional models, freedom of religion and belief and its relationship to other fundamental human rights, and competing models of the public role of religion.

Final grade will be basedon:

10% for class participation

30% for one paper on a topic to be specified in the Seminar Outline,

60% for a final paper on a topic agreed with instructor

Students who wish to use this Seminar for satisfying their writing requirement will submit a single final paper on a topic agreed with the instructor.

Students taking this option must submit:

-Substantial (app. 20 page) draft by Monday 31st October 2016, 

-Final version of their paper by Wednesday 30th November 2016.

The final papers must satisfy the length and format specifications of writing requirement papers, as set by the Registrar of Emory Law School.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Law 821: SEM: Corporate Governance

Credits: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Georgiev, George 

Prerequisite: Business Associations or equivalent

Grading CriteriaResearch paper; Presentation; & Class participation.

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Description: Corporate governance is in a state of tremendous flux as a result of the global financial crisis of 2008-09, the corporate accounting scandals of the early 2000s, heightened public scrutiny of corporate conduct, and the rise of shareholder activism. This seminar will provide an overview of the main academic theories of corporate governance and examine some of the ongoing debates about the efficacy and adequacy of recent reforms, such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, and related SEC rulemaking. Topics include: the structure and composition of the board of directors, executive compensation, shareholder activism, the role of proxy advisory firms, the financial crisis, corporate social responsibility, and the nexus between SEC disclosure obligations and corporate governance practices. 

Prof. Georgiev is joining Emory from UCLA School of Law. The seminar will require class participation, occasional short response papers on the reading assignments, a research paper, and a class presentation. The seminar will satisfy the writing requirement for JD students.

*Updated as of 3/24/2016. 

Law 825. SEM: Equality at Emory

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Dudziak

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Grading Criteria: Class Participation & Final Research Paper

Description: This seminar will explore the civil rights history of Emory Law School and Emory University. Readings will cover the history of inclusion and exclusion in higher education on the basis of race, gender, religion, disability, immigration status, and LGBTQ identity. Students will do historical research, using local archives and interviews, and will write research papers that illuminate an aspect of law school or university civil rights history. Although students will have different topics, the class will work together as a research team, sharing insights and research strategies.

Professor Dudziak is an expert in the history of civil rights, foreign relations and constitutional law. Her books include Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy. Before moving to Emory in 2012, she regularly taught course in civil rights history and individual constitutional rights.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

SEM: 823, 001. The Family, the State & Vulnerability

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Dinner

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Weekly reading; Class Participation; Short critical response papers; Oral presentation; & 30-page research paper.

Description: “Public” family law—welfare state policies and agencies—as well as “private” family law—marriage and divorce adjudication—regulate families. Public and private family law reinforce normative conceptions of the ideal family, privileging some “real” families and disadvantage others. Social insurance mechanisms such as survivors’ pensions; welfare entitlements such as Temporary Assistance to Needy Families; tax laws; and private family law mechanisms such as child support all shape family forms. Recent years have seen both change and continuity in legal regulation. Today, same-sex marriage has bestowed rights and obligations upon many gay families. Other families, however, negotiate human dependency and responsibility largely outside the bounds of formal legal recognition. 

This seminar uses history and theory to examine the changing legal regulation of the family via both public and private family law. The seminar takes as a starting point for analysis the concept of universal human vulnerability. The family serves both as a site of human beings’ experience of vulnerability and as a societal mechanism for responding to individuals’ vulnerability. As the nature of American capitalism evolved over the course of the twentieth century, families and the state adapted to the ways in which a dynamic economy affected the vulnerability and resilience of families. We will evaluate the efficacy of various legal responses. The seminar will require weekly reading, active participation, short critical response papers to the reading, an oral presentation to the class, and a thirty-page research paper. The seminar will satisfy the writing requirement for graduation.

*Updated as of 3/22/2016.

Law 810. SEM: Hate Speech & Free Speech

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Seaman

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: Regulation of hate speech and other expression that implicates equality values often comes into conflict with the First Amendment.  Recent events on university campuses, including at Emory, demonstrate the complexities that arise when listeners claim that others’ expression impacts their feelings of safety and inclusion.  This seminar broadly considers the intersection between these two fundamental constitutional values of freedom of expression and antidiscrimination.  Students will examine these issues from a variety of perspectives, including legal, comparative and interdisciplinary materials.  The basic constitutional law course is a prerequisite; prior coursework on freedom of speech is helpful but not strictly required. 

Law 819, 000. SEM Human Rights: Law, Medicine, & Human Rights

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Perry & Prof. Joel Zivot of Emory's School of Medicine

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description:This seminar will address several difficult, controversial topics, each of which (a) lies at the interface of law and medical science and (b) implicates one or more recognized human rights. The topics to be addressed include torture, capital punishment, and physician-assisted suicide. Every member of the seminar will be asked to write a paper, and the grade for the seminar will be based mainly on the paper. The seminar will be co-taught by Professor Joel Zivot of Emory's School of Medicine and Professor Michael Perry of Emory's School of Law.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 817, 000. SEM: Implementation of International Law in the US.

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Van der Vyver

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: An overview of American foreign policy, highlighting among other things what has come to be known as American exceptionalism and contrasting that with the post-World-War I American policy of isolationism, the promotion of American interests in international law, and a shift in American foreign policy brought about by the Obama administration; The prosecution of offences against the law of nations in the United States, with special emphasis on Article VI, Clause [2], and Article 1, Section (8), Clause [10], of the Constitution, and with special reference to the prosecution of torture and genocide in the United States; Non-ratification by the United States of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, with special emphasis on the influence of religious groups that oppose the ratification on biblical grounds, and the role of federalism (the rights of the child are almost exclusively within the jurisdiction of states) that may preclude the federal authorities from ratifying the Convention; The United States and the jurisprudence of international tribunals, with special emphasis on reluctance of the United States to submit itself to the jurisdiction of such tribunals, the Nicaragua Case in which the International Court of Justice in the 1980s condemned the United States for its assistance to the Contras, and the fairly recent judgment of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Medelln v. Texas, as well as decisions of the American Commission on Human Rights relating to non-compliance by the United States with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (by not always informing an alien detainee of his or her right to consular assistance); The International Criminal Court (ICC), with special emphasis on the positive role played by the United States in the drafting of the ICC Statute, hostility of the Bush administration toward the ICC, and re-engagement by the Obama administration with the ICC in 2009 to become a cooperating non-party State; and how this is to be reconciled with the American Servicemembers Protection Act, which in essence prohibits the United States from cooperating in any way with the ICC.

Military Interventions by the United States, with special reference to provisions in the U.N. Charter that instruct Member States not to settle their international disputed through the taking up of arms, questions as to legality under the norms of international humanitarian law of anticipatory self-defense, humanitarian interventions, and wars of liberation, the Reagan Doctrine, and the recent armed interventions in Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 843, 000. SEM: International Environmental Law

Credits: 3 hours 

Instructor(s): Prof. Fineman

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper 

Description: This seminar will examine the development of international environmental law (IEL), focusing on the major areas of global environmental protection including climate change and biodiversity. The course will trace the stages in the evolution of IEL and explore the development of the theoretical underpinnings of the regime, including sustainable development, the “polluter pays” principle, precaution and vulnerability among others. The aim of the course is to understand the current trajectory of the development of international environmental law and discuss possible frontier approaches that can advance global cooperation for conserving and protecting Earth’s environment.

Overarching themes that will recur in the seminar include ecological limitations versus economic development; North-South politics; international regulation versus State sovereignty; and maintaining the status quo versus the need for reform and the implementation of solutions.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 844, 000. SEM: Judicial Behavior

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. J. Shepherd

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Response papers & Final Paper

Description: How do judges decide cases? Some argue that judges primarily rely on legal factors to make their decisions, while others contend that judges decide cases in order to advance their own policy preferences.  More recent studies of judicial behavior have concluded that judges may also be influenced by an aversion to reversal, an attempt to reduce their workload, and efforts to stay on the bench or attain an promotion.  An understanding of judicial behavior is critical in policy debates about judicial selection methods, recusal rules, campaign finance reform, removal standards, and many other procedural rules and institutional norms. It is also an important factor in predicting litigation outcomes.  In this class, we will explore theories of judicial behavior, examine the empirical evidence about how judges decide cases, and discuss the policy implications arising from the evidence.  While some experience with empirical analysis would be helpful, it is not required.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016

Seminar: 833. Law and Vulnerability

Credits: 3 Hours 

Instructor(s): Profs. Fineman & Samandari

Grading Criteria: Paper

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisites: None

Enrollment: Limited to 16!

Description: This seminar explores the relationship between law and vulnerability from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The course is anchored in the understanding that fundamental to our shared humanity is our shared vulnerability, which is universal and constant and inherent in the human condition.  It will offer students an opportunity to engage with multiple perspectives on vulnerability, with an emphasis on law, justice, state policy and legislative ethics. While vulnerability can never be eliminated, society through its institutions confers certain "assets" or resources, such as wealth, health, education, family relationships, and marketable skills on individuals and groups.  These assets give individuals "resilience" in the face of their vulnerability. This seminar will explore how as society now is structured, however, certain individuals and groups operate from positions of entrenched advantage or privilege, while others are disadvantaged in ways that seem to be invisible as we engage in law and policy discussions.

*Updated as of 3/18/2016.

Law 838, 000. SEM: Products Liability

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Vandall

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: Products Liability (recommended)

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This seminar provides an opportunity for a student to write a paper on a developing aspect of products liability theory. Topics considered and materials will vary from year to year. The course in Products Liability is recommended, but not required.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

Law 746A, 000. SEM: Professional Negligence

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Partlett

Selection: Pre-selection form: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/lsr-fall-2016-seminar-preselection/ 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: This seminar will explore the liability of professionals for negligent conduct. It will cover professionals such as physicians, psychologists, dentists, and others whose actions risk bodily injury. It will also cover those whose professional activities risk property and economic losses, such as engineers, architects, lawyers, and accountants. The legal field of focus is liability in the borderland between torts and contracts. The seminar will also engage the form and structure of business torts that are neglected in the curriculum, yet loom large in commercial practice.

Particularly with respect of medical malpractice, compensation schemes to replace or supplement liability rules continue to be proposed. Their merits and demerits will be discussed. The seminar will also consider such fundamental issues as causation and remedies, where the liability of professionals is in question.

Materials will be distributed and discussion expected. Students will be required to prepare a paper that can be in satisfaction of the upper-level writing requirement. Students will orally present a final draft paper in class. This will form part of the final grade. In selection of the topic and in working through drafts, students will work closely with me.

*Updated as of Fall 2015.

The following courses are being offered in Spring 2016.

Access to Justice Workshop: Getting Into the Courtroom

Class Number: 4933; Catalog Number- Law 679, 02A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Costa, Jason F.

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Classroom exercises, court performance, periodic reaction papers

Description: Access to Justice provides second and third year law students the unique opportunity to see how justice is actually administered in criminal cases in actual Georgia Courts and to develop their courtroom oral advocacy skills in a real-world setting. We will examine, through readings and classroom discussion, the ways in which poor and under-served populations access justice within the framework of the traditional criminal justice system, and the increasing role of accountability courts for defendants suffering with drug, alcohol or mental health afflictions

But this class extends far beyond the conventional classroom in three significant ways. First, students will take multiple off-campus trips, including touring the local jail facility and attending actual court sessions to observe criminal case proceedings. Second, students will receive real recent criminal case warrants and police reports and will conduct interviews with actual defendants (either in or out of custody) and participate in mock classroom hearings on these cases. Lastly, where possible, students will represent their clients in actual court proceedings (bond hearings, preliminary hearings, and even possibly motions and trials).

Students should plan to be in court one weekday morning every other week throughout the semester, though multiple days will be available each week to accommodate individual student schedules. Students will be graded primarily on their performance in both classroom and courtroom hearings and their participation in classroom discussion, and secondarily on periodic papers analyzing their experiences.

Please note: any students who have previously or are currently interning or doing a field placement with the State Court Division of the Law Office of the DeKalb County Public Defender will be ineligible for this course.  Additionally, this course cannot be taken concurrently with an internship or field placement in the DeKalb County Solicitors or District Attorney’s Office as it would cause a professional conflict.

Administrative Law

Class Number: 4805; Catalog Number- Law 701, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Arthur, Thomas

Prerequisite: Legislation & Regulation. 

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: Most areas of contemporary legal practice require lawyers to work with administrative agencies and a large body of law concerning such agencies. This course is a study of how agencies are empowered, the procedures and modes through which agencies carry out their tasks, and legal constraints on these agencies. Topics include constitutional limits on Congress' power to delegate legislative and judicial power to agencies; procedures imposed upon agency adjudication and lawmaking by the Constitution, the Administrative Procedure Act, and other statutes; the scope of judicial review of agency decisions, including the methods by which courts restrict and control agency discretion, and the limitations on the availability of federal judicial review of federal agency actions. In addition, the course will explore several recent "regulatory reform" initiatives.

Advanced Criminal Trial Advocacy: Criminal Litigation 

Class Number: 4934; Catalog Number- Law 852 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Rubin & Prof. Brickman 

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Motion/Brief; and Mock Trial. 

Description: The course is designed to teach trial techniques, criminal procedure and ethics. Most of the classes will involve the students conducting various types of hearings and arguments. Designed in a case-simulation format, the course will enable the students to develop substantive knowledge of criminal law and procedures, develop case theory and witness testimony, draft pretrial motions, and finally conduct a full jury trial. The course will also build on the skills learned in Trial Techniques and develop students' facility with the advocacy techniques necessary to prosecute or defend criminal cases. Students will have multiple opportunities to perform in class and will receive extensive individual feedback from experienced lawyers. Further, several classes will involve discussions with guest speakers on ethics, investigation and forensics.

Students will be graded on their performance in class during the semester, on a written brief, and on their performance in the mock trial at the end of the semester. Grades will be based on how well the students conduct the hearings and trials, i.e., formulation of examination questions, understanding of theory of examination, ability to frame legal arguments and make objections, and presentation. Students will also be required to draft a motion and brief, and will be graded on the quality of the legal writing.

Advanced Issues in White Collar Crime

Class Number: 5018; Catalog Number- Law 875

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Maloy, Bruce

Prerequisites: Criminal Law

Grading Criteria:  

Description: In the 21st century, white collar criminal cases – including business frauds, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations, tax evasion, healthcare fraud, and criminal violations of the securities statutes – have become increasingly complex, forcing lawyers to confront issues like the waiver of a corporation’s attorney-client privilege, joint defense agreements, defense witness immunity, and parallel investigations by enforcement agencies and global settlements. White collar criminal lawyers also need to know how to deal with internal investigations, whistle blowers, wiretaps and search warrants. This class aims to introduce students to the governing law and practice in this field, with a particular focus on how to defend clients accused of white collar crimes in the US and in multinational investigations.

Advanced Legal Research

Class Number: 4807; Catalog Number- Law 657, 12A

Accelerated Class: January 4, 2016 – February 15, 2016

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Christian, Elizabeth

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Enrollment: 20

DescriptionAn examination of the legal research methods and sources beyond the basics taught during the first year of law school. Through lectures and practical application with in-class exercises and a final research project, students will become familiar with topics such as advanced research techniques, case, statute & regulatory research, aids for the practitioner and legislative history research.

This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the first seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

Advanced Legal Writing: Blogging and Social Media

Class Number: 4935; Catalog Number- Law 851, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Romig & Prof. Chapman

Prerequisite: LWRAP I

Grading Criteria: Students will write approximately eight blog posts of 600-800 words each, and will comment on other students’ work posted on the course blog. Satisfactory peer review of selected assignments and the final project will also be required. This work is ungraded but required for passing the course, and will form the basis for the final capstone blog project.

The final grade will be calculated as follows: 10 percent of the grade will be based on a short small-group presentation on an assigned topic about blogging (examples: strong lead paragraphs, use of headings, humor, links and citations).

The other 90 percent will be based on the capstone blog project, in which students will create blogs representing themselves and their law-related interests. Each student will create his or her own blog that includes at least five posts revised from the student’s earlier posts in the course, and two additional posts that the student creates. These posts should represent the student’s legal research and analytical abilities, reader-focused organization and reader-friendly concise writing, unique yet still professional voice, and writing proficiency with grammar and punctuation. The goal is to create a blog that the student can use after the class to explore his or her law-related interests and represent those interests to potential employers. The student will have the ability to limit blog access to class members only. Prior technical knowledge of blogging software is not required – students will learn to use WordPress, a leading blogging platform.

Description: This course is an experiential course that will teach skills that are crucial for every young litigator or any lawyer who might end up in court. We will discuss many of the typical pre-trial motions filed when defending a civil case and will address litigation strategy. Specifically, the class will work through a medical malpractice case, and the students will write three briefs: (1) a brief in support of a motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim; (2) a brief in response to a motion to compel discovery; and (3) a brief in support of a motion for summary judgment. We anticipate the students will also do an oral argument on the motion for summary judgment. The assignments will be “closed universe” assignments, meaning that the students will not need to do independent research. Out of class reading, other than authorities for the briefs, will be limited; the students will learn to write briefs by writing them. The students will not take a separate final exam. The only prerequisites for this course are those in the first year curriculum. Students do not need to take Pre-Trial Litigation before taking this class.

Advanced Pretrial Litigation

Class Number: 4825; Catalog Number- Law 755A, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elmore & Prof. Goheen

Prerequisite: Federal Courts; Civil Procedure

Description: Advanced Pre-Trial Litigation is for students who have taken Civil Procedure, and Federal Courts, and are ready for an advanced strategy practicum that prepares them for the complexities of modern litigation practice. 

The Legal Strategy part of the course teaches students to consider the theoretical aspects of strategy and methods for working through a strategy problem, and then apply those theories and methods to practical problems.  The problems involve a small business that encounters a series of situations requiring advice with respect to strategy. 

In the second part of the course, the students will learn about negotiation theory and strategy and apply these techniques to the negotiation of an e-discovery dispute.  Discovery of electronic materials, usually in digital format, creates some especially difficult, time-sensitive responsibilities for lawyers.  Practicing successful methods for dealing with these responsibilities in a learning-by-doing setting provides an opportunity to adapt these methods to the individual lawyer’s own situation and style.

This is “entry-level” subject matter in the sense that it does not purport to cover all the specialized aspects of e-discovery, particularly those faced by very large companies or by companies with unusual records retention practices.  The purpose of this part of the course is to provide lawyers with a general methodology that will, in most cases, prevent sanctions against the client and the lawyer, while being responsive under the rules to e-discovery requests and minimizing unnecessary business interruption.  However, no general method can protect against every mistake or every type of intentional wrongdoing.  And no general method can minimize business interruptions in every situation. 

This course is structured around the requirements of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence.  States may have more or less restrictive requirements, but the federal rules provide a useful general benchmark, and many state jurisdictions follow them.  

E-discovery problems arise in two distinct phases:

  • Preservation, production, and use of e-discovery; and
  • Prosecuting or defending against challenges to the sufficiency of e-discovery.

These are quite different areas and require different skills.  For this reason, we have developed two separate sections on e-discovery.  The first part focuses on preservation, production, and use of e-discovery and seeks to develop the skills for interviewing, negotiating, and organizing your electronic discovery.  A second part focuses on challenges to the sufficiency of e-discovery and seeks to develop the skills for preparing, arguing, and defending against typical motions for protective orders, motions to compel and motions for sanctions. 

The e-discovery problems also develop skills in counseling clients, negotiating with opposing lawyers, and dealing successfully with vendors.  These skills are directed at the first-in-time problems of e-discovery – getting it right at the start and preventing disputes or adverse decisions.  The course adapts established learning-by-doing teaching materials on interviewing and counseling, and on negotiation, for the special e-discovery setting.  The case law applies primarily to the second area of e-discovery:  prosecuting and defending against challenges to the sufficiency of e-discovery.

Finally, in part three of the course we will deal with the strategy and law of class action law suits.  This part of the course will teach you how to make the decision whether to file a class action law suit, or go it alone.  It will also examine how to think about your defense options: whether to agree to a class action for settlement purposes, fight class certification, or negotiate some variation between these two extremes,(including an overview of multidistrict litigation options).  This part of the course will also refine your understanding the law and procedure (including appellate review) related to class certifications.

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Class Number: 4808; Catalog Number- Law 605, 04A (Allgood) 

Class Number: 4872; Catalog Number- Law 605, 02A (Armstrong)

Class Number: 4960; Catalog Number- Law 605, GRAD (Allgood) 

COURSES NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN BUSINESS SCHOOL OR LAW SCHOOL NEGOTIATIONS. 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Allgood & Prof. Armstrong

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria:

  • Team Role Plays and Final Objective Exam (Allgood)
  • Take Home (Armstrong)

Enrollment: 20

Description: This course will explore Alternative Dispute Resolution [ADR] with an emphasis on negotiation, mediation and arbitration processes. Course objectives include an overview of these processes as a complement to litigation as well as study of and training in the skill sets used in each of the ADR processes by advocates as well as neutrals.

American Legal History: Citizenship & Race Workshop 

Class Number: 6096; Catalog Number- Law 644

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Cleaver, Kathleen

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; In-class oral presentation; memo; and research paper. 

Description: This course examines the evolution of U.S. citizenship as interpreted by courts and statutes during the 19th and 20th centuries, with particular attention given to the impact of historical events that constructed the way race was conceived of within the United States.

During the workshop we will study and discuss the Civil War amendments to the U.S. Constitution, 19th century civil rights legislation, restrictions imposed on Asian immigration, the citizenship of native peoples, the incorporation of Mexican territory and the citizenship of Mexicans, issues of equal protection, and the modern civil rights legislation of 1957 and 1964.

American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research

Class Number: 4905; Catalog Number- Law 560, LLM1

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Daspit, Nancy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: An introduction to law and sources of law, legal bibliography and research techniques and strategies, the analysis of problems in legal terms, the writing of an office memorandum of law.

American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research II

Class Number: 5383; Catalog Number- Law 560B, GRAD

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credit: 1 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Daspit, Nancy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

DescriptionThe objective of this course is to explore and develop American legal writing, analysis and research areas that are not covered by the introduction course.

Analysis, Research, and Communication (ARC)

Class Number: 5382; Catalog Number- Law 590, GRAD

Credit: 2 hours 

Instructors: Prof. Daspit & Prof. Glon

Prerequisite: None

Grading CriteriaRegular Assignments / Final Project

DescriptionThis course will provide an introduction to legal analysis, research and effective legal writing. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of legal analysis and the structure of legal information. Students will learn how to navigate multiple legal resources to discover legal authority appropriate for different types of legal analysis and communications. Students will learn the concepts of effective legal analysis and will develop the skills necessary to produce persuasive arguments as well as informative legal explanations.

Analytical Methods of Lawyers

Class Number: 4926; Catalog Number- Law 734, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, Joanna

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Enrollment: 80

Description: This course explores the application to the practice of law of analytical methods of the social sciences and business profession. It will introduce essential concepts from economics, accounting, finance, statistics, and game theory to prepare students for legal practice in the modern world. These tools can be tremendously important and useful; not knowing something about them can be a serious detriment to the effective practice of law. Always, our focus will be on the application of analytical methods to real legal problems, such as the appropriate measure of damages or when to settle a case -- not becoming adept at complicated calculations. Our primary goal: to recognize when an analytical method would be useful in a legal situation and to develop a rough idea of how to use that method. Students are not expected to have any prior training or experience.

Antitrust Law

Class Number: 4920; Catalog Number- Law 702, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Arthur, Thomas

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Federal regulation of competitive practices under the Sherman, Clayton, and Federal Trade Commission Acts. The course covers such antitrust problems as joint activities by direct competitors, including cartel price fixing, market division and boycott arrangements and productive joint ventures; monopolization by single firms; restraints imposed by manufacturers on their distributors; and mergers.

Art and Acts of Justice (Literature, Psychoanalysis, & Law) 

Class Number: 5376; Catalog Number- Law 621, CPLT *Cross-listed course 

Starts: January 11, 2016*

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Felman, Soshana

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Attendance; Class participation; Short papers; Reading responses; and Oral presentation.

Description:A study of scenes of judgment in literature, art and philosophy, focusing on literature’s specific ways of dealing with injustice (and with trauma) in various literary, psychoanalytic, political and legal circumstances.  We will examine both (great) literary texts and actual trials, dramas of great literary writers brought to court because of their innovative work, perceived as having pushed the boundaries of the accepted social  standards. We will try to understand: What does literature mean, and why is it important, why does it matter?  Why does a path-breaking work of art provoke each time not just a controversy but a larger cultural crisis? Topics under discussion include the interaction between justice, truth, desire, censorship, testimony, injury, memory, exile, and cross-cultural, global exchanges.

*Starts a week later so it can coincide with the start of Laney Graduate School. 

Asset Forfeiture and the Bank Secrecy Act

Class Number: 5294; Catalog Number- Law 603

Credit:  2 Hours

Instructor:  Prof. Krepp, Thomas

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class participation and take home examination

Enrollment: 14 students

Description: This class will explore asset forfeiture, the process by which federal law enforcement seizes and forfeits property linked to criminal activity.  This is a unique area of the law that touches upon various aspects of criminal law, civil law, regulatory compliance, and financial laws.  The class delves into the policy, legal, and ethical issues surrounding the federal forfeiture statutes.  The class will also explore the Bank Secrecy Act, which is closely linked to asset forfeiture, and requires financial institutions to detect and report criminal activity.  The course should be of interest to students interested in federal criminal and civil practice as well as those students interested in regulatory compliance and the representation of financial institutions. 

Bankruptcy Law Research

Class Number: 5298; Catalog Number- Law 657E

ACCELERATED COURSE: Starts week of February 15, 2016-March 28, 2016. 

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor: Prof. Flick, Amy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Exercises and Research Project

Description: The course will introduce research methods and resources for bankruptcy law research. Students will become familiar with bankruptcy research through lectures and by practical application through in-class exercises, research homework exercises, and a final project researching a single large case. Topics will include research in the Bankruptcy Code and Rules, legislative history, bankruptcy case law resources, specialized bankruptcy treatises and databases, dockets, and reorganization plans. Tools used in bankruptcy practice will be introduced, including electronic case filing, docket tracking, and case management software.

Barton Appeal for Youth Clinic

Class Number: 4881; Catalog Number- 635D

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Reba, Stephen

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: None (based on individual student)

Description: Students in the Appeal for Youth Clinic provide holistic appellate representation of youthful offenders in the juvenile and criminal justice systems. By increasing the number of appeals from adjudications of delinquency, we hope to end the unwritten policies and practices that result in youths being committed to juvenile detention facilities. Similarly, by providing post-conviction representation to youths who were tried and convicted as adults, we hope to decrease the number of youthful offenders who languish in Georgia's prisons.

Barton Policy & Legislative Advocacy Clinic

Class Number: 4810; Catalog Number- Law 635C

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Carter, Melissa 

PrerequisiteStudents must have taken or be concurrently enrolled in the two-credit class, Child Welfare Law & Policy. This requirement may be waived for students with demonstrable prior experience in child advocacy, including the Emory Summer Child Advocacy Program.

Grading Criteria: None (based on individual student)

Description: The Barton Policy and Legislative Advocacy Clinic is an in-house legal clinic committed to evidence-based reforms to improve outcomes for children and families involved in the juvenile court, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems.  Students enrolled in the clinic conduct research and engage in advocacy to promote policies to advance the legal rights and interests of children.  Specifically, students will participate in the legislative session, complete research for publication, participate in local and statewide advocacy events, and help inform the discussion of juvenile law with their own ideas or projects.  Approximately 6-9 law and other graduate students are selected each semester to participate in the clinic.

Applications are accepted prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, list of 2 references, the name of his/her LWRAP Instructor, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

Detailed course information is on the Clinic web site, http://www.childwelfare.net »

Business and Strategic Lawyering

Class Number: 4897; Catalog Number- Law 630, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Aronson, Morton

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: This course focuses on client development and retention. Business and Strategic Lawyering is the big picture of law. It is the development and understanding of legal, business, political social and other considerations with a goal to implementing strategic legal, business and other actions to obtain the best results. The constantly changing fields of science, technology and globalization and their legal, business, political and social consequences make the strategic merging of proactive business strategies and legal considerations necessary for optimizing results. Both lawyers and business executives need to act proactively to protect clients and shareholder interests through effective strategic legal and business risk management structures and processes within the larger strategic business context. The course will include prominent guest lecturers from the legal and business communities.

This course will also consider and evaluate law firm management procedures and techniques to maximize on revenues as well as more effectively serving business clients. In the innovative driven technological economy we are living today, strategic lawyering has become an imperative for both lawyers and business executives.

Business Associations
  • Class Number: 4861; Catalog Number- Law 500, 08A (Freer): Credit 4 hours
  • Class Number: 4887; Catalog Number- Law 500X, 04A (Kang): Credit 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Freer & Prof. Kang

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

DescriptionThis course surveys formation, organization, financing, management, and dissolution of sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, limited partnerships, and limited liability companies. The course includes fundamental rights and responsibilities of owners, managers, and other stakeholders. The course also considers the special needs of closely held enterprises, basic issues in corporate finance, and the impact of federal and state laws and regulations governing the formation, management, financing, and dissolution of business enterprises. This course includes consideration of major federal securities laws governing insider trading and other fraudulent practices under Rule 10b-5 and section 16(b).

Advanced Immigration Law – Business, Employment and Investment Immigration

Class Number: 5019; Catalog Number- Law 876

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Kuck, Charles

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: 3-hour final exam (MC, Short Answer, Essay)

Description:Immigration law is one of the most divisive and complex areas in American law, and a source of major policy debate. This course will introduce students to substantive legal concepts and procedures underlying the practice of immigration law in the United States, with emphasis on employment and investment based immigration. The course aims to provide an understanding of immigration statutes, regulations and processes, analyzing administrative and judicial decisions and agency practices, as well as to placing our current immigration laws and system in their historical, social, and political contexts. A critical component of the course is the practical application of the immigration laws, concepts and procedures learned. The course includes review of admission issues, employment-eligibility verification compliance, employer sanctions, nonimmigrant and immigrant visa classifications and procedures (e.g., B, F, E, J, L, TN, H, O and P Visas, Labor Certification, I-140 Petitions, EB-5 Adjustment of Status, Consular Processing), advanced immigration concepts (e.g., H-1B Portability, Green Card Portability, Visa Retrogression), and practical solutions and strategies for handling immigration-related issues in the workplace.

Capital Defender Workshop

Class Number: 4809; Catalog Number- Law 658, 03A

SELECTION: INTERESTED STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT A LETTER OF INTEREST & RESUME TO JOSH MOORE, OFFICE OF THE GEORGIA CAPITAL DEFENDER (PHONE: 404.736.5151; FAX: 404.739.5155)

Credit: 3 Hours (pass/fail)

Instructor(s): Prof. Moore, Josh

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation

Description: This is a three hour clinical course taught in partnership with the Office of the Georgia Capital Defender, the new state agency responsible for representing all indigent defendants statewide in capital cases at trial and on direct appeal. Second and third year law students from Emory, Georgia State, UGA, and Mercer will assist Capital Defender attorneys in all aspects of preparing their clients’ cases for trial. Students will become involved in fact investigations, witness interviewing, legal research and drafting, and general preparations for trials and sentencing hearings. The great opportunity students have in this clinic—as opposed to clinics that focus on the appeal and post-conviction stages—is to be involved in the effort to save lives on the front end, on “making the case for life.” That means students will focus at least as much on mitigation, fact investigation, and interpersonal skills as on death penalty law and advocacy skills.

The course component of this clinic will meet for 2 hours each week at the offices of the Capital Defender in downtown Atlanta. In addition to attending class, students will work on client matters for 10 hours each week. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis only, and students who express willingness to commit for 2 semesters will be given preference at the Pre-selection stage. Please indicate on your application whether you have taken any criminal procedure course(s) or the capital punishment course.

Catalyzing Social Impacts *Cross-listed with BUS 336/BUS 535

Class Number: ; Course Number- Law 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Roberts, Peter (Goizueta Busincess School)

Prerequisite

Grading Criteria:  

Description: In this project-based course, students gain experience analyzing and then developing solutions to the complex challenges faced by organizations that aspire to have meaningful social impacts. While conducting structured research that addresses the real-world issues faced by our clients, students gain exposure to the many experiments and ideas that relate to their assigned projects. They then apply this new knowledge, along with the skills that they are developing in law school, and working with Goizueta MBA students, to generate solutions that address our clients’ issues. In this way, we are also able to make tangible contributions to the lives that are touched by our impact-oriented clients.

Open to 2Ls, 3Ls and LLMs by application/permission only.

https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/preselection-for-catalyzing-social-impact/ 

Child Welfare Law and Policy

Class Number: 4862; Catalog Number- Law 635, 02A

THIS COURSE QUALIFIES AS A PRE-REQUISITE OR CO-REQUISITE FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE BARTON PUBLIC POLICY OR LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY CLINIC.

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Carter, Melissa. 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Grading Criteria: Grading is based on participation and a combination of in-class exercises and written assignments designed to encourage critical thinking about child welfare policy and to develop specific advocacy skills.

Description: This course will explore the various factors that shape public policy and perception concerning abused and neglected children, including: the constitutional, statutory, and regulatory framework for child protection; varying disciplinary perspectives of professionals working on these issues; and the role and responsibilities of the courts, public agencies and non-governmental organizations in addressing the needs of children and families. Through a practice-focused study, students will examine the evolution of the child protection system, including the emergence of the juvenile court, and critical issues such as legal representation of children, impact litigation and limits on governmental authority. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of legal, legislative, and policy measures as a response to child abuse and neglect and to appreciate the roles of various disciplines in the collaborative field of child advocacy. Through lecture, discussion, analytical writing and skills-based exercises, including legislative drafting and oral advocacy assignments, students will develop a fuller understanding of this specialized area of the law and the companion skills necessary to be an effective advocate.

Civil Trial Practice: Family Law 

Class Number: 4866; Course Number- Law 958, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Wellon, Robert

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Course Work, Pretrial Conference and Trial 

Description: Designed to build on the litigation skills introduced in last year’s Trial Techniques Program, this course will enhance students’ trial proficiency by emphasizing lecture, demonstrations, as well as regular classroom participation through the NITA-inspired learn-by-doing approach. Students will receive guidance from a highly experienced panel of instructors comprised of well-respected judges and trial lawyers. Courtroom technology and visual aids will also be presented by providers of litigation support. The case file is built around a divorce trial, with issues of custody, alimony and support, division of property, and an interesting twist on adultery and its impact. There are no family law pre-requisites for this course, as the primary focus will be developing and refining trial skills which will translate into any litigation. Some emphasis will be placed on the substantive law of domestic relations to establish the issues to be tried, but the real goal of the course is to further enhance the development of true trial lawyers. Other components of the course will feature jury selection by a nationally known jury consultant, and pretrial conferences in anticipation of preparing for trial. Throughout the course, knowledge of evidence and its proper application will be emphasized, along with effective and practical techniques of delivery and examination. At the conclusion of the semester, a full trial will be conducted by student trial teams to a live jury in a real courtroom setting at the DeKalb County Courthouse with actual trial judges presiding. This is an essential course for students interested in honing and further enhancing their abilities in a courtroom, and for others simply interested in expanding their knowledge and skills in the burgeoning area of family law. The course has been expanded to three hours in recognition of the value of the course and the time and specialized attention required to prepare law students to move immediately into trial work upon graduation.

Colloquium Series Workshop: War and Security in Law, Culture, & Society

Class Number: 5020; Catalog Number- Law 770, 04A

Credit: 2-3 Hours (optional 3rd credit for law students who write research papers)

Selection: Pre-selection (up to 10 law students)

Instructor: Prof. Dudziak, Mary

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class Work & Research Paper.

Description: This course is a law and graduate seminar held in conjunction with the Colloquium on War and Security in Law, Culture and Society. The colloquium approaches the study of law and war, and of national security, as inherently interdisciplinary areas of inquiry.  Each year the colloquium will focus on a particular theme, and will feature new work by scholars across a range of fields. Outside speakers will present works in progress. During weeks when there is no guest presenter, students will read and discuss books and articles on war, national security, and the role of law.

Course requirements:  Students enrolled will be required to read and comment on papers by outside speakers, to read and discuss course readings, and to write a 20 page paper.  Law students who enroll for an additional credit (for a total of 3 credits) will write a research paper of at least 30 pages instead of a 20 page paper. The 30 page research paper will involve more extensive research, and students will be required to complete additional assignments (paper topic essay and first draft), and will likely have an opportunity to present their research to the seminar.

The colloquium theme for Spring 2016: Soldiers and Civilians.

We will read and discuss works related to the experience of soldiers and civilians with war in the 20th century and after, including the history of U.S. military service, the draft and the all-volunteer armed services; the way casualties – military and civilian – have affected war politics and policy; civilian casualties and the concept of “collateral damage;” veterans, including disabled veterans.

Commercial Law: Sales

Class Number: 5021; Catalog Number- Law 612

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Hay, Peter 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam or In-class Exam; Early delivery option for take-home. 

Description: The first-year Contracts course typically is too compressed to deal in any depth with Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) which, in some form, is now the law in all States and applies to contracts for the sale of goods in excess of $500. This course covers Article 2 in depth and adds some treatment of documentary transactions (bills of lading and letters of credit). The Convention on the International Sales of Goods (CISG) was ratified by the United States and, as federal law, therefore supersedes the UCC, whenever its provisions cover an issue. The course therefore supplements UCC study with all relevant provisions of the CISG. – The course is offered in the form of a workshop in which issues like contract formation, formalities, conditions, breach, remedies are studied in a problem-solving format: Code (or CISG) law is applied to solve hypothetical cases, with court decisions serving as authoritative tools for the interpretation of the statutory language. The study of Art. 2 is a very desirable completion of one’s understanding of Contract law.

Complex Litigation

Class Number: 4867; Catalog Number- Law 610, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Freer, Richard 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

DescriptionA study of the metamorphosis of litigation from the simple two-party model to multi-party, multi-claim litigation increasingly prevalent today, including the causes of this change and ability of the legal system to resolve such disputes. The course centers on a detailed study of the class action device, including jurisdictional and due process implications. Also included is the study of the problem of duplicative state and federal litigation, judicial control of complex cases, including multi-district litigation procedures and the case management movement, discovery (including international and e-discovery), and problems relating to preclusion in complex cases.

Conflict of Laws 

Class Number: 5022; Catalog Number- Law 709, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Hay, Peter

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: When a case has interstate or international aspects – for instance: place of contracting and performance differ, a tort has cross-border effects, one party seeks an ex parte divorce or maintenance or child custody modification in another state or country, or an intestate decedent leaves property in different places -, the first question that rises: which court or courts have jurisdiction?  Second, the court that does entertain the case must then decide which law to apply. (The anticipated answer to this question may influence the plaintiff’s choice of court in the first place). Third, if a successful plaintiff find no assets locally, s/he needs to get the judgment recognized and enforced in a state or country where the debtor defendant does have assets. – The course offers a good review of important aspects of civil procedure and treats choice of the applicable law and judgment recognition in depth. The focus is on interstate conflicts cases but the course also contains comparative and international material in all of its parts.

Copyright Law

Class Number: 4873; Catalog Number- Law 710, 02A 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Beck, Joseph 

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: Copyright law offers protection for original works including music, paintings, photographs, sculpture, movies, books, plays, fabric , architectural works, software and visual art. This course examines copyright law and its ability to respond to recent developments in technology. Course topics include the exclusive rights a copyright confers; infringement; defenses, including "fair use"; and remedies. There is also discussion of copyright litigation strategies and tactics employed by Professor Beck on behalf of his clients in the course of his private practice; in that sense, the class aims to be relatively pragmatic rather than theoretical.

Corporate Finance

Class Number: 5023; Catalog Number- Law 712, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, George

Prerequisites: Business Associations 

Grading Criteria

Description: A study of financial and economic theory underlying legal doctrines in corporate finance, and the relationship between these doctrines. Focuses on decisions about "value" in the context of such areas as bankruptcy reorganization, dissenters' appraisal rights, and public utility regulation. Problems of capital structure and the duties of directors to various classes of claimants are studied in light of decisions about dividend policy and reinvestment. Includes a brief review of modern portfolio theory. 

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I

Class Number: 4853; Catalog Number- Law 959, 10A

Class Number: 4871; Catalog Number- Law 959, 02A 

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor: Prof. Metzger, Jane

Prerequisite: Evidence & Trial Techniques;

Grading Criteria: Class work

Enrollment: Strictly limited to 12 students

Class open only to 3Ls

Description: This course introduces students to basic acting, directing and writing tools a lawyer needs to motivate and persuade jurors, and applies these tools to courtroom performance. Using lectures, exercises, readings, individual performance and video playback, the course helps students develop concentration, observation skills, storytelling, spontaneity, and physical and vocal technique. Students also gain practical experience applying these tools to the presentation of openings and closings as well as questioning witnesses and jurors.

Students reflected on what they gained from taking this class:

"I think what is most drastically different is how much more professional I came across later in the semester."

-Ben S.

"The largest benefit I drew from our class was the ability to stand comfortably in front of a group of people."

-Diana S.

"The most valuable aspect is practice, practice, practice, especially when combined with live and individualized feedback. I can make presentations with significantly less internal anxiety than before, and with more organization and the outward appearance of credibility." -Andrew R.

"This class taught me that putting work into your speaking style can really pay off! I also found the freedom during this class to try some experiments with my speaking technique, including not memorizing a script and moving about my space." -Alan W.

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication

Class Number: 4922; Catalog Number- Law 622B, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Levine

Prerequisite: Criminal Law

Grading Criteria: Modified open book, in-class final exam; 6-8 page paper; meritorious class participation.

Enrollment: 24

Description: This course will examine how lawyers and judges behave in the criminal courts throughout the United States, as well as the legal doctrines implicated by their behavior. Topics include discovery, pre-trial detention, jury selection, prosecutorial charging and bargaining, ineffective assistance of counsel, double jeopardy, and speedy trial issues. Readings address material from law, sociology, history, and public policy. Students should note that this class has a strong sociology focus; it is not predominantly doctrinal.

CRIMINAL TAX CONTROVERSIES

Class Number: 5521; Catalog Number- Law 641A

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Grimberg, Steven   

Co-requisite or Prerequisite:  None

Grading Criteria: Written assignments and classroom exercises

Enrollment: 14

Description: This class will provide practical skills training in criminal tax and tax-related controversies, including tax evasion, tax fraud, money laundering and identity theft.  The class will involve a mix of lecture and “learn by doing” exercises that will be geared towards developing your analytical, oral and written advocacy skills.  No prior course work in tax, evidence, or criminal procedure is required, but some basics in these areas will be covered.

Customs Law & Administration 

Class Number: 5024; Catalog Number- Law 688

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Pike, Damon

Prerequisites: None (Although Admin. Law would be helpful)

Grading Criteria: Participation; Take-home paper; and In-class Exam

Description: As the world’s largest economy, the United States imports and exports more merchandise than any other country. “Customs Law” covers the “nuts and bolts” of laws administered by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”), the agency charged with regulating imports into the U.S. and collecting duties (including antidumping and countervailing duties), import fees, and related taxes.

Custom laws and regulations center on the tariff classification of merchandise under the Harmonized System (as set forth in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the U.S.), the valuation of goods under the GATT (now WTO) Valuation Agreement, and the rules (both preferential and non-preferential) for determining “country of origin.” The course covers the entry and record-keeping process for imports, intellectual property enforcement at the border, CBP’s penalty regime, the use of preferential trade programs (specifically examining the North American Free Trade Agreement and its attendant Rules of Origin and Regional Value Content calculations), duty drawback, foreign trade zones, and other duty-reduction mechanisms. The course provides a detailed analysis of income tax transfer pricing rules in relation to customs valuation including post-importation adjustments, royalties, and other intangibles. Finally, the text covers the regulation of trade in art, antiquities, and cultural property.  Finally, “Customs Law” covers the system of judicial review by the U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Directed research is an independent scholarly project of your own design, meant to lead to the production of an original work of scholarship. Once you have secured a faculty advisor and have defined your project, you should download the directed research form (see below). In this form, indicate whether you are seeking one unit (a 15 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.) or two units (a 30 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.).

Complete information and the application form are available on the secure Directed Research web page »

Doing Deals: Accounting in Action

Class Number: 4855; Catalog Number- Law 659E, 09A

STUDENTS WHO HAVE PREVIOUSLY TAKEN ACCOUNTING OR FINANCE COURSES ARE NOW PERMITTED TO TAKE THIS CLASS ON A PASS/FAIL BASIS ONLY WHICH WILL TAKE UP THREE OF THEIR SIX PASS/FAIL HOURS. 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: None 

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: This course is designed for those liberal arts majors who know nothing about accounting and finance. Students will learn about the fundamental financial statement concepts. Then the course will turn to the study of how lawyers use those concepts in practice.

Doing Deals: Commercial Real Estate Transactions

Class Number: 4856; Catalog Number- Law 659G, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elliott & Prof. Taylor

Prerequisite: Real Estate Finance (concurrent okay) and Contract Drafting

Grading Criteria: Midterm, Class Participation, Drafting of Documents

Enrollment: 20

Description: This course will concentrate on sales, finance and leasing of commercial real estate. It will require significant amounts of time devoted to financial analysis of real estate projects and to negotiating and drafting of documents. It is designed specifically to include JD, LLM, and MBA students. Work groups will consist of JD, LLM, and MBA students working together as lawyer and client to analyze, negotiate and document the acquisition and subsequent leasing of a shopng center. The text for the course is a business school real estate finance text. Legal materials will be made available as handouts. A basic knowledge of Excel will be helpful but not required.

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting
  • Class Number: 4932; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 09A 
  • Class Number: 4914; Catalog Number- Law 659A, MCL
  • Class Number: 4891; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04A
  • Class Number: 4888; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04B 
  • Class Number: 4889; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04C 
  • Class Number: 4912; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04D 
  • Class Number: 4890; Catalog Number- Law 659A, 04E 

NOTE: CONTRACT DRAFTING AND DEAL SKILLS WILL BE PREREQUISITES TO ALL DOING DEALS CAPSTONE COURSES

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (highly recommended as prerequisite, but can be taken concurrently)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course teaches students the principles of drafting commercial agreements. Although the course will be of particular interest to students pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

In this course, students will learn how transactional lawyers translate the business deal into contract provisions, as well as techniques for minimizing ambiguity and drafting with clarity. Through a combination of lecture, hands-on drafting exercises, and extensive homework assignments, students will learn about different types of contracts, other documents used in commercial transactions, and the drafting problems the contracts and documents present. The course will also focus on how a drafter can add value to a deal by finding, analyzing, and resolving business issues.

The grade will be based on specific homework assignments and class participation.

Doing Deals: Corporate Practice

Class Number: 4857; Catalog Number- Law 659H, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. New & Prof. Mazzone

Prerequisite: Business Associations

Grading Criteria: Written Problems and Class Participation

Enrollment: 12

Description: The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting. This course will provide students with broad exposure to a variety of corporate problems, including contract negotiation and drafting typical of current corporate practice, complex corporate structuring issues, joint ventures, and non-litigation corporate dispute resolution. The course exercises will involve questions of corporate, tax, employment, and debtor-creditor law. Although prior course work in these areas is not required, it is preferable to have some interest in and familiarity with these areas.

Because student participation is essential for the success of this practice-simulation course, attendance is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade. This course also requires collaborative work with other students and meetings with the adjunct faculty. You will be required to schedule several meetings in addition to regular class time. In addition, any students on the wait list for this class must attend the first class meeting, which sets the stage for the first several weeks of assignments.

Doing Deals: Deal Skills
  • Class Number: 4858; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04A 
  • Class Number: 4863; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04B
  • Class Number: 4878; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04D
  • Class Number: 4879; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04E 
  • Class Number: 4880; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04F 
  • Class Number: 4892; Catalog Number- Law 659B, 04G

NOTE: CONTRACT DRAFTING AND DEAL SKILLS WILL BE PREREQUISITES TO ALL DOING DEALS CAPSTONE COURSES

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Contract Drafting (required – concurrent not okay); Business Associations

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: Deal Skills will introduce students to business and legal issues common to commercial transactions, whether a multi-billion dollar M&A deal, a license agreement, a commercial real estate transaction or a financing transaction. Among the topics to be covered are the lawyer’s role as the translator of the business deal into contract concepts, client interviewing and communication, negotiation, due diligence, corporate actions and records, indemnities, transaction management, closings, and ethical issues. The course will be conducted through workshop exercises, in-class role-plays, and lecture, and will also include out-of-class due diligence, negotiation and other exercises.

Doing Deals: Mergers & Acquisitions Workshop

Class Number: 4874; Catalog Number- Law 659J, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent not okay); Contract Drafting; Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Participation in Simulated Transaction, Written Assignments and Class Participation (NO EXAM)

Enrollment: 12

Description: This class is designed to provide law school students who intend to practice transactional law with some of the basic practical skills required to counsel companies with respect to business combinations. The focus of the course will be to identify and discuss the factors involved in a typical business combination, the roles of the parties and the relevant documents. The course is intended to ease the transition from law school to junior transactional associate.

Doing Deals: Negotiated Corporate Transactions 

Class Number: 4869; Catalog Number- Law 659K, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent not okay); Contract Drafting; Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Course Work and Class Participation

Enrollment: 12

Description: This class will enable the students to develop the types of skills needed for success in a transactional based law practice. Emphasis will be placed on the development of interviewing, drafting, and negotiation skills. The students will work through a hypothetical transaction that will be focal point of the entire semester. The class will be divided between the lawyers representing the buyer and the lawyers representing the seller. Students will interview the Professor (client) throughout the semester and develop goals, strategies, and documents that will meet the needs of the client. The semester will include the drafting and negotiation of a confidentiality agreement, letter of intent, development and review of a due diligence data room and will culminate in the drafting and negotiation of a final purchase agreement.

Doing Deals: Venture Capital

Class Number: 4859; Catalog Number- Law 659C, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBD

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting, Deal Skills,

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course will study the business and legal issues in venture capital transactions. The course will be taught primarily through simulations.

Education Law & Policy: Education Reform at a Crossroads

Class Number: 4896; Catalog Number- Law 662, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Waldman, Randee

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class exercises and final paper

Description: This course will survey constitutional, statutory and policy issues affecting children in our public elementary and secondary schools. An emphasis will be placed on issues that impact the children most at risk for educational failure and that contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline. Topics will include the right to an education, school discipline, special education, alternative educational programs, No Child Left Behind and high stakes testing, the rights of homeless youth and youth in foster care, and laws designed to address bullying in our schools.

Employment Discrimination

Class Number: 4925; Catalog Number- Law 669, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shanor, Charlie

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: This course will focus on development of law and policy under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Equal Pay Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Employment Discrimination Lab

Class Number: 4870; Catalog Number- Law 669X, 06A

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Shultz & Prof. King

Prerequisite: Employment Discrimination or Employment Law

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Enrollment: (cap of 8 students)

Description: The class will work though an employment law case from meeting the client to a mock jury trial. The students will be divided into 2 law firms. One firm represents the Plaintiff and the other firm represents the Defendant. The classes are lead by Chad Shultz and Carlton King Jr., but this is an interactive class that encourages group discussion and student participation. The written assignments will include a demand letter (Plaintiff’s firm), a response to the demand letter (defense); summary judgment brief and reply (simplified and limited to no more than 8 pages). Each student will also participate in deposing a witness, argue the motion for summary judgment, and play a role in the trial of the case. This is a hands-on class that will allow you prosecute and defend an employment case from start to finish.

Entertainment Law

Class Number: 4812; Catalog Number- Law 720, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Sanders, Scott

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property, or Trademark Law, or Copyright Law (concurrent okay)

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will provide an overview of the rapidly developing body of law associated with the entertainment industries concentrating in the areas of music publishing and commercial recording, live performance, literary publishing and motion pictures. The course will focus on a study of entertainment law cases, aspects of copyright law, personal rights and negotiation of entertainment agreements.

Estate Planning

Class Number: 4813; Catalog Number- Law 916, 02A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Pennell, Jeff

Prerequisite: Trusts & Estates [There are no tax course prerequisites for Estate Planning]

Grading Criteria: Take Home Exam

Description: Selected problems in estate analysis and planning involving drafting of wills and trusts utilizing future interests, class gifts, powers of appointment, generation-skipping arrangements, and qualification for the marital deduction. Consideration of planning for business interests, insurance, and employee benefits also is included.

Ethics of Criminal Justice Practice 

Class Number: 5378; Catalog Number- Law 700

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Tatum, Melissa 

Prerequisite: Must be a 2L or 3L.

Grading Criteria: In-class Final Exam

Description: This course is designed to allow students to apply ethical rules in a criminal law context.  To learn, through interpretation and practical application of the Model Code of Conduct, how trial attorneys navigate ethics and professionalism in a courtroom setting.  Special issues and obligations of prosecutors, defense attorneys, and judges will be reviewed and discussed.

European Union Law II

Class Number: 5300; Catalog Number- Law 620L

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructors: Prof. Mickevicius & Prof. Tulibacka

Prerequisite: EU Law I recommended

Grading Criteria: Exam, Participation

Description: The course examines fundamental areas of substantive law of the European Union, with particular emphasis on their practical application and on their links and parallels with U.S. law. It will commence with the examination of the law and legal practice related to the European single market: free movement of persons, including the evolving concept of EU citizenship; goods; establishments and services; and capital. A number of hours will be devoted to the complex EU antitrust law, its enforcement, and its relationship to the U.S. antitrust rules. The analysis of the European Union’s market legislation and legal practice will be completed by a class on EU consumer law, which in many ways differs from the U.S. approach to consumer protection.

Further, students will scrutinize the European Product Liability Directive, and its parallels with the U.S. products liability law, followed by the examination of the EU framework for the Environmental protection.

Finally, the course will examine substantive and procedural aspects of the EU criminal law and other issues within the rapidly developing area of freedom, security and justice, and discuss the emerging areas of the EU civil procedure, including collective actions and ADR. Lectures and discussions will draw parallels with the U.S. federal and State systems.

Most classes will consist of a lecture part and an interactive seminar part where students will deal with the judgments of the Court of Justice of European Union, hypothetical cases, resolve legal problems, and discuss ideas.

Evidence

Class Number: 4875; Catalog Number- Law 632X, 04A

MUST BE TAKEN IN THE SECOND YEAR

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. McCoyd, Matthew

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: A general consideration of the law of evidence with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Coverage includes relevance, hearsay, witnesses, presumptions and burdens of proof, writings, scientific and demonstrative evidence, and privilege.

Externships 

Class Number: Multiple; Catalog Number- Law 870

Credit: Varies 

Program Director: Prof. Shalf, Sarah 

Description: Step outside the classroom and learn to practice law from experienced attorneys. Take the skills and principles you learn in the classroom and learn how they apply in practice. Emory Law's General Externship Program provides work experience in different types of practice (all sectors except law firms) so you can determine which suits you best and develop relationships that will continue as you begin your lega career. Students are supported in their placements by a weekly class metting with other students in similar placements, taught by faculty with practice experience in that area, in which students have the opportunity to learn legal and professional skills they need to succeed in the externship, receive mentoring independent of their on-site supervisors, and to step back and reflect on their experience and what they are learning from it. 

Our Small Firm Externship Program provides students specially interested in the small law firm practice setting with experience in specially-selected small law firms. The firms' attorneys participate with the students in our weekly class meeting, which focuses on the skills and attributes necessary to succeed in a small firm practice setting. 

Students apply for externships via Symplicity in the semester prior to the externship and all placements must be preapproved. Available placements for the General program are listed on the Emory Law website, http://law.emory.edu/academics/academic-programs/externships/externship-search.html, and the currently-participating Small Firms are listed here: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/small-firm-externship-applicant-law-firm-ranking/

Family Law I

Class Number: 4860; Catalog Number- Law 633, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Broyde, Michael

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will address the problems, policies, and laws related to the formation and dissolution of the marital relationship. Among the topic covered will be marriage, divorce, child custody and other related topics.

Federal Income Tax: Corporations

Class Number: 4814; Catalog Number- Law 642, 02A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Fowler, Lynn

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax 

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: Survey of the general structure of taxation of corporations. Considers the tax issues arising from the formation, operation, liquidation, and reorganization of corporations. An important course for anyone interested in transactional law.

Federal Income Tax: Individuals

Class Number: 4941; Catalog Number- Law 640L, 08A

Credit: 4 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Brown, Dorothy 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: An introduction to federal income taxation with an emphasis on determination of income subject to taxation, which expenses are allowable deductions and whether certain income is excluded from taxation, along with the proper time for reporting items of income and deductions and which proper taxpayer should pay the tax

Federal Income Tax: Partnerships

Class Number: 4815; Catalog Number- Law 942, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Beaudrot, Charles 

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course examines the taxation of partnerships, joint ventures, and LLCs. We will look at the formation, financing, and operation of these entities to understand the impact the tax rules have on financial returns and investment structures. This is an essential class for those interested in venture capital, private equity, real estate, or international business transactions.

Foreign Relations Law 

Class Number: 5025; Catalog Number- Law 602

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Dudziak, Mary

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

Grading Criteria: In-class Final Exam 

Description: This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines that regulate the conduct of American foreign relations. The topics include the distribution of foreign affairs powers between the three branches of the federal government, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the scope of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements, the preemption of state foreign affairs activities, and the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign affairs cases. 

In Spring 2016, we will focus especially on presidential war power, congressional authorizations for the use of military force, and the balance of constitutional powers on other matters related to war and peace.

Fundamentals of Innovation II

Class Number: 4816; Catalog Number- Law 890A, 04A

OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Morris, Nicole 

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property

Description: Innovation and technological change are critical to wealth creation in today’s global economy. However the process that often begins in the research lab traveling a path towards product development, market development, product commercialization and life cycle management is uncertain and typically difficult. More often than not, ideas will “die the good death” well before given the opportunity to develop into profitable markets. Fundamentals of Innovation I is first of a two-course sequence on the various techniques and approaches needed to understand the innovation process within the context of technology commercialization. In the Fall semester, the course is focused on 1) helping students develop an understanding of innovation basics including the overall innovation process and roles and skills of various key players; 2) discussing patterns of technology change and alternate management processes for each; 3) organizing the innovation team and developing frameworks that foster team creativity; 4) understanding forms and protections afforded Intellectual Property; and 5) discussing early stage approaches to product definition (working models to engineering prototypes) and preliminary market definition.

The fall course and the companion course in the spring will provide the academic core to the student’s first year in the Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results (“TI:GER”) program and will be taught as a series of learning modules. Each module and class session is lead by a faculty or guest instructor with in depth experience in that particular technology commercialization topic. Students will take each course as a “community of participants” and will participate on both an individual and team level. Innovation teams that are comprised of the PhD candidates, MBA and JD students, will be formed mid-semester and will participate both in in-class activities and cases, as well as in an “engaged learning” experience intended to simulate the technology commercialization process. The technology/research that will drive the innovation teams will be provided by the PhD candidates and their advisors.

Health Law

Class Number: 4907; Catalog Number- Law 736, 12A (Satz)

Class Number: 4957; Catalog Number- Law 736, 12B (Ahdieh) 

Credit: 3 hours

Instructors: Prof. Satz & Prof. Ahdieh 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Health care is one of the largest sectors of the economy, and the practice of health law is growing. This course is an introduction to regulatory health law. The course will address select topics in health law, including: regulation of physicians and health care institutions, confidentiality, informed consent, individual and institutional obligations to provide care, discrimination in access to care, public and private health insurance structures, and some of the major statutes that govern health care providers. Health care is heavily regulated and the regulations can become trip-wires for the unwary. The course is intended to teach fundamental skills necessary to be a practicing lawyer who advises health care providers and suppliers. The class will not focus on health policy; health policy will be discussed only as background to understanding the regulatory framework within which a practicing health lawyer advises clients.

Legal Issues in Higher Education 

Class Number: 5296; Catalog Number- Law 665

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Fowler, Paul 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Case Briefs; Class Presentation; Outline Paper; and Case Study/Final Exam.  

Description: The course has been designed to expose the student to a range of administrative challenges at the postsecondary level that entail legal and ethical implications. The course experiences should ultimately help current and prospective administrators to envision the legal dimensions of collegiate-level decision processes.  Among the topics to be discussed will be the bases from which higher education law originates, current (case, state and regulatory) law, as well as risk management and liability issues for higher education. 

Human Rights: Introduction & Selected Problems 

Class Number: 4894; Catalog Number- Law 690, 02A. *Cross-listed with School of Psychology for 2-credits. 

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Perry, Michael  

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam.  

DescriptionIn spring semester of 2016, the course will focus on poverty as a human rights issue.  We will address these questions, among others:  Is there a human right—or, more precisely, a set of related human rights—to the basic necessities of life, such as food, clothing, shelter, healthcare, and education?  If so:  What exactly is the right?  What role should courts be asked to play, if any, in protecting the right?  The final exam will be of the “take home” variety.

Income Taxation of Trusts, Estates, Grantors, and Beneficiaries 

Class Number: 5826; Catalog Number- Law 911

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Pennell, Jeff 

PrerequisiteThere is no prerequisite. Highly recommended is concurrent or prior enrollment in the basic Income Taxation course, and prior completion of Trusts & Estates

Grading Criteria: In-class Midterms & Final Exam.  

Description: The income taxation of trusts, estates, grantors, and beneficiaries (Internal Revenue Code Subchapter J) affects virtually every fiduciary entity and imposes the highest income tax rates in America. This course focuses on the basic application of Sub J to garden variety trusts and estates, and explores the grantor trust rules that trump those basic rules. We will attend to specifics of planning with “intentionally defective grantor trusts,” postmortem income tax planning, dealing with income in respect of a decedent, charitable trusts, foreign trusts, Subchapter S and Electing Small Business Trusts, and state income taxation of trusts that straddle state borders.

Intellectual Property (Survey)

Class Number: 6169; Catalog Number- Law 608

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Vertinsky, Liza

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class Exam

Description: This course will serve as an introduction to patent, trademark, and copyright law. The course will explore the policy and legal foundations for these areas of law and the scope of protection which each affords. The requirements for protection will be examined and compared. The framework for the administrative procedures which support the patent and trademark systems will also be discussed. In part, the course will direct attention to questions about the legitimacy of these forms of property and appropriateness of protection. The course will also explore intellectual property transactions and the ways in which they shape and facilitate the distribution, commercialization and use of ideas, creative expression, technologies, and information.

International Business Transactions

Class Number: 4895; Catalog Number- Law 730, 02A (Dean)

Class Number: 4956; Catalog Number- Law 730, 02B (Ahdieh) 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Dean & Prof. Ahdieh 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will be a survey of practical issues that arise in cross-border transactions, including both outbound and inbound (from a US perspective) trade and investment transactions. We will discuss issues that affect transactions involving international trading of goods, project development and acquisitions. Topics will include letters of credit, international trade terms such as INCOTERMS, joint venture agreements, and international transfer of technology. We will also cover some selected aspects of government regulation of international trade and investment.

International Human Rights

Class Number: 5825; Catalog Number- Law 690L, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Van der Vyver, Johan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam or Essay

Description: This course focuses on international concerns for the upholding of human rights standards in legal systems of the world. It defines the concept of human rights, and distinguishes different categories of human rights that have developed over the years, namely (a) natural rights of the individual; (b) civil and political rights; (c) economic, social and cultural rights; and (d) solidarity rights. General problems relating to the theoretical basis of human rights will come under the spotlight in this section, including the universality and relativity of human rights, and the right to self-determination of peoples.

The course further deals with mechanisms for the protection and promotion of international human rights at three distinct levels: (a) globally, under auspices of the United Nations Organization, with emphasis on the binding effect of the human rights standards enunciated in the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, promotion and protection of those rights by the Human Rights Council, and the proclamation and enforcement of certain categories of rights in virtue of international conventions and covenants sponsored by the United Nations; (b) regionally, in Europe under auspices of the Council of Europe, the European Union, and the Helsinki Accord, in the Americas under auspices of the Organization of American States; and in Africa under auspices of the African Union; and (c) thematically, under auspices of specialized agencies such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) and UNESCO.

When dealing with the promotion and protection of human rights under auspices of the United Nations, special attention will be given to the question whether or not the provisions in the U.N. Charter dealing with human rights are self-executing in the United States, and decisions of the Human Rights Council dealing with, for example, the defamation of a religion, and human rights violations committed by Israel in the West Bank and in Gaza. We have also singled out particular rights and freedoms for closer scrutiny, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion or belief, and the international protection of rights of the child.

The section on the Council of Europe pays special attention to the doctrine of a margin of appreciation developed by the European Court of Human Rights, which affords to High Contracting Parties a first bite at the cherry to decide whether circumstances exist in their respective countries that would warrant limitations to be imposed on particular rights or freedoms enunciated in the European Convention for the Protection of Basic Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, and to the doctrine of positive obligations, which places on High Contracting Parties a duty to protect persons under their jurisdiction against violations of their rights by the State and by non-State actors. It further focuses on a selection of judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, such as those relating to torture, sexual orientation, and extradition constraints (the latter involving the United States).

The section on the Inter-American system for the protection of human rights singles out decisions of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights that condemned the United States for not observing basic principles of the Inter-American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man of 1948, for example ones that dealt with racial discrimination in the sentencing of convicted criminals, the death penalty, abortions, and non-compliance by the United States with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations.

The latter set of cases will also bring into contention three judgments of the International Court of Justice condemning the United States for non-compliance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and responses of the U.S. Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court of Germany to those judgments. The enforcement of international human rights in federal courts of the United States in cases such as Medéllin v.

Texas and in virtue of the Alien Torts Statute and Article 1, Section 8, Paragraph 10 of the U.S. Constitution places the Vienna Convention judgments in a broader perspective.

International Humanitarian Law

Class Number: 4876; Catalog Number- Law 676, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Van der Vyver, Johan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam or essay

Description: September 11th, the war in Afghanistan and in Iraq, and the status of Afghani captives being held at Guantanamo Bay; the testing and stockpiling of weapons of mass destruction; the violent conflict in Israel and Palestine, and in Libya; and attempts to establish an Islamic State (ISIS) in Syria and Iraq are all matters that come within the range of international humanitarian law: the law of armed conflict. International humanitarian law applies to and in times of armed conflict and differentiates between international armed conflicts and armed conflicts not of an international character. The war in Bosnia/Herzegovina and jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) illustrate the complexities attending that distinction. The U.S. Supreme Court decided in the Hamdan Case that the “war against terror” is an armed conflict not of an international character because it is not a war between States. This view is at odds with jurisprudence of the ICTY and the International Criminal Court (ICC). It is also extremely difficult to establish precisely under what conditions an internal uprising would be considered an armed conflict for the purposes of international humanitarian law.

The rules of international humanitarian law fall into two main categories:

(a) the ius ad bellum (the law relating to armed conflict): under what circumstances is the taking up of arms to resolve an international or internal dispute legitimate, and when would it constitute the international crime of aggression?

(b) the ius in bello (the law applying in times of war), which comprises two main subject-matters:

The rules regulating the means and methods of conducting hostilities (what weapons may be used, and what persons or objects may be targeted);

How must belligerent parties treat persons and objects not engaged in, or used for, actual combat, such as the wounded or sick members of the armed forces in the field; the wounded, sick or shipwrecked members of the armed forces at sea; prisoners of war; and civilians.

Under (a), the course will explore the legitimacy of, for example, wars of liberation, the right to self-defense, and humanitarian intervention, with special emphasis on the war in Iraq, the Israeli offensive in Gaza, the use of armed force in Libya, and the current bombing campaign in Syria and Iraq. Under (b)(i), questions such as the legality of the threat or use of a wide spectrum of armament, ranging from dumdum bullets to nuclear, bacteriological and chemical weapons, as well as legitimate/illegitimate targets of an armed attack, will be considered. Under (b)(ii), matters such as the treatment of prisoners of war and of the wounded and sick

soldiers, and the protection of civilians and civilian objects, including cultural property, in times of war will come under the spotlight.

Particular problems that have emerged from recent judgments of the ICC and of the Supreme Court of Israel include the conscription and enlistment, and the use in actual combat, of children under the age of 15 years, and the use of a human shield to protect legitimate military targets from an armed attack.

International Humanitarian Law Clinic

Class Number: 4852; Catalog Number- Law 676C

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Blank, Laurie

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: International Law; International Humanitarian Law; International Criminal Law; International Human Rights; Counter-terrorism Law

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance 

Enrollment: By application

Description: The International Humanitarian Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to do real-world work on issues relating to international law and armed conflict, counter-terrorism, national security, transitional justice and accountability for atrocities. Students work directly with organizations, including international tribunals, militaries and non-governmental organizations, under the supervision of the Director of the IHL Clinic, Professor Laurie Blank. The IHL Clinic also includes a weekly class seminar with lecture and discussion introducing students to the foundational framework of and contemporary issues in international humanitarian law (otherwise known as the law of armed conflict).

International Law

Class Number: 4818; Catalog Number- Law 732, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. An-Na’im, Abdullah 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: The objective of this course is to introduce students to the general principles of Public International Law from a critical contemporary perspective; and to discuss the challenges to the structural and institutional limitations of that state-centric legal order in its global political context. The underlying theme will also include the implications of global transformations in the actors and processes of the rule of law in international relations.

International Patent Law

Class Number: 5299; Catalog Number- Law 754B

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Bagley, Margo

Prerequisite: None

Grading CriteriaTake home exam and short response papers

DescriptionThis course will provide an introduction to key aspects of U.S., international, and comparative patent law and the myriad policies at play in ongoing global patent harmonization conflicts. The value of patents is increasing in many areas while at the same time the scope of patent-eligible subject matter is in flux. We will explore the impact of these forces in the creation and implementation of international agreements concerning patents, such as the Paris Convention, Patent Cooperation Treaty, the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property, and various bilateral agreements. 
Against the backdrop of the U.S patent system, we also will consider the importance of regional patent systems such as the European Patent Convention, as well as features of other major patent players such as China and Japan, and emerging players such as India, and Brazil. A discussion of current issues such as access to medicines, protection of traditional knowledge, multinational patent litigation, and the patenting of controversial inventions will be an integral part of the course."

Text: Margo A. Bagley, Ruth L. Okediji & Jay A. Erstling, International Patent Law and Policy(West Publishing 2013).

Introduction to the American Legal System 

NOTE: OPEN ONLY TO FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS AND JM STUDENTS

Class Number: 4954; Catalog Number- Law 570A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructors: Prof. Mathews & Prof. Price

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Study of the rules (primarily the ABA’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct) and deeper principles that govern the legal profession, including the nature and content of the attorney-client relationship, conflicts of interest, appropriate advocacy, client identity in business contexts, ethics in negotiation, and issues of professionalism.

Introduction to Legal Advocacy (ILA) formerly LWRAP II

Class Number: 4837; Catalog Number- Law 535B, AJD

Credits: 2 hours

Instructors:  Profs. Carroll, Kirk, Mathews, Parrish, Romig, Schwartz

Prerequisite:  ILARC (or an equivalent course)

Grading Criteria: Class assignments 

Description:  This course builds on skills presented in ILARC and introduces students to the process of effectively employing persuasive strategies in both written and oral formats.

Introduction to Law & Economics

Class Number: 4904; Catalog Number- Law 628Y, 08A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, Joanna

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final Exam

Enrollment: 80

Description: This course introduces students to the economic analysis of the law.  Because economics provides a tool for studying how legal rules affect the way people behave, understanding economic analysis of legal problems has become an important part of a lawyer's education.  The ability to predict the effects of legal rules helps the practicing lawyer furnish advice and make arguments before courts. It is also a prerequisite for the evaluation of legal policy.  Over the last twenty-five years, the economic approach has grown in importance in academia as well as in legal and judicial practice. The course will explore several economic methods and concepts and apply them to illuminate and critique familiar areas of law, including criminal law, torts, contracts, property, and civil procedure.  There are no prerequisites for this course; a background in economics is not necessary (or even very helpful).

Islamic Law

Class Number: 5377; Catalog Number- Law 627

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. An-Na’im, Abdullah

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Attendance; In-class Final Exam

Description: The objective of this course is to introduce students to the nature, sources and techniques of Islamic Law (Shari‘a- the normative system of Islam), and its main concepts, principles and rules.  Class discussions will also focus on the relationship between Shari‘a and modern legal systems, as well as its social and cultural impact on present Islamic societies.

Following a discussion of the nature, sources and early development of Shari‘a, we will review the main substantive aspects of this jurisprudential tradition in the fields of property and transactions, family law, criminal law, constitutional law and inter-communal (international) law. The last part of the course will examine the relationship between Shari‘a and the legal systems of modern states, taking the legal systems of Iran and Pakistan as case studies. We will also discuss recent “Arab Spring” constitutional developments in Tunisia and Morocco.

Jewish Law

Class Number: 4901; Catalog Number- Law 664, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Broyde, Michael 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper or Take-Home Exam

Description: This course will survey the principles Jewish (or Talmudic) law uses to address difficult legal issues and will compare these principles to those that guide legal discussion in America. In particular, this course will focus on issues raised by advances in medical technology such as surrogate motherhood, artificial insemination, and organ transplant. Through discussion of these difficult topics many areas of Jewish law will be surveyed.

Jury Dynamics/ Jury Selection 

Class Number: 5379; Catalog Number- Law 654

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. McCoyd, Matthew

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria

Description: TBA

Juvenile Defender Clinic

Class Number: 4819; Catalog Number- Law 699C

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Waldman, Randee 

Prerequisite: Priority will be given to students who have taken or are currently enrolled in: Kids in Conflict with the Law, Juvenile Law or Family Law 2; Criminal Procedure; and Evidence.

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance 

Description: The Juvenile Defender Clinic is an in-house legal clinic dedicated to providing holistic legal representation for children charged with delinquency and status offenses.   Student attorneys represent clients in juvenile court and provide legal advocacy in school discipline, special education and mental health matters, when such advocacy is derivative of a client's juvenile court case.  

Under the supervision of the clinic's director, Randee Waldman, student attorneys are responsible for handling all aspects of client representation. While in the clinic, JDC students will: Establish an attorney-client relationship with their client(s); Direct case strategy determinations; Investigate allegations; Interview witnesses; Negotiate dispositions and plea agreements; Prepare and litigate motions, and Try cases.

Students are also encouraged to engage in research and participate in juvenile justice policy development.

Applications are accepted via Symplicity or e-mail to professor Waldman prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

Law & Economic Development: Theory & Practice 

Class Number: 5295; Catalog Number- Law 628B

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Lee, Steve

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam

DescriptionLaw and development addresses the impact of law, legal frameworks, and institutions (LFIs) on development. LFIs have indeed significant impacts on development, particularly economic development. Recognizing this importance, the post-2015 development initiatives by the United Nations (“Sustainable Development Goals” or “SDGs”) includes rule of law as a development agenda.

The course explores the theories and practices pertaining to law and development. In particular, the course explains how LFIs affect economic development in several key areas relevant to economic development, such as property rights (including intellectual property rights); legal framework for political governance; regulatory framework for business transactions; industrial promotion; taxation; corporate governance; competition law; environment; banking and financing; labor; corruption; criminalization and development; and international legal framework: international economic law and international development law.

Law in Public Health

Class Number: 4823; Catalog Number- Law 736A, 04A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kocher, Prof. Ghosh, & Prof. Hoyt

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Based on a combination of attendance, classroom participation, and take-home exam/paper

Description: Law and public health are tightly intertwined.  Law students can benefit from an improved understanding of the legal principles and laws underlying the complex and cross-disciplinary field of public health practice in the United States. This course surveys law as it defines public health and is used by local, state, and federal government agencies as a tool to address contemporary public health problems in the United States.  The course features a cross-disciplinary emphasis on the link between both the law and science of public health practice.  The course specifically addresses foundational sources for public health law in the United States, including constitutional, statutory, regulatory, and case law.  In addition, this course provides an examination of controlling law and emerging legal issues associated with selected topics drawn from bioterrorism, natural disasters, and other public health emergencies; public health surveillance and outbreak investigations; public health research and health information; special populations (including, for example, persons with mental disabilities, prisoners, children, and homeless populations); and key public health topical areas, such as vaccination; food-borne diseases; tobacco use-related problems; and injuries.  Topics are covered through a combination of lecture and classroom discussion of assigned readings.  Readings are assigned from the required text, selected cases, and articles published in the medical, public health, and other scientific literature.  In addition to the listed course instructors, other instructors will include a rich array of expert guest lecturers from the practice community.

Law of International Organizations 

Class Number: 5301; Catalog Number- Law 735

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Tkeshelashvili, David

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Attendance; Participation; Essays; and take-home Final Exam. 

Description: The course begins with an introductory discussion of relevant principles of international law and overview of the law of international organizations. General principles of the law of international organizations, legal personality and membership issues will be discussed in the first part of the course. In the next part, the system of the United Nations will be introduced and relevant legal and policy issues will be examined.  The laws of different international and regional institutions, including the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the European Union (EU), the African Union (AU) and the Organization of American States (OAS) will be discussed in the third part of the course. In the next chapter we will overview the international judiciary system, including the International Court of Justice (ICJ), the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). The critical role which the international non-governmental organizations play in the system of international organizations will be discussed at the end of the course.

Finally, the application of relevant legal, theoretical and policy principles of the law of international organizations on selected topics will be examined.   The annexation of Crimea, the Greek Crisis and the global threat of terrorism, climate change and the threat of pandemics such as the Ebola Virus, are proposed cases for seminar type discussions.

Legal Profession
  • Class Number: 4820; Catalog Number- Law 747, 12A (Elliott)
  • Class Number: 5308; Catalog Number- Law 747, 12B (Goldfeder)

STUDENTS CONSIDERING A LITIGATION FIELD PLACEMENT IN THEIR THIRD YEAR ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO TAKE LEGAL PROFESSION.

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elliott & Prof. Goldfeder 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: The rules and principles of professional ethics, other regulatory constraints on lawyers, the elements of malpractice liability and the values of professionalism.

Litigation Analytics 

Class Number: 6097; Catalog Number- Law 737

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Albertelli, Jim

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria

Description: TBA

Litigating Identity in the Age of Scientific Advancement 

Class Number: 5026; Catalog Number- Law 877

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. McCoyd, Matthew 

Prerequisite: Evidence 

Grading Criteria

Description: Since the early 1990’s the use of DNA evidence has established the innocence of over 300 individuals convicted of crimes that they did not commit, including 18 individuals who served time on death row. In the past few years, advances in the science of determining the origins of fires have led to the release of individuals previously convicted of arson. Currently, the method that most police departments have traditionally utilized in identifying suspects, the “six pack” photo array, is being challenged on scientific grounds as causing an alarmingly high rate of “false positives,” or false identifications of innocent individuals.

This course will review the use of science in litigating the identity of individuals accused of crimes, and the use of science in seeking the exoneration of individuals convicted of crimes.

Media Law

Class Number: 5380; Catalog Number- Law 722

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Counts, Cynthia 

Prerequisite: None 

Grading CriteriaAttendance, preparation and participation: 10%; Final Exam or Writing Assignment(s): 90%

Description: This class will explore legal issues that are particularly relevant to newspapers, radio and television stations, web operators, and bloggers. Topics include tort liability for defamation and invasion of privacy, prior restraint, the right of the media and public to access government documents, the protection of confidential sources, intellectual property protection for media content, and use of copyrighted material in news broadcasts.  The course will also examine the legality of undercover reporting, deception, and the use of hidden cameras.  The class will analyze and discus the the practical implications of these principles in real-world First Amendment and media cases that were recently litigated.  In class discussions, students will identify, analyze, and critique the constitutional, statutory, and common-law legal doctrines that apply to media law cases, and we will study how those doctrines originated, have evolved, and will continue to change. Among other things, students will analyze and discuss in depth key cases that show how the law and protections for the media have developed and will gain a greater understanding of how the law impacts news reporting today. In addition to the assigned reading, we will discuss current media and First Amendment cases that are raised in the news throughout the course of the semester.  Your grade will be determined based on participation and a take-home final exam or writing assignment, such as a motion for summary judgment in favor of a reporter and media company.

National Security Law

Class Number: 4944; Catalog Number- Law 652, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Blank, Laurie

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria

Description: This course surveys the framework of domestic and international laws that authorize and restrain the pursuit of the U.S. government’s national security policies. Central issues include the sources, foundation and structure of national security law; the participants in the national security system, their constitutional roles, and the nature of power sharing among branches of government; and the law applicable to specific national security issues such as the use of military force, the activities of the intelligence community, and counter-terrorism activities.

Negotiations
  • Class Number: 4821; Law 656, 06A (Athans)  
  • Class Number: 4822; Law 656, 06B (Eldridge)
  • Class Number: 5523; Law 656, 06C (Lytle-Perry)  

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Athans, Prof. Eldridge, & Prof. Lytle-Perry

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class preparation/participation and written assignment – No Exam

COURSE NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE LAW SCHOOL OR NEGOTIATIONS IN THE BUSINESS SCHOOL

Description: This hands-on skills course will explore the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating settlements in both a litigation and a transactional context. The objectives of the course will be to develop proficiency in a variety of negotiation techniques as well as a substantive knowledge of the theory and practice, or the art and science of negotiations. Each week during class, students will negotiate fictitious clients' positions, sometimes proceeded by a lecture and followed by critique and comparison of results with other students. Each problem will be designed to illustrate particular negotiation strategies as well as highlight selected professional and ethical issues. Preparation for class will include development of a negotiation strategy, reflective written memoranda required.

Patent Law 

Class Number: 5027; Catalog Number- Law 754

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Morris, Nicole 

Prerequisite: None, but IP highly recommended. 

Grading Criteria: Participation; In-class Exam.

DescriptionThis course will cover the core topics of U.S. patent law such as patentability, including novelty, non-obviousness, and enablement; infringement; and remedies. The course will examine how patents are used as a business tool to commercialize new technologies and innovations. The course will also review the major aspects of patent reform as codified under the America Invents Act.  The course is designed to provide a solid background for on-patent specialists and for those planning a career in the field.  No technical background is required.  There is no prerequisite for this course.

Patent Litigation

Class Number: ; Catalog Number- Law 754A

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Kodish

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria:

Description: This course explores the major issues not only of procedural and substantive law but also strategic considerations facing a lawyer involved in patent litigation. The course will proceed chronologically through a patent infringement case to be filed in a district court, including jurisdiction, venue, pleadings, discovery, experts, trial preparation, proving infringement and defenses at trial, remedies, and post-verdict issues.  Students will work in groups to prepare various problems and to present arguments in a claim construction or summary judgment hearing.  The course will also explore substantive patent law that is specific to the litigation context, such as patent misuse defenses and the various forms of infringement, such as extraterritorial enforcement of US patents and pharmaceutical litigation over Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). 

Patent Practice & Procedures

Class Number: 5303; Catalog Number- Law 756

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kirsch & Prof. Shortell 

Prerequisite: IP and Patent Law. 

Grading Criteria

Description: This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of patent practice before the U.S. Patent Office (USPTO), by focusing on the drafting of patent claims, patent specifications and responses and amendments to Office Actions, as well as undertaking patent clearance studies.  In addition to learning such skills, students will become familiar with the U.S. patent statutes, USPTO regulations, case law and customs and practice relating to drafting and pursuing patent applications to issuance through the Patent Office.

The course has two primary components:  (1) lectures that introduce the students to the subject matter to be studied, and (2) practical skills-oriented homework and in-class exercises that will allow the students to hone their patent practice skills.

Religion, Culture and Law in Comparative Practice

Class Number: 5302; Catalog Number- Law 711

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor: Prof. Ludsin, Hallie

Prerequisites: None

Grading: Take home exam and short weekly assignments

Description: Debates rage worldwide over what role religion and culture should play in law and governance and whether granting them a role conflicts with democratic principles. Increasingly, religious and ethnic groups are demanding that religious and cultural practices form the basis of the legal system or, at the very least, a separate legal system governing only their members. Western policymakers are finding it difficult to respond to these claims. While they see them as possibly antithetical to the principles of tolerance and equality built into liberal democratic theory, there is something uncomfortable about rejecting these demands when they come from a majority of a population or from a minority group that has suffered severe discrimination. This course will explore the issues that arise in the debates about the appropriate role for religion and culture in democratic governance. It will examine different models for incorporating religion and culture into law as well as at models that wholly reject this incorporation using case studies from the US, Europe, Asia and Africa

Roman Law

Class Number: 5827; Catalog Number- Law 739

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Domingo, Rafael  

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-home Exam

Description: In the thousand years between the Law of the Twelve Tables (451 BC) and Justinian's massive Corpus Iuris Civilis (530 AD), the Romans developed the most sophisticated and comprehensive secular legal system of antiquity.  Roman law is still at the heart of the civil law tradition of the European Continent and some of its former colonies in the Americas, Asia, and Africa, and it was instrumental in the development of international law, the church’s canon law, and the common law tradition.  The Roman lawyers created new legal concepts, ideas, rules and mechanisms that are still applied in the most Western legal systems.

Specifically designed for American law students without a civil law or canon law background, this course introduces the Roman legal system in its social, political, and economic context. The course will cover the fundamental topics of private law (persons, property and inheritance, and obligations); the revival of Roman law in the Middle Ages; and the current impact of Roman law in the era of globalization.   No knowledge of Roman history or of Latin is required, and all materials will be in English translation.

Secured Transactions

Class Number: 4877; Catalog Number- Law 713, 10A 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Pardo, Rafael 

Prerequisite(s): None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will examine the law relating to the creation, perfection, and enforcement of security interests in personal property. Reading and class discussion will center on Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and will include an introduction to the intersection of Article 9 with the federal bankruptcy laws, the creation and status of non-UCC liens on personal property (by operation of law or by execution of a judgment, e.g.), and non-UCC enforcement mechanisms, such as foreclosure, repossession, and garnishment. Attention will also be paid to the business context within which Article 9 operates, ie, debt financing.

Securities: Brokers/Dealers

Class Number: 4946; Catalog Number- Law 673, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Terry, Bob

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: 

Description: This course is intended to be a follow-up course to the Securities Regulation course, which covers registration of new securities issues, disclosure and anti-fraud issues, and the coverage of securities laws. This course approaches securities regulation of the standpoint of the intermediaries between the issuers and purchaser - broker-dealers and investment advisers. It is intended to provide an academic foundation of relevant law, as well as practical information also relevant to a law practice in the area.

Much of the course will focus on the regulatory scheme and activities of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), a self-regulatory body which is the principal day-to-day regulator of the broker-dealer industry. FINRA is the entity with which most broker-dealers and their counsel will typically interact with regard to most regulatory matters.

In addition, the course will look at investment advisers, a rapidly growing piece of the securities industry. An investment adviser is regulated either by the SEC or by state regulators, depending upon its size. Investment advisers are subject to a completely separate regulatory regimen, although there are many examples of overlap with broker-dealer regulatory issues since many firms, or their affiliates, are dually registered.

The interplay between the two regulatory schemes has been the focus of much discussion and legislative and regulatory activity over the past fifteen years, including several parts of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Finally, the course will provide insight into practical considerations of regulatory interaction, in both routine settings as well as enforcement matters.

In addition to private practice, graduating students with an interest in securities might find opportunities with brokerage firms, regulators and public corporations. The combination of the Securities Regulation course and this course should provide graduating students a thorough overview of most of the issues they might see if they enter into a securities-related practice. 

Securities Regulation

Class Number: 5868; Catalog Number- Law 667

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd, George 

Prerequisite: Business Associations 

Grading Criteria: 

Description: A study of federal and state regulation of the issue, distribution, and transfer of securities. Explores the availability of exemptions from registration and the duties of participants in these securities transactions to comply with anti-fraud regulations. Some time is spent on the growing literature appraising securities regulation.

Special Topics in Technology Commercialization II

Class Number: 4849; Catalog Number- Law 892

OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Morris, Nicole 

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: This course will cover special topics in technology commercialization.

Sports & Advertising Law

Class Number: 4824; Catalog Number- Law 693, 10A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Linsky, Melissa

Prerequisite: None 

Grading Criteria: In-class participation, Small Projects, and a Paper

Description: This course will provide a practical overview of the laws governing professional sports and advertising, examining issues relating to the various participants - the fans, the sponsors, the owners, the teams, the leagues, the players and the coaches. Advertising is included in this overview of the laws governing sports because marketing the teams is such an integral part of the operation of a professional sports team and knowledge of the various laws surrounding advertising and promotions would benefit anyone interested in this industry.

Twitter handle for students who register for the class or who are interested in sports law issues to follow: @MsSportsLaw.

State Law Legal Research 

Class Number: 5297; Catalog Number- Law 657F

Credit: 1 hour

ACCELERATED COURSE- Starts Week of January 4, 2016- February 15, 2016.

Instructor: Prof. Sneed, Thomas

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class participation, Small research assignments; and a Final project.

Description: In most legal research classes, the focus is primarily on the resources available for federal law research.  However, few attorneys practice only in the realm of federal law.  Therefore, a detailed discussion of the varied resources for state law research can be less developed in a new lawyer’s skill set.

The concept for this class would be to focus on the states to which the majority of our students locate to practice, with Georgia, New York, Washington D.C. (and the states surroundings the District), Florida and California being the primary focus.  The methods for researching primary law (cases, statutes and regulations) for each state would be discussed, along with an examination of the secondary sources and governmental resources unique to each jurisdiction.  The class would feature in-class activities, homework assignments re-enforcing the research skills examined in class and a final project comparing jurisdictions.

Tax Controversies

Class Number: 4903; Catalog Number- Law 641, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Craft, Shannon (Loechel)

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax

Grading: Paper; In-class Exam

Description: This course will focus on the resolution of federal tax controversies through both administrative procedures and litigation. Specifically, we will consider filing requirements, audit procedures, administrative appeals, deficiencies, assessments, including termination and jeopardy assessments, penalties, interest, and the statute of limitations. Additionally, we will take a practical approach to problems and considerations arising in the litigation of cases before the U.S. Tax Court, District Court, and the Court of Federal Claims, including jurisdictional, procedural, and evidentiary issues. We will examine choice of forum, pleadings, discovery, privileges, and tax trial practice. Finally, we will discuss summons enforcement litigation, civil collection, levy and distraint, and the tax lien and its priorities.

Technology in Legal Practice

Class Number: 4910; Catalog Number- Law 879K, 12A

Accelerated Class: February 15, 2015 – March 28, 2015

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor: Prof. Glon, Christina 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper (Final)

Enrollment: 20

DescriptionTechnology in Legal Practice will provide students with an introduction to concepts and resources relevant to technology and its effect on the practice of law beyond traditional legal research. Areas of coverage will include law practice management, e-discovery, competitive intelligence, and other current awareness issues. Class discussions and readings will be augmented by guest speakers from the legal community. This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the second seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

The First Amendment- Freedom of Speech 

Class Number: 5522; Catalog Number- Law 601B

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Seaman, Julie 

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I 

Grading Criteria: Final Exam 

Description: This course presents a broad overview of the theory and doctrine of freedom of speech under the First Amendment.  After beginning with the seminal opinions of Justices Holmes and Brandeis that launched modern American free speech jurisprudence, we will consider contemporary free speech doctrine including the Court's “categorical” approach, content and viewpoint discrimination, levels of scrutiny, speech compulsions, and expressive association.  Specific areas of study will include incitement, threats, obscenity, commercial speech, defamation, restrictions on student speech, and campaign finance regulation, among others.  The course will include discussion of current controversies such as regulation of hate speech and online speech, funeral picketing, and professional-client speech.

Trial Techniques

Class Number: 4854; Catalog Number- Law 671

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Profs. Zwier, Jones, and Lott. 

This course is required for all 2L Students

Description: The Kessler-Eidson Trial Techniques Program is a required course that introduces students to the evidence issues, ethical dilemmas, and presentation skills essential in the trial of a case. The course has two parts. Part I is designed to integrate the required Evidence class with trial skills. This Spring semester we will look to bring about this integration of evidence and trial techniques by scheduling workshops:

The first workshop, we will conduct a workshop on Case Analysis and Relevance. Your assignment is to have read the first of two assigned simulated jury cases file thoroughly, and the assigned chapters from the Prof. Zwier’s Trial Advocacy: Normative Approach, Lecture Notes & Readings in advance of the workshop.

The second workshop topic will be Direct and Cross, Hearsay and Character Evidence (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). We will conduct a workshop on Direct and Cross examinations, in which student will examine an assigned witness(s) from a simulated case file. You will be assigned to represent either the plaintiff or defendant and accordingly will be required to prepare either a direct or a cross examination of the assigned witness (es).

The third workshop topic will be on Persuasive and Evidentiary Foundations for Exhibits (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). We will conduct a drill on Exhibit Foundations, using specially prepared exhibit problems from the simulated case file. You will be assigned to represent either the plaintiff or defendant and accordingly will be required to prepare relevant exhibit exercises.

The fourth workshop topic will be Jury Selection (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). You will engage in a jury selection exercise for the simulated case file. Again, you will be assigned to conduct voir dire for your client as plaintiff's or defendant's counsel. You will also be assigned to play the role of a prospective juror for purposes of the workshop.

The fifth workshop topic will be Technology in the Courtroom (a video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). You will be asked to utilize the evidence camera and computer display technology using specially prepared exhibits from the simulated case file. You will present on the strengths and weakness from your perspective as plaintiff's or defense counsel, as well as outline and explain your legal strategy, to your client or supervising attorney.

These spring workshops will be conducted by some of Atlanta's finest trial lawyers and evidence teachers. As a result of our bringing them in, you will get an opportunity to work closely with these lawyers (in groups as small as 6-8 students) and not only get their insights about the marriage of practice and theory, but also have a chance to demonstrate your oral advocacy skills to them.

Please note: Two provisions significantly impact the application of these taxes. One is “portability” of a decedent’s estate tax exclusion, and the other is the exclusion itself — which is $5.34 million per taxpayer in 2014 ($10.68 million per married couple) and slated to rise to $5.43 million in 2015 (also double that amount for a married couple). These changes limit application of the wealth transfer taxes to a small segment of the decedent population. As a result, you should enroll only if you intend to become an estate planner for such high net worth clients.

In addition, we have been able to partner with downtown Atlanta law firms and law offices to provide you the opportunity to learn on location at their offices. As a result, when you register you will be able to sign up in groups of 24 at either:

  • Alston & Bird Federal Public Defender's Office Jones Day
  • Kilpatrick Townsend King & Spalding McKenna Long & Aldridge Sutherland Asbill & Brennan Troutman Sanders US Attorney's Office
  • DeKalb County Public Defender's Office
  • Harrison & Ford

You will meet at these offices for certain scheduled workshops. (The opening lecture/demonstration will be held at the law school in Tull Auditorium). For those of you who wish to work with general practitioners from small to medium sized firms and/or with state and federal court judges, you should sign up for the General Practitioner section. This group will be limited to 26 students and will meet in breakout groups of 13 or workshop exercises at the law school.

This year the May program session will run between the last examinations make up day and graduation. The May session presents an intensive week of day long learn-by-doing workshops that build upon the earlier spring semester workshops. The May session will be facilitated by 60 trial attorneys and judges from across the country supplemented by 20 local trial attorneys and judges. Students will conduct bench trials on the case file assigned to them over the spring semester. The program will culminate with students conducting jury trials.

*Because the program starts right after final exams, do not schedule a take-home exam if it will interfere with the start of the program.

To alleviate any conflicts that may arise, the ABA allows you to miss 2 classes (4 hours) in any two-hour course, unexcused. As a result you will be allowed to miss either one Friday afternoon workshop, or one half day of the intensive May session. You must submit a written notice (an email will suffice) for any anticipated absence to your team leader and the KEPTT Administrative Director. You will not be allowed to miss either of the trial days, as you must serve on those days either as trial counsel, or as a witness. All requests for an excused absence must be personally delivered in writing to the KEPTT Administrative Director.

There is a $145 mandatory course materials fee. You will receive two case files, both in electronic and hard copy form, an electronic copy of Prof. Zwier’s Trial Advocacy: Normative Approach, Lecture Notes & Readings, and a digital video chip. Hard copies of the course materials file will be distributed in advance of the first class meeting at copy center. An electronic copy of the course materials will also be made available on the course Blackboard site.

Turner Environmental Law Clinic 

Class Number: 4851; Catalog Number- Law 697C

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Goldstein, Mindy

Prerequisite: Environmental Advocacy (Prerequisite or Co-requisite)

Grading Criteria: Based on individual student performance on various projects assigned. 

Description: The Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides important pro bono legal representation to individuals, community groups, and nonprofit organizations that seek to protect and restore the natural environment for the benefit of the public. Through its work, the clinic offers students an intense, hands-on introduction to environmental law and trains the next generation of environmental attorneys.

Each year, the Turner Environmental Law Clinic provides over 4,000 hours of pro bono legal representation. The key matters occupying our current docket – fighting for clean and sustainable energy; promoting sustainable agriculture and urban farming; and protecting our water, natural resources, and coastal communities—are among the most critical issues for our state, region, and nation. The Clinic’s students benefit and learn from immersion in these real world, complex environmental representations.

Water Resources Law

Class Number: 5028; Catalog Number- Law 617, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructors: Prof. Thompson & Prof. Moore

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation; Take-home projects; Final Exam 

DescriptionThis course will explore various themes common in the practice of environmental and natural resources law, including administrative and civil litigation, permitting, and regulatory development, focusing in the area of water as a resource and water pollution control.  The class will cover concepts in the traditional riparian and prior appropriation rights; the federal Clean Water Act permitting program; drinking water, coastal and wetland protection programs; trans boundary water disputes; as well as the environmental and natural resource problems concerning water quality protection.  Both the statutory language and theoretical application of the issues will be explored with a particular emphasis on the litigation of water issues. 

White Collar Crime

Class Number: 5989; Catalog Number- Law 683

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Cloud, Morgan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Final exam 

Description: This course examines how corporations, their officers, directors, employees and agents can violate the criminal law. The course includes analysis of the responsibilities and potential liabilities of lawyers representing organizational clients

Judicial Opinion Writing: Writing for the Judicial Chambers 

Class Number: 5823; Catalog Number- Law 649

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Parrish, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description:This course will introduce students to the process and practicalities of writing within the context of serving as an appellate court judicial clerk.  The course will explore many topics through assigned readings and class discussion including:  the shifting tone from that of an advocate to that of a decision maker; how the drafting and editing responsibilities are divided between judge and clerk; the ways in which race, gender, religion, past legal background affect judicial decision making; as well as the nuts and bolts of the judicial opinion writing process.

Students will apply what is learned in class to write three pieces during the semester—all within the context of working within an appellate judicial chambers.  During the course of the semester students will write a bench memo, a majority opinion, and a dissenting opinion, which shall be based on the briefs and record in an assigned case.  Thus, those seeking to learn more about the work of judicial clerks or interested in pursuing a clerkship after graduation will get a working familiarity of the unique work and experience of writing within a judicial chambers.

Seminar: Advanced International Negotiations

Class Number: 5030; Catalog Number- Law 842

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Balian, Hrair & Prof. Zwier, Paul

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: After a review of strategies and styles in the two party disputes, this seminar will look at complex multiparty international negotiations, including but not limited to: Border Dispute between Bolivia, Chile and Peru: Selected issue in Middle East Peace-- the “Right of Return”, compensation if right of return cannot be exercised, and “Water Rights” ; Sudan – CPA and Darfur; the Dayton Peace Accords. As basic understandings of dispute and conflict resolution techniques will have been covered in the prerequisite courses, we will consider an number of interdisciplinary readings including readings from Deutsch and Coleman’s Handbook of Conflict Resolution, Theory and Practice, Roger Fisher’s Coping with International Conflict, Mnookin’s Beyond Winning and Kremenyuk’s International Negotiations, which deal with research on the wide array of potential approaches to conflict resolution. (See syllabus.) The student’s paper will be based either on 1) an in depth analysis of one of the class simulations, with a focus on the legitimacy (international law support) of any proposed solution, or 2)on the history, law, methods, practice and theory of an international dispute chosen in consultation with the professor.

Seminar: Animal Law

Class Number: 5031; Catalog Number- Law 837, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Satz, Ani

Grading Criteria: Paper

Prerequisites: None

Enrollment: 16

Description: Animal law is a burgeoning field. Over 135 law schools in North America offer courses in animal law, six specialty journals are devoted to the topic, and at least one poll indicates a career in the area is in the top seven of all desired careers. Whether it is our clothing, food, household products, companions, or back yard, our daily lives are touched by animals. Nonhuman animals are considered property under law, and a sprawling body of federal and state civil and criminal law regulates human use of them.

This seminar will explore our legal and ethical obligations to nonhuman animals, focusing on domestic animals. Selected topics may include: conceptions of animals, standing, exotic pets and public health, animals and housing, companion animal abuse, breed discrimination, working animals, factory farming, zoos, animal fighting, animal racing, animals used in T.V. and film, hunting, animal experimentation, animals and religious freedom, veterinary malpractice, and animal trusts and custody.

Seminar: Arbitration Law- Religious Arbitration in America 

Class Number: 5821; Catalog Number- Law 815

Credit: 3 hours 

Instructor: Prof. Broyde, Michael 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper, presentation, and participation.

Description: This course explores the rise of private arbitration in religious and values-oriented communities and seeks to understand four points. First, why are religious communities flocking to such arbitration?  Second, why is American law so comfortable with such arbitration and is that wise?  Third, what are the proper procedural, jurisdictional and contractual limits of such arbitration?  Finally, this course will explore if such arbitration is not only good for the religious community itself, but having many different faith based arbitrations (when properly limited) is good for any vibrant pluralistic democracy inhabited by diverse faith groups.

Seminar: Corporate Governance 

Class Number: 5822; Catalog Number- Law 821

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Kang, Michael 

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Enrollment: 16

DescriptionThis seminar provides an in-depth, timely study of corporate law and governance from both theoretical and practical perspectives, drawing heavily on academic research about some or all the following issues: theories of the corporation, the role of the board of directors, board composition and structures, institutional investors, shareholder voting and proposals, executive compensation, corporate political spending, the financial crisis, corporate social responsibility, and comparative corporate governance.  The seminar will be graded based on class participation and writing.

Seminar: Due Process

Class Number: 5305; Catalog Number- Law 807

Credits: 3 hours 

Instructor: Prof. Smith, Fred

Prerequisite: None

Grading: Paper 

Description: This course will engage in an in-depth treatment of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendment's Due Process Clauses.  Topics include: the original intended scopes of these two clauses; the evolution of procedural and substantive due process; and contemporary legal settings in which these amendments hold force.  Underlying constitutional themes will include access to courts; fairness; accuracy; finality; representative government; separation of powers; and federalism.

Seminar: The Legality of Armed Interventions 

Class Number: 5304; Catalog Number- Law 806

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Van der Vyver, Johan

Grading Criteria: Paper

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: 16

Description: For many years now, the international community of states has attempted to place an embargo on the use of force as a means of settling international disputes. Article 2(3) of the Charter of the United Nations thus provides: “All Members shall settle their international disputes by peaceful means in such a manner that international peace and security, and justice, are not endangered.” The UN Charter authorized military action in two instances only, namely (a) if the Security Council authorizes an armed intervention as a means of counteracting a situation that constitutes a threat to the peace, a breach of the peace, or an act of aggression (art. 42), and (b) as a matter of individual or collective self-defense if an armed attack occurs against a Member of the United Nations (art. 51). This raises the question whether or not the UN Charter deals comprehensively with instances of armed conflicts that would be lawful under contemporary rules of international humanitarian law.

The United Nations itself recognized armed interventions not mentioned in the UN Charter, for example in the Uniting for Peace Resolution of 1950 affording to the General Assembly the competence to authorize military action to counteract a breach of the peace or an act of aggression, by supporting wars of liberation against colonial rule, foreign occupation, or a racist regime, and by extending the provisions of Article 51 to legalize pre-emptive self-defense action. There is furthermore overwhelming support for upholding the legality of humanitarian intervention to protect a population from acts of supreme repression by their own government. Currently, the ISIS crisis has prompted the development of an emerging norm of jus ad bellum which contemplates the legality of an armed intervention against perpetrators of terrorism if the Government of the State from which those acts of terror violence are being launched is either unwilling or unable to counteract the atrocities.

In laboring the above principles of law, reference will be made to (a) armed interventions authorized by the Security Council (the Korean War, Operation Desert Storm. Air strikes in Libya, and armed interventions in Mali); instances of humanitarian interventions (NATO air strikes in Serbia, and military interventions in Syria contemplated by France, the United Kingdom, and the United States following the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian Government against rebel groups in that country); and acts of aggression committed by the United States (in Nicaragua in the 1980’s pursuant to the Reagan Doctrine, and the Gulf War of 2003) and by the Russian Federation (in Georgia and in Ukraine).

 A special emphasis of the seminar is the current state of affairs relating to the prosecution of the crime of aggression in the International Criminal Court.

Seminar: Markets for Law

Class Number: 5032; Catalog Number- Law 824, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Ahdieh, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Enrollment: 16

Description: This seminar – which may be of particular appeal to students interested corporate and securities law, environmental law, health law, family law, and other areas characterized by a mix of federal and state law – will explore the unusual dynamic that emerges when multiple jurisdictions compete to produce legal rules. By contrast with our conventional notions of how law is created, the development of law in these settings takes place through a “market” of sorts. As one writer has described it, law is a “product” in these settings: a good to be priced, bought, and sold. Corporate law – given the centrality of jurisdictional competition to understanding and practicing it today – will serve as our case study. Through relevant readings and your papers’ analysis of jurisdictional competition in your own areas of interest, however – from environmental law to family law, health law to banking law, and criminal law to corporate/securities law – we will seek to understand the nature and the wisdom of markets for law more generally.

Seminar: Privacy, Reputation, and Economic Interests in Tort Law

Class Number: 5306; Catalog Number- Law 835

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Partlett, David

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper & Class Presentation

Description: The Seminar will examine two streams of tort law. The first is that encompassed in privacy and defamation. The second are those that concern economic interests. These will include the torts of inducement to breach of contract and misrepresentation both fraudulent and negligent. Both of these are crucial in public policy and in thinking about tort law as it develops in the future. In the first stream free speech is critically implicated. In the second we ask about the extent to which obligations regulate behavior where interests go beyond physical to economic. We will do readings in the first half of the semester and in the second will have class presentations of papers prepared for the seminar. 

2015 Archive 

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
8:00-10:15 a.m.

Business Associations; Freer 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1E

Intellectual Property; Holbrook 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1C

Law & Economics; Shepherd, J 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1D

Property OCF (1L Required Course); Alexander 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Property OAE (1L Required Course); Hughes 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1C

Business Associations; Freer 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1E

Intellectual Property; Holbrook 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1C

Law & Economics; Shepherd, J 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1D

Property OCF (1L Required Course); Alexander 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Property OAE (1L Required Course); Hughes 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1C

Property OAE (1L Required Course); Hughes 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1C

Property OCF (1L Required Course); Alexander 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Property OBD (1L Required Course); Terrell 9:00-10:15 a.m. 

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Administrative Law; Arthur 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1D

American Legal History I; Witte 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Family Law; Broyde 10:30-12:00 a.m. 1E

Products Liability; Zwier 10:30-12:00 a.m. 5A

Constitutional Law OAC (1L Required Course); Shanor 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Criminal Law OEF (1L Required Course); Witte 10:30-12:00 p.m. 1D

Property OBD (1L Required Course); Terrell 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1E

Administrative Law; Arthur 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1D

American Legal History I; Witte 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Family Law; Broyde 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

Products Liability; Zwier 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Constitutional Law OAC (1L Required Course); Shanor 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Criminal Law OEF (1L Required Course); Witte 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1D

Property OBD (1L Required Course); Terrell 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1E

Constitutional Law OBE (1L Required Course); Seaman 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1D

Constitutional Law OAC (1L Required Course); Shanor 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Constitutional Law ODF (1L Required Course); Volokh 10:30-12:00 p.m. 5F

12:15-1:45 p.m.Community Activities

Constitutional Law ODF; Volokh 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5F

Criminal Law OBC; Cloud 12:15-1:45 1C

Community Activities

Constitutional Law ODF; Volokh 12:15-1:45 p.m.

Criminal Law OBC; Cloud 12:15-1:45

LWRAP; Carroll 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

LWRAP; Schwartz 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1C

LWRAP; Thornton 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

2:00-4:00 p.m.

LWRAP; Carroll 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5B

LWRAP; Daspit 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1B

LWRAP; Kirk 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5C

LWRAP; Mathews 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

LWRAP; Romig 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5F

LWRAP; Schwartz 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Constitutional Law OBE (1L Required Course); Seaman 2:15-3:45 p.m. 1D

Criminal Law OAD (1L Required Course); Duncan 2:15-3:45 p.m. 1E

LWRAP; Daspit 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1B

LWRAP; Kirk 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5C

LWRAP; Mathews 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

LWRAP; Romig 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5F

LWRAP; Thornton 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5B

Constitutional Law OBE (1L Required Course); Seaman 2:15-3:45 p.m. 1D

Criminal Law OAD (1L Required Course); Duncan 2:15-3:45 p.m. 1E

4:15-8:00 p.m.

Business Associations; Kang 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1C

Evidence; Goldfeder 4:15-6:00 p.m. 1E

International Law; An-Na'im 4:15-5:45 p.m. 5F

Business Associations; Kang 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1C

Evidence; Goldfeder 4:15-6:00 p.m. 1E

International Law; An-Na'im 4:15-5:45 p.m. 5F

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
8:30-10:30 a.m.

Business Associations; Freer 8:30-10:15 a.m. 1E

Constitutional Law: Religion & State; Goldfeder 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5C

Intellectual Property; Holbrook 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1C

Law & Economics; Shepherd J, 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1D

Art Law; Moore 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1B

Doing Deals: Accounting in Action; MacKay 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5E

Externships: Civil Litigation; Shalf 8:30-9:30 a.m. 5A

Federal Income Tax: Individuals; Brown 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5B

Remedies; Partlett 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1E

Wealth Transfer Tax; Pennell 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5D

Business Associations; Freer 8:30-10:15 a.m. 1E

Constitutional Law: Religion & State; Goldfeder 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Avery 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1B

Intellectual Property; Holbrook 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1C

Law & Economics; Shepherd J, 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1D

Externships: Small Firm; Shalf 8:30-9:30 a.m. 5A

Federal Income Tax: Individuals; Brown 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5B

Remedies; Partlett 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1E

Wealth Transfer Tax; Pennell 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5D


Externships: Judicial; Hirokawa 8:30-9:30 a.m. 5A

Barton Child Law & Policy Clinic; Carter 8:30-10:30 a.m. 1B

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Administrative Law; Arthur 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1D

American Legal History I; Witte 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Analytical Methods/Lawyers; Shepherd J 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Courtroom Persuasion Drama I; Metzger 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1F

Family Law I; Broyde 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

IP Contracting; Vertinsky 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5E

National Security Law; Blank 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

Products Liability; Zwier 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Secured Transactions; Pardo 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Advanced Legal Writing: Blogging & Social Media; Romig / Chapman 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1F

Antitrust; Arthur 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication; Levine 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

European Union Law; Mickevicius 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5D

Federal Income Tax: Corporations; Fowler 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Sports and Marketing; Altman-Linsky 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 1B

Administrative Law; Arthur 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1D

American Legal History I; Witte 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Analytical Methods/Lawyers; Shepherd J 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Family Law I; Broyde 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

IP Contracting; Vertinsky 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5E

National Security Law; Blank 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

Products Liability; Zwier 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Secured Transactions; Pardo 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Advanced Legal Writing: Blogging & Social Media; Romig / Chapman 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1F

Antitrust; Arthur 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication; Levine 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

European Union Law; Mickevicius 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5D

12:15-1:45 p.m.Community Activities Hour

Advanced Legal Writing: Moving from Classroom to Workplace; Mathews 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5A

Advanced Criminal Trial Practice; McCoyd 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

Business & Tax Legal Research; (Accelerated 1/5-2/16) Sneed 12:00-2:00 p.m. 5D

Constitutional Rights / Controversy; Perry 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

Health Law; Bergeson 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5E

Jewish Law; Broyde 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1D

Legal Profession; Elliott 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1E

SEM: Comp Bill of Rights; Van der Vyver 12:00-2:00 p.m. 5K

Community Activities Hour

Advanced Legal Writing: Moving from Classroom to Workplace; Mathews 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5A

Advanced Legal Writing: Pretrial Briefs; Carroll / Schwartz 12:00-2:00 p.m. 1B

Advanced Criminal Trial Practice; McCoyd 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

Advanced Legal Research; (Accelerated 1/5-2/16) Reid 12:00-2:00 p.m. 1F

Constitutional Rights / Controversy; Perry 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

Health Law; Bergeson 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5E

Jewish Law; Broyde 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1D

Legal Profession; Elliott 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1E

Technology in Legal Practice; (Accelerated 2/23-4/13) Glon 12:00-2:00 p.m. 5D

 


ETT-Trial Techniques

January 9: Case Analysis

January 23: Direct and Cross

January 30: Exhibits

February 6: Jury Selection

February 13: Client Counseling and Case Presentation

February 20: Expert Witnesses (optional workshop)

May Program: May 2-8, 2015

2:00-4:00 p.m.

Alternate Dispute Resolution; Armstrong 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5D

Child Welfare Law & Policy; Murry 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

Comparative Constitutional Law; Klymovich 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1A

Complex Litigation; Freer 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1E

Courtroom Persuasion Drama I; Metzger 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1F

International Human Rights; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5E

SEM: Advanced International Negotiations; Zwier / Crick 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5K

SEM: Markets for Law; Ahdieh 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5G

American Legal Writing (LLM); Daspit 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1F

Capital Defender Workshop; Moore 3:30-5:30 p.m. (Not on campus)

Comparative Law; Ludsin 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1B

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting (MCL Only); Carghill 2:00-5:00 p.m. 5E

Employment Discrimination; Shanor 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5B

Federal Courts; Nash 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5F

International Business Transactions; Dean 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1C

International Humanitarian Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

SEM: Animal Law; Satz 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5D

SEM: Law & Vulnerability; Fineman 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

Alternate Dispute Resolution; Armstrong 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5D

Comparative Constitutional Law; Klymovich 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1A

Complex Litigation; Freer 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1E

Doing Deals: Commercial Real Estate; Elliott 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

Estate Planning; Pennell 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1C

International Humanitarian Law Clinic; Blank 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

International Human Rights; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5E

SEM: Law & Literature; Duncan 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5K

Access to Justice; Costa 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1F

American Legal Writing (LLM): Daspit 2:00-3:30 p.m 1F

Colloquium Series Workshop; Levine 2:00-3:00 p.m. 5E

Comparative Law; Ludsin 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1B

Employment Discrimination; Shanor 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5B

Federal Courts; Nash 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5F

International Business Transactions; Dean 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1C

International Humanitarian Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

SEM: Disability Law; Satz 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5D

SEM: Family Law, Partner to Parent; Fineman 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

 
4:00-9:15 p.m.

AdvancedEvidence; McCoyd 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1B

Advanced Pre-Trial Litigation; Elmore 5:15-8:15 p.m. 1F

Alternate Dispute Resolution; Allgood 4:15-5:45 p.m. 5A

Biography, Autobiography & Scandal; Felman 4:00-7:00 p.m. 5D

Business Associations; Kang 4:00-5:30 p.m. 1C

Copyright Law; Beck 4:00-5:30 p.m. 5E

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Parkerson 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; Alperin, Connell 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; Hillman, Goodmark 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Doing Deals: Corporate Practice; Rector 6:15-9:15 p.m. 5A

Education Law & Policy; Waldman 4:15-6:15 p.m. NDB 155

Energy Law; Crofton 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5B

Evidence; Goldfeder 4:15-6:00 p.m. 1E

Federal Prosecution Practice; Grimberg 6:15-9:15 p.m. 5E

International IP Law; Holz 6:30-8:00 p.m. 1D

International Law; An-Na'im 4:15-5:45 p.m. 5F

Negotiations; Athans 6:15-8:15 p.m. 1B

Advanced Civil Trial Practice: Medical Malpractice; Graves 6:15-8:15 p.m. 1F

Canon Law; Domingo 4:15-6:15 p.m. G114

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Saudek 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Tyde 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1A

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; Lewinson, Klemperer 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; McMorries, Duma 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5D

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; Notte, Bondurant 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Mergers and Acquisitions; Ernst, Hilton 5:00-8:00 p.m. 5K

Employment Discrimination Lab; King / Shultz 6:15-7:30 p.m. 1E

Entertainment Law; Sanders 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1E

Externships: Advanced Amidon / Perry 6:15 - 7:15 p.m 5A 

Externships: Government Counsel; Amidon / Perry 5:00-6:00 p.m. 5A

Externships: Public Interest Segal / Cadenhead 5:00-6:00 p.m. 5E

Fundamentals of Innovation II; Rector 4:30-7:30 p.m. 5B

Introduction to the American Legal System (JM Only); Mathews 6:30-8:30 p.m. 1B

Law in Public Health; Kocher 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1B

Negotiations; Eldridge 5:30-7:30 p.m. NDB 155

Privacy Law; Cloud 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1C

Securities: Brokers / Dealers; Terry 6:15-7:45 p.m. 5E

Tax Controversies; Loechel 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1D

Advanced Evidence; McCoyd 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1B

Alternate Dispute Resolution; Allgood 4:15-5:45 p.m. 5A

Asylum Law; Kuck 5:00-8:00 p.m. 5C

Business & Strategic Lawyering; Aronson 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1D

Business Associations; Kang 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1C

Civil Trial Practice: Family Law; Wellon 6:15-9:15 p.m. 1F

Copyright Law; Beck 4:00-5:30 p.m. 5E

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Payne 4:15-7:15 p.m. G114

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; Hill, Lewis 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Venture Capital; Pannell, Berson 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Evidence; Goldfeder 4:15-6:00 p.m. 1E

Externships: Criminal Defense; Kleinrock 6:15-7:15 p.m. 5D

Federal Income Tax: Partnership; Beaudrot 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5B

Intellectual Property Litigation; North 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1F

International IP Law; Holz 6:30-8:00 p.m. 5E

International Law; An-Na'im 4:15-5:45 p.m. 5F

Alternate Dispute Resolution (JM); Allgood 5:00-6:15 p.m. 1F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Segal 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Doing Deals: Negotiated Corporate Transactions; Scott 4:05-6:30 p.m. 1B

Entertainment Law; Sanders 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1E

Externships: Legislative / Policy; George 5:00-6:00 p.m. 5G

Externships: Prosecution; Brickman 5:00-6:00 p.m. 5B

Externships: Corporate Counsel; Cavitt 6:15-7:15 p.m. 5F

Federal Appellate Practice; Marcovitch 5:00-7:00 p.m. 5C

Legal Analysis & Writing for Non-Lawyers; (Accelerated) Kirk 6:30-8:30 p.m. 5D

Privacy Law; Cloud 4:15-5:45 p.m. 1C

Reg. Healthcare Providers; Miller 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1D

Securities: Brokers / Dealers; Terry 6:15-7:45 p.m. 5E

SEM: Money in Politics; Kang 4:00-6:00 p.m. 5A

 

Date9:00 a.m. Exams2:00 p.m. Exams
Wednesday, 4/22/2015
  • Analytical Methods/Laywers-Shepherd, J: 5F
  • Secured Transaction-Pardo: 1C
  • Property-Alexander: 5E + 5F
  • Property-Hughes: 1E 
  • Property-Terrell: 1B + 1C
Thursday, 4/23/2015
  • Art Law-Moore: 1B 
  • Complex Litigation-Freer: 1E
  • Federal Income Tax, Corp-Fowler: 5F
  • Remedies-Partlett: 5E 
  • Business & Strategic Lawyering-Aronson: 5C
  • Entertainment Law-Sanders: 5E
  • International Human Rights-Van der Vyver: 5B
  • Tax Controversies-Loechel: 5D
Friday, 4/24/2015
  • Antitrust-Arthur: 5F
  • Criminal Procedure, Adjudication-Levine: 5C 
  • Copyright Law-Beck: 5E
  • Federal Income Tax, Partnership-Beaudrot: 5B
  • National Security Law-Blank: 1B
  • Criminal Law-Duncan: 1D + 1E
  • Criminal Law-Cloud: 5E + 5F 
  • Criminal Law-Witte: 1B + 1C
Saturday, 4/25/2015
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Sunday, 4/26/2015
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Monday, 4/27/2015
  • Federal Courts-Nash: 5B
  • International Humanitarian Law-Van der Vyver: 5C
  • Legal Profession-Elliott: 1B + 1C
  • Securities, Brokers/Dealers-Terry: 5A
  • Constitutional Law-Seaman: 1C + 1D
  • Constitutional Law-Shanor: 1E + 1F 
  • Constitutional Law-Volokh: 5B + 5C + 5D
Tuesday, 4/28/2015
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY
Wednesday, 4/29/2015
  • Business Associations-Freer: 1D + 1E
  • Comparative Constitutional Law-Klymovych: 5K
  • Evidence-Goldfeder: 1A + 1B + 1C
  • Federal Income Tax, Individual-Brown: 5F
  • Intro Law & Economics-Shepherd, J: 5B + 5C
  • Administrative Law-Arthur: 5B
  • Family Law-Broyde: 1B + 1C
  • International IP Law-Holz: 1D
  • Products Liability-Zwier: 5C
  • Regulation, Healthcare Providers-Miller: 5D
Thursday, 4/30/2015
  • Business Associations-Kang: 1E
  • Energy Law-Crofton: 5C
  • Intellectual Property-Holbrook: 1B + 1C
  • International Law-An-Na'im: 5E 
  • Con Law Religion & State-Goldfeder: 5E
  • Employment Discrimination-Shanor: 5F
  • European Union Law-Michevicus: 5K
  • Health Law-Bergeson: 5B
Friday, 5/01/2015
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY

The following courses were offered in Spring 2015.

Access to Justice Workshop: Getting Into the Courtroom

Law 679, 02A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Costa

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Classroom exercises, court performance, periodic reaction papers

Description: Access to Justice provides second and third year law students the unique opportunity to see how justice is actually administered in criminal cases in actual Georgia Courts and to develop their courtroom oral advocacy skills in a real-world setting. We will examine, through readings and classroom discussion, the ways in which poor and underserved populations access justice within the framework of the traditional criminal justice system, and the increasing role of accountability courts for defendants suffering with drug, alcohol or mental health afflictions

But this class extends far beyond the conventional classroom in three significant ways. First, students will take multiple off-campus trips, including touring the local jail facility and attending actual court sessions to observe criminal case proceedings. Second, students will receive real recent criminal case warrants and police reports and will conduct interviews with actual defendants (either in or out of custody) and participate in mock classroom hearings on these cases. Lastly, where possible, students will represent their clients in actual court proceedings (bond hearings, preliminary hearings, and even possibly motions and trials).

Students should plan to be in court one weekday morning every other week throughout the semester, though multiple days will be available each week to accommodate individual student schedules. Students will be graded primarily on their performance in both classroom and courtroom hearings and their participation in classroom discussion, and secondarily on periodic papers analyzing their experiences.

Administrative Law

Law 701, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Arthur

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Most areas of contemporary legal practice require lawyers to work with administrative agencies and a large body of law concerning such agencies. This course is a study of how agencies are empowered, the procedures and modes through Description: Most areas of contemporary legal practice require lawyers to work with administrative agencies and a large body of law concerning such agencies. This course is a study of how agencies are empowered, the procedures and modes through which agencies carry out their tasks, and legal constraints on these agencies. Topics include constitutional limits on Congress' power to delegate legislative and judicial power to agencies; procedures imposed upon agency adjudication and lawmaking by the Constitution, the Administrative Procedure Act, and other statutes; the scope of judicial review of agency decisions, including the methods by which courts restrict and control agency discretion, and the limitations on the availability of federal judicial review of federal agency actions. In addition, the course will explore several recent "regulatory reform" initiatives.

Advanced Civil Trial Practice: Medical Malpractice

Law 957, 06A

COURSE NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN CIVIL TRIAL PRACTICE.

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Graves

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Course Work, Pretrial Conference and Trial

Description: The course is designed around an advanced litigation problem involving a heart transplant operation that went awry. The course is taught by experienced lawyers, judges, and doctors, includes demonstrations and trial discussions by other well-known lawyers in the field, and a hands-on visit to an operating room in a local hospital with a surgeon and nurse. Classes are generally in the NITA format supplemented by lectures and demonstrations about trial issues and medical/legal procedures. The students actually try the case at the end of the semester in front of a jury and before active trial judges in one of the local Superior Courts.

Advanced Criminal Trial Practice

Law 852, 02A

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. McCoyd

Prerequisite: Evidence and Trial Technique

Grading Criteria: Critiqued classroom exercises and a final simulated trial

Enrollment: 20

Description: This workshop will provide build on the trial skills taught in the Kessler Eidson Trial Techniques Program, this course focuses on advanced techniques for opening statements, direct examinations, cross-examinations, and closing arguments in a complex litigation case. The course will draw on both criminal case files to provide a wide range of experience and development for the students. This will be accomplished by utilizing a combination of lectures, simulated courtroom exercises, detailed critiques, and specific recommendations for improvement.

Addressing issues and strategies relevant to the aspiring trial advocate who is dedicated to honing his or her trial skills, the course presentations inspire and educate in critical areas including: persuasion, trial strategy, effective use of trial exhibits, demonstrative evidence and courtroom technology, with attention to the inherent ethical concerns in each area. The course will feature a combination of these presentations, workshop sessions, and a final simulated trial. Workshops will include instruction on developing persuasive case theories, compelling trial themes and effective case characterizations and incorporating these methodologies into direct and cross-examination, objections, opening statements and closing arguments.

Students will learn how to construct and deliver effective opening statements, direct and cross-examinations, and closing arguments, all while consistently incorporating, via lecture and class participation and experience, the key concepts needed to prevail when actually trying cases. Faculty critiques will cover the concepts specific to the exercise the student performed (opening, direct, cross, or closing) and address tactical principles such as utilization of theory and theme, as well as common communication issues including use of voice and movement as tools of effective advocacy.

The course is designed for law students who have at the minimum taken a basic course in evidence, with those who have taken a trial advocacy course and/or have a serious interest in trial practice preferred.

Law 958, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Wellon

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Course Work, Pretrial Conference and Trial 

Description: Designed to build on the litigation skills introduced in last year’s Trial Techniques Program, this course will enhance students’ trial proficiency by emphasizing lecture, demonstrations, as well as regular classroom participation through the NITA-inspired learn-by-doing approach. Students will receive guidance from a highly experienced panel of instructors comprised of well-respected judges and trial lawyers. Courtroom technology and visual aids will also be presented by providers of litigation support. The case file is built around a divorce trial, with issues of custody, alimony and support, division of property, and an interesting twist on adultery and its impact. There are no family law pre-requisites for this course, as the primary focus will be developing and refining trial skills which will translate into any litigation. Some emphasis will be placed on the substantive law of domestic relations to establish the issues to be tried, but the real goal of the course is to further enhance the development of true trial lawyers. Other components of the course will feature jury selection by a nationally known jury consultant, and pretrial conferences in anticipation of preparing for trial. Throughout the course, knowledge of evidence and its proper application will be emphasized, along with effective and practical techniques of delivery and examination. At the conclusion of the semester, a full trial will be conducted by student trial teams to a live jury in a real courtroom setting at the DeKalb County Courthouse with actual trial judges presiding. This is an essential course for students interested in honing and further enhancing their abilities in a courtroom, and for others simply interested in expanding their knowledge and skills in the burgeoning area of family law. The course has been expanded to three hours in recognition of the value of the course and the time and specialized attention required to prepare law students to move immediately into trial work upon graduation.

Advanced Evidence

Law 632A, 04A

Credit: 3 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. McCoyd

Prerequisite: Evidence

Grading Criteria: Critiqued classroom exercises and a written final exam

Enrollment: 20

Description: The objective of this course is to explore and develop selected complex evidentiary issues that are not covered by the basic Evidence course. The objective will be accomplished through the use of both lecture and simulations that present these issues in the context of complex civil and criminal litigation scenarios. While learning to analyze sophisticated evidentiary issues, students will also be able to expand the basic trial skills they acquired in Trial Advocacy. The faculty will lead participants through the quagmire of the Federal Rules of Evidence. This course offers participants the necessary skills to work through evidentiary issues with greater accuracy and confidence; ensure baseline relevancy issues are met, to affirm that probative value outweighs unfair prejudice; analyze quickly whether character evidence, including prior bad acts, is admissible; describe when habit and custom evidence may be admitted; utilize appropriate impeachment objections after analyzing the rules regarding bias, capacity and prior inconsistent statements; and, outline an analytical scheme for hearsay objections and the exceptions.

The course is designed for law students who have at the minimum taken a basic course in evidence.

Advanced Legal Research

Law 657, 12A

Accelerated Class: January 5, 2015 – February 16, 2015

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Professor Richelle Reid

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Enrollment: 20

Description: An examination of the legal research methods and sources beyond the basics taught during the first year of law school. Through lectures and practical application with in-class exercises and a final research project, students will become familiar with topics such as advanced research techniques, case, statute & regulatory research, aids for the practitioner and legislative history research.

This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the first seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

Advanced Legal Writing: Blogging and Social Media

Law 851, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Romig & Prof. Chapman

Prerequisite: LWRAP I

Grading Criteria: Students will write approximately eight blog posts of 600-800 words each, and will comment on other students’ work posted on the course blog. Satisfactory peer review of selected assignments and the final project will also be required. This work is ungraded but required for passing the course, and will form the basis for the final capstone blog project.

The final grade will be calculated as follows: 10 percent of the grade will be based on a short small-group presentation on an assigned topic about blogging (examples: strong lead paragraphs, use of headings, humor, links and citations).

The other 90 percent will be based on the capstone blog project, in which students will create blogs representing themselves and their law-related interests. Each student will create his or her own blog that includes at least five posts revised from the student’s earlier posts in the course, and two additional posts that the student creates. These posts should represent the student’s legal research and analytical abilities, reader-focused organization and reader-friendly concise writing, unique yet still professional voice, and writing proficiency with grammar and punctuation. The goal is to create a blog that the student can use after the class to explore his or her law-related interests and represent those interests to potential employers. The student will have the ability to limit blog access to class members only. Prior technical knowledge of blogging software is not required – students will learn to use WordPress, a leading blogging platform.

Description: This course is an experiential course that will teach skills that are crucial for every young litigator or any lawyer who might end up in court. We will discuss many of the typical pre-trial motions filed when defending a civil case and will address litigation strategy. Specifically, the class will work through a medical malpractice case, and the students will write three briefs: (1) a brief in support of a motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim; (2) a brief in response to a motion to compel discovery; and (3) a brief in support of a motion for summary judgment. We anticipate the students will also do an oral argument on the motion for summary judgment. The assignments will be “closed universe” assignments, meaning that the students will not need to do independent research. Out of class reading, other than authorities for the briefs, will be limited; the students will learn to write briefs by writing them. The students will not take a separate final exam. The only prerequisites for this course are those in the first year curriculum. Students do not need to take Pre-Trial Litigation before taking this class.

Advanced Pretrial Litigation

Law 755A, 05A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elmore

Description: TBA

Advanced Topic in Legal Writing: Moving from the Classroom to the Workplace

Law 893, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Mathews

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take Home Exam

Description: This course seeks to develop further two primary skill sets introduced in the first-year LWRAP course: (1) understanding principles of legal information literacy, and (2) recognizing and responding to audience characteristics. The course will help students learn how to apply these skills in the legal workplace by employing an innovative approach of focusing solely on assignments that are short in length or duration or both. These kinds of rapid, succinct analyses are increasingly the bread and butter of real-world legal practice.

About half of the weekly writing assignments in the course will center on more skillful and informed application of principles of legal information literacy (i.e., the set of skills needed to locate, evaluate, and effectively utilize legal authorities). These assignments will focus on issues such as efficiently using a wide variety of free and fee-based on-line legal research tools; tackling unusual legal issues that pose particular research challenges; and effectively screening and organizing relevant authorities. The remaining assignments will focus on shaping documents to respond to and take advantage of particular audience characteristics, whether the demands of a busy judge, the urgency of an assigning attorney, or the sensitivity of a client. These assignments may take the form of preparing a document to be read by two audiences with different interests; producing an overview report that can be absorbed quickly by a busy reader; or an assignment requiring an oral report rather than a written document.

The course will build upon but move beyond the instructional techniques used in the first-year LWRAP course by shifting away from a process-based model (in which students work through a series of incremental assignments as part of the process of drafting, reconsidering, and revising a complete analytical document over a period of weeks). Instead, the course will use focused, tailored assignments, to be submitted under tight deadlines. Students will receive detailed feedback on each assignment, but that feedback will be oriented toward getting students to identify and address practice-related issues in their writing, rather than coaching students through a progressive revision process.

Advanced Topic in Legal Writing: Pretrial Briefs

Law 853, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Carroll & Prof. Schwartz

Prerequisite: None

Description: This course is an experiential course that will teach skills that are crucial for every young litigator or any lawyer who might end up in court. We will discuss many of the typical pre-trial motions filed when defending a civil case and will address litigation strategy. Specifically, the class will work through a medical malpractice case, and the students will write three briefs: (1) a brief in support of a motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim; (2) a brief in response to a motion to compel discovery; and (3) a brief in support of a motion for summary judgment. We anticipate the students will also do an oral argument on the motion for summary judgment. The assignments will be “closed universe” assignments, meaning that the students will not need to do independent research. Out of class reading, other than authorities for the briefs, will be limited; the students will learn to write briefs by writing them. The students will not take a separate final exam. The only prerequisites for this course are those in the first year curriculum. Students do not need to take Pre-Trial Litigation before taking this class.

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Law 605, 04A (Allgood) 

Law 605, 02A (Armstrong)

COURSES NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN BUSINESS SCHOOL OR LAW SCHOOL NEGOTIATIONS. THIS COURSE WILL BE OFFERED IN THE FALL SEMESTER.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Allgood/Prof. Armstrong

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria:

  • Team Role Plays and Final Objective Exam (Allgood)
  • Take Home (Armstrong)

Enrollment: 20

Description: This course will explore Alternative Dispute Resolution [ADR] with an emphasis on negotiation, mediation and arbitration processes. Course objectives include an overview of these processes as a complement to litigation as well as study of and training in the skill sets used in each of the ADR processes by advocates as well as neutrals.

American Legal History I

Law 655, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Witte

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take Home Exam

Description: This course treats the history of American public, private and penal law from its colonial beginnings through the American Civil War and Reconstruction.

The main aim of this course is to understand the evolution of American law in intellectual, political, social, and economic context. We shall analyze the emerging American legal understandings of authority and power, rights and liberties, individuals and associations. We shall witness the gradual and painful efforts, only partly successful in this period, to include slaves and servants, women and children, natives and immigrants within the ambit of legal protection. And we shall focus on the transformation of constitutional law, criminal law, and private laws of marriage, property, contract, and commerce in the first century after the American Revolution. Much of what we now take for granted in our American legal system today, we shall see, was forged in the remarkable century of legal development between the Revolution and the Civil War.

Part I of this course focuses on the colonial legal system, particularly in Massachusetts and Virginia, viewed against the prevailing law of England and the Continent. Part II deals with the remarkable development of American constitutionalism in the young American nation, at both the state and federal levels. Part III analyzes the transformation of American private law and criminal law in the first half of the nineteenth century. Part IV traces the painful struggle over slavery and abolition, culminating the American Civil War and passage of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Classes will consist of lecture and discussion. There will be a take home examination, handed out the last day of the semester, with a 3000 word answer due the last day of the law school examination period.

Readings will consist of a blend of excerpted primary and secondary sources available in PDF format and on the electronic blackboard maintained for this course.

Am Legal Writing, Analysis & Research

Law 560, LLM

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Daspit

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: An introduction to law and sources of law, legal bibliography and research techniques and strategies, the analysis of problems in legal terms, the writing of an office memorandum of law.

Analytical Methods of Lawyers

Law 734, 11A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shepherd-Bailey

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Enrollment: 80

Description: This course explores the application to the practice of law of analytical methods of the social sciences and business profession. It will introduce essential concepts from economics, accounting, finance, statistics, and game theory to prepare students for legal practice in the modern world. These tools can be tremendously important and useful; not knowing something about them can be a serious detriment to the effective practice of law. Always, our focus will be on the application of analytical methods to real legal problems, such as the appropriate measure of damages or when to settle a case -- not becoming adept at complicated calculations. Our primary goal: to recognize when an analytical method would be useful in a legal situation and to develop a rough idea of how to use that method. Students are not expected to have any prior training or experience.

Antitrust

Law 702, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Arthur

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Federal regulation of competitive practices under the Sherman, Clayton, and Federal Trade Commission Acts. The course covers such antitrust problems as joint activities by direct competitors, including cartel price fixing, market division and boycott arrangements and productive joint ventures; monopolization by single firms; restraints imposed by manufacturers on their distributors; and mergers.

Art Law

Law 625, 08A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Moore

Prerequisite: None

Description: This class will explore and analyze the intersection of law with art and culture. Topics will include censorship, copyright and the Visual Artist Rights Act, contracts, consignment of art acts such as the Georgia Consignment of Art Act, limited edition laws as well as United States, European Union, and international law as they relate to the illicit trade in antiquities, Nazi Era plunder, other art crimes, in addition to other aspects of the law pertaining to art dealers, auction houses, artist's rights, and museums. Additional subjects will include cultural heritage and indigenous cultural issues. Course materials will include readings from Art Law, Cases and Materials (DuBoff, Burr and Murray, 2004). Links to selected legislation, international conventions, agreements, and other resources are provided below. Some of these materials will be optional.

Asylum Law

Law 691, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kuck

Description: TBA

Biography, Autobiography, and Scandal: Literature as Testimony and as Courtroom Drama

Law 618, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Felman

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Regular attendance; two short papers distributed in the course of the semester; brief oral presentations; weekly one-page reading reports, and active (annotated) preparation of texts for class discussion; ongoing participation.

Enrollment: 10

Description: History has put on trial a series of outstanding thinkers. At the dawn of philosophy, Socrates drinks the cup of poison to which he is condemned by the Athenians, charged with atheism and corruption of the youth. Centuries later, in modernity, a similarly influential teacher, Oscar Wilde, is condemned by the English for his homosexuality, as well as for his provocative artistic views. In France, Flaubert and Baudelaire are both indicted as criminals for their literary works; Emile Zola is condemned for defending a Jew against the state, which has (wrongly) convicted him. Different forms of censorship are instigated by religious institutions, as well as by psychoanalytic ones. The French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan – who practices and teaches new techniques—is expelled from the International Psychoanalytical Association, and perceives his expulsion as a religious “excommunication” (Luther, Spinoza). Through the examination of a series of historical and literary trials, this course will ask: Why are literary writers, philosophers and creative thinkers, repetitively put on trial, and how do in turn do they put society on trial? Can these trials be viewed as autobiographies of sorts, or as biographies of scandal? What is the role of literature as a political actor in the struggles over ethics and the struggles over meaning? And finally: how does literature become the writing of a destiny, or what can be called “Life-Writing”?

Selected Authors for Spring 2015: Plato (Apology; Crito; Philosophy on trial; Plato’s experience of his mentor’s execution); Oscar Wilde (Sexuality, art, and biography on trial: Wilde’s writings--novel, plays, autobiography, ballad; and Wilde’s biography – in literary memoirs narrated by his friend and colleague, the French writer André Gide); Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary, novel on trial); Charles Baudelaire (Flowers of Evil, poetry on trial: exemplary poems studied); Herman Melville (Billy Budd, one of the richest literary illustrations of “Law in Literature”: a story of Innocence on trial).

Business and Strategic Lawyering

Law 630, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Aronson

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Business and Strategic Lawyering is the big picture of law. It is the development and understanding of legal, business, political social and other considerations with a goal to implementing strategic legal, business and other actions to obtain the best results. The constantly changing fields of science, technology and globalization and their legal, business, political and social consequences make the strategic merging of proactive business strategies and legal considerations necessary for optimizing results. Both lawyers and business executives need to act proactively to protect clients and shareholder interests through effective strategic legal and business risk management structures and processes within the larger strategic business context. The course will include prominent guest lecturers from the legal and business communities.

This course will also consider and evaluate law firm management procedures and techniques to maximize on revenues as well as more effectively serving business clients. In the innovative driven technological economy we are living today, strategic lawyering has become an imperative for both lawyers and business executives.

Business & Tax Legal Research

Law 762, 12A

ACCELERATED CLASS: January 5, 2015 – February 16, 2015

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Sneed

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Enrollment: 20

Description: The purpose of Business and Tax Legal Research is to provide students with an introduction to business and tax related materials and advanced training on the finding and utilization of these materials for legal research purposes. Topics covered will include business forms, business filings and SEC research, and primary and secondary sources for tax issues.

This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the first seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

Business Associations
  • Law 500, 08A (Freer): Credit 4 hours
  • Law 500, 04A (Kang): Credit 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Freer (08A); Prof. Kang (04A)

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course surveys formation, organization, financing, management, and dissolution of sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, limited partnerships, and limited liability companies. While covering fundamental rights and responsibilities of owners, managers, and other stakeholders. The course also considers the special needs of closely held enterprises, basic issues in corporate finance, and the impact of federal and state laws and regulations governing the formation, management, financing, and dissolution of business enterprises. This course includes consideration of major federal securities laws governing insider trading and other fraudulent practices under Rule 10b-5 and section 16(b).

Canon Law

Law 623, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Domingo

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-Home Exam

Description: Canon Law, the law of the Catholic Church, stands at the origin of the Western Legal Tradition and is one of the chief sources of legal concepts and principles we take for granted today. This course will explore the theological and historical background of Canon Law, as well as contemporary Canon Law practice and principles set out in 1983 Code of Canon Law and post-1983 legislation. The course will cover such topics as marriage and family life; clerical conduct and misconduct; church governance at the universal, intermediary, and local levels; the interwoven roles of the papacy, bishops, synod of bishops, college of cardinals, and Roman Curia; the division of church power among provinces and regions, metropolitans, particular councils, and local parishes; and some controverted questions concerning the rights and obligations of ordained diocesan clerics. The topics and themes of the course will be adjusted to meet the needs and interests of students. The readings will include primary and secondary sources.

Capital Defender Workshop

Law 658, 03A

SELECTION: INTERESTED STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT A LETTER OF INTEREST & RESUME TO JOSH MOORE, OFFICE OF THE GEORGIA CAPITAL DEFENDER (PHONE: 404.736.5151; FAX: 404.739.5155)

Credit: 3 Hours (pass/fail)

Instructor(s): Prof. Moore

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation

Description: This is a three hour clinical course taught in partnership with the Office of the Georgia Capital Defender, the new state agency responsible for representing all indigent defendants statewide in capital cases at trial and on direct appeal. Second and third year law students from Emory, Georgia State, UGA, and Mercer will assist Capital Defender attorneys in all aspects of preparing their clients’ cases for trial. Students will become involved in fact investigations, witness interviewing, legal research and drafting, and general preparations for trials and sentencing hearings. The great opportunity students have in this clinic—as opposed to clinics that focus on the appeal and post-conviction stages—is to be involved in the effort to save lives on the front end, on “making the case for life.” That means students will focus at least as much on mitigation, fact investigation, and interpersonal skills as on death penalty law and advocacy skills.

The course component of this clinic will meet for 2 hours each week at the offices of the Capital Defender in downtown Atlanta. In addition to attending class, students will work on client matters for 10 hours each week. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis only, and students who express willingness to commit for 2 semesters will be given preference at the Pre-selection stage. Please indicate on your application whether you have taken any criminal procedure course(s) or the capital punishment course.

Child Welfare Law and Policy

Law 635, 02A

THIS COURSE QUALIFIES AS A PRE-REQUISITE OR CO-REQUISITE FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE BARTON PUBLIC POLICY OR LEGISLATIVE CLINIC.

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Murry

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Grading Criteria: Grades will be based upon advocacy exercises with written and in-class simulation components, a short reaction paper, and participation.

Description: This course will explore the various factors that shape policies affecting abused and neglected children, including: the requirements of federal laws and regulations; the perspective of different disciplines working on these issues; public perceptions; and media coverage. The course will cover the role of federal, state, and local agencies and non-governmental organizations in addressing the needs of abused and neglected children and their families. Students will learn to identify and use resources from other disciplines to supplement their legal skills and will learn to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of legal, legislative, and administrative policy strategies as a response to child abuse and neglect.

Colloquium Series Workshop

Law 860A, 12A

Credit: 2 Hours

Selection: Pre-selection

Instructor(s): Prof. Levine, Kay

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class Work

Enrollment: 6

Description: Would you like a close-up look at the world of legal scholarship and the exchange of scholarly ideas? Are you seeking more engagement with the Emory Law faculty outside of the traditional classroom setting? Do you want to become a stronger writer? Have you ever thought you might want to become a law professor? If so, consider applying to the Colloquium Series Workshop (CSW).

Components: Students who participate in this two unit workshop attend two meetings each week: the weekly faculty colloquium, which meets on Wednesdays over the lunch hour (and includes lunch) and a one-hour class session run by Professor Kay Levine, on Thursday afternoons. During each of these one hour sessions, students discuss the colloquium work as a piece of scholarship (and as piece of persuasive writing), critique the author's presentation, and review materials relating to the production of scholarship and the legal academic job market. In advance of the weekly meeting, students write short reaction papers to each colloquium piece. The CSW will be graded on a pass/fail basis, but with high attendance and participation standards set for what constitutes a passing grade.

Enrollment: Students enroll in the CSW in accordance with the same procedures used for seminars (advance application during the Pre-selection process). However, enrollment is limited to six students each semester, instead of the usual 15. On the Pre-selection form please indicate the basis of your interest in the CSW, and note whether you will be producing a journal comment or other independent scholarly paper during the spring semester.

Comparative Law

Law 724, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ludsin

Prerequisite: None

Description: What do (1) corporate counsel advising Walmart on opening stores in India; (2) US government officials helping to write the Iraqi constitution; and (3) Human Rights Watch workers fighting for gender equality in Afghanistan have in common? Each must know the law of the foreign jurisdiction and how it compares either to their own law or to some “ideal.” With so much cross-border activity, even purely “domestic” lawyers now must employ comparative law. This course focuses on the process of comparing law to prepare students to employ it in their own legal practice. It will use examples of substantive legal issues from across the globe to teach students how to compare laws of foreign jurisdictions, taking into consideration culture, economics and regional law, among other factors that create the similarities and differences between jurisdictions. Along the way, students will gain new insight into their own system of law.

Comparative Constitutional Law

Law 707, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Klymovich

Prerequisite: None

Description: TBA

Complex Litigation

Law 610, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours Instructor(s): Prof. Freer

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: A study of the metamorphosis of litigation from the simple two-party model to multi-party, multi-claim litigation increasingly prevalent today, including the causes of this change and ability of the legal system to resolve such disputes. The course centers on a detailed study of the class action device, including jurisdictional and due process implications. Also included is the study of the problem of duplicative state and federal litigation, judicial control of complex cases, including multi-district litigation procedures and the case management movement, discovery, and problems relating to preclusion in complex cases.

Constitutional Law: Religion & State

Law 646Y, 08A

Credit: 3 Hours

Selection: Open Bidding

Instructor(s): Prof. Goldfeder

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take-Home Exam

Description: This course will explore questions arising under the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses of the First Amendment as well as religion clauses in representative state constitutions and their colonial antecedents. Consideration will be given to cases concerning religious speech, worship and symbolism in the public square, the public school, and the workplace; government support for, and protection of religious education in public and private schools; tax exemption of religious institutions and properties; treatment of religious claims of Native Americans and various religious minorities; the freedom of religious exemptions and their limits; exercise of and limitations on religious law and discipline, control and disposition of religious property; and other issues.

Classes will consist of lecture and discussion. Students will be given a take-home examination to be distributed to the last day of class and to be returned the last day of the examination period. Enrollment in History of Church-State Relations in the West or American Constitutional Law is NOT a prerequisite to enrollment in this course.

Constitutional Rights, Constitutional Controversies

Law 698L; 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Perry

Prerequisite: Non (1L who have not taken Con Law, please contact instructor 1st)

Grading Criteria: Course Participation and Final exam

Description: In the last forty years—the period since the early 1970s—the Supreme Court of the United States has resolved, on the basis of the Constitution of the United States, many contested "rights" controversies that are closely aligned with divisive moral controversies—controversies involving, e.g., capital punishment, abortion, race-based affirmative action, physician-assisted suicide, and, most recently, same-sex marriage. In this course, we will study and evaluate several such controversies. A principal, recurring issue throughout the course: What role should the Supreme Court play—how large a role, or how small—in resolving constitutional controversies that are closely aligned with divisive moral controversies? The final exam will be of the “take home” variety.

Copyright Law

Law 710, 02A 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Beck

Prerequisites: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Copyright law offers protection for originalworks including music, paintings, photographs, sculpture, movies, books, plays, fabric , architectural works, software and visual art. This course examines copyright law and its ability to respond to recent developments in technology. Course topics include the exclusive rights a copyright confers; infringement; defenses, including "fair use"; and remedies. There is also discussion of copyright litigation strategies and tactics employed by Professor Beck on behalf of his clients in the course of his private practice; in that sense, the class aims to be relatively pragmatic rather than theoretical.

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I

Law 959, 10A

Law 959, 02A 

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Metzger

Prerequisite: Evidence & Trial Techniques;

Grading Criteria: Class work

Enrollment: Strictly limited to 12 students

Class open to 2Ls and 3Ls

Description: This course introduces students to basic acting, directing and writing tools a lawyer needs to motivate and persuade jurors, and applies these tools to courtroom performance. Using lectures, exercises, readings, individual performance and video playback, the course helps students develop concentration, observation skills, storytelling, spontaneity, and physical and vocal technique. Students also gain practical experience applying these tools to the presentation of openings and closings as well as questioning witnesses and jurors.

Students reflected on what they gained from taking this class:

"I think what is most drastically different is how much more professional I came across later in the semester."

-Ben S.

"The largest benefit I drew from our class was the ability to stand comfortably in front of a group of people."

-Diana S.

"The most valuable aspect is practice, practice, practice, especially when combined with live and individualized feedback. I can make presentations with significantly less internal anxiety than before, and with more organization and the outward appearance of credibility." -Andrew R.

"This class taught me that putting work into your speaking style can really pay off! I also found the freedom during this class to try some experiments with my speaking technique, including not memorizing a script and moving about my space." -Alan W.

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication

Law 622B, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Levine

Prerequisite: Criminal Law

Grading Criteria: Modified open book, in-class final exam; 6-8 page paper; meritorious class participation.

Enrollment: 30

Description: This course will examine how lawyers and judges behave in the criminal courts throughout the United States, as well as the legal doctrines implicated by their behavior. Topics include discovery, pre-trial detention, jury selection, prosecutorial charging and bargaining, ineffective assistance of counsel, double jeopardy, and speedy trial issues. Readings address material from law, sociology, history, and public policy. Students should note that this class has a strong sociology focus; it is not predominantly doctrinal.

Directed research is an independent scholarly project of your own design, meant to lead to the production of an original work of scholarship. Once you have secured a faculty advisor and have defined your project, you should download the directed research form (see below). In this form, indicate whether you are seeking one unit (a 15 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.) or two units (a 30 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.).

Complete information and the application form are available on the secure Directed Research web page »

Doing Deals: Accounting in Action

Law 659E, 09A

STUDENTS WHO HAVE PREVIOUSLY TAKEN ACCOUNTING OR FINANCE COURSES ARE NOW PERMITTED TO TAKE THIS CLASS ON A PASS/FAIL BASIS ONLY WHICH WILL TAKE UP THREE OF THEIR SIX PASS/FAIL HOURS. 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: This course is designed for those liberal arts majors who know nothing about accounting and finance. Students will learn about the fundamental financial statement concepts. Then the course will turn to the study of how lawyers use those concepts in practice.

Doing Deals: Commercial Real Estate Transactions

Law 659G, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elliott & Prof. Taylor

Prerequisite: Real Estate Finance (concurrent okay) and Contract Drafting

Grading Criteria: Midterm, Class Participation, Drafting of Documents

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course will concentrate on sales, finance and leasing of commercial real estate. It will require significant amounts of time devoted to financial analysis of real estate projects and to negotiating and drafting of documents. It is designed specifically to include JD, LLM, and MBA students. Work groups will consist of JD, LLM, and MBA students working together as lawyer and client to analyze, negotiate and document the acquisition and subsequent leasing of a shopng center. The text for the course is a business school real estate finance text. Legal materials will be made available as handouts. A basic knowledge of Excel will be helpful but not required.

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting
  • Law 659A, 09A 
  • Law 659A, 09B 
  • Law 659A, 04A
  • Law 659A, 04B 
  • Law 659A, 04C 
  • Law 659A, 04D 
  • Law 659A, 04E 

NOTE: CONTRACT DRAFTING AND DEAL SKILLS WILL BE PREREQUISITES TO ALL DOING DEALS CAPSTONE COURSES

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (highly recommended as prerequisite)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course teaches students the principles of drafting commercial agreements. Although the course will be of particular interest to students pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

In this course, students will learn how transactional lawyers translate the business deal into contract provisions, as well as techniques for minimizing ambiguity and drafting with clarity. Through a combination of lecture, hands-on drafting exercises, and extensive homework assignments, students will learn about different types of contracts, other documents used in commercial transactions, and the drafting problems the contracts and documents present. The course will also focus on how a drafter can add value to a deal by finding, analyzing, and resolving business issues.

The grade will be based on specific homework assignments and class participation.

Doing Deals: Corporate Practice

Law 659H, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations

Grading Criteria: Written Problems and Class Participation

Enrollment: 12

Description: The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting. This course will provide students with broad exposure to a variety of corporate problems, including contract negotiation and drafting typical of current corporate practice, complex corporate structuring issues, joint ventures, and non-litigation corporate dispute resolution. The course exercises will involve questions of corporate, tax, employment, and debtor-creditor law. Although prior course work in these areas is not required, it is preferable to have some interest in and familiarity with these areas.

Because student participation is essential for the success of this practice-simulation course, attendance is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade. This course also requires collaborative work with other students and meetings with the adjunct faculty. You will be required to schedule several meetings in addition to regular class time. In addition, any students on the wait list for this class must attend the first class meeting, which sets the stage for the first several weeks of assignments.

Doing Deals: Deal Skills
  • Law 659B, 09A
  • Law 659B, 04A 
  • Law 659B, 04B
  • Law 659B, 04C 
  • Law 659B, 04D
  • Law 659B, 04E 
  • Law 659B, 04F 

NOTE: CONTRACT DRAFTING AND DEAL SKILLS WILL BE PREREQUISITES TO ALL DOING DEALS CAPSTONE COURSES

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Contract Drafting (required – concurrent not okay); Business Associations

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: Deal Skills will introduce students to business and legal issues common to commercial transactions, whether a multi-billion dollar M&A deal, a license agreement, a commercial real estate transaction or a financing transaction. Among the topics to be covered are the lawyer’s role as the translator of the business deal into contract concepts, client interviewing and communication, negotiation, due diligence, corporate actions and records, indemnities, transaction management, closings, and ethical issues. The course will be conducted through workshop exercises, in-class role-plays, and lecture, and will also include out-of-class due diligence, negotiation and other exercises.

Doing Deals: Mergers & Acquisitions Workshop

Law 659J, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent not okay); Contract Drafting; Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Participation in Simulated Transaction, Written Assignments and Class Participation (NO EXAM)

Enrollment: 12

Description: This class is designed to provide law school students who intend to practice transactional law with some of the basic practical skills required to counsel companies with respect to business combinations. The focus of the course will be to identify and discuss the factors involved in a typical business combination, the roles of the parties and the relevant documents. The course is intended to ease the transition from law school to junior transactional associate.

Doing Deals: Negotiated Corporate Transactions

Law 659K, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent not okay); Contract Drafting; Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Course Work and Class Participation

Enrollment: 12

Description: This class will enable the students to develop the types of skills needed for success in a transactional based law practice. Emphasis will be placed on the development of interviewing, drafting, and negotiation skills. The students will work through a hypothetical transaction that will be focal point of the entire semester. The class will be divided between the lawyers representing the buyer and the lawyers representing the seller. Students will interview the Professor (client) throughout the semester and develop goals, strategies, and documents that will meet the needs of the client. The semester will include the drafting and negotiation of a confidentiality agreement, letter of intent, development and review of a due diligence data room and will culminate in the drafting and negotiation of a final purchase agreement.

Doing Deals: Venture Capital

Law 659C, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBD

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting, Deal Skills,

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Enrollment: 12

Description: This course will study the business and legal issues in venture capital transactions. The course will be taught primarily through simulations.

Education Law & Policy: Education Reform at a Crossroads

Law 662, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Waldman

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: In-class exercises and final paper

Description: This course will survey constitutional, statutory and policy issues affecting children in our public elementary and secondary schools. An emphasis will be placed on issues that impact the children most at risk for educational failure and that contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline. Topics will include the right to an education, school discipline, special education, alternative educational programs, No Child Left Behind and high stakes testing, the rights of homeless youth and youth in foster care, and laws designed to address bullying in our schools.

Employment Discrimination

Law 669, 08A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Shanor

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will focus on development of law and policy under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Equal Pay Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Employment Discrimination Lab

Law 669X, 06A

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Shultz & Prof. King,

Prerequisite: Employment Discrimination or Employment Law

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Enrollment: (cap of 8 students)

Description: The class will work though an employment law case from meeting the client to a mock jury trial. The students will be divided into 2 law firms. One firm represents the Plaintiff and the other firm represents the Defendant. The classes are lead by Chad Shultz and Carlton King., but this is an interactive class that encourages group discussion and student participation. The written assignments will include a demand letter (Plaintiff’s firm), a response to the demand letter (defense); summary judgment brief and reply (simplified and limited to no more than 8 pages). Each student will also participate in deposing a witness, argue the motion for summary judgment, and play a role in the trial of the case. This is a hands-on class that will allow you prosecute and defend an employment case from start to finish.

Energy Law

Law 660, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Crofton

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: The course examines state, federal and international regulation of energy markets and the development, production and distribution of energy. The course will emphasize the interrelation of energy policy with other legal and economic policy areas.

Entertainment Law

Law 720, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Sanders

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property, or Trademark Law, or Copyright Law (concurrent okay)

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will provide an overview of the rapidly developing body of law associated with the entertainment industries concentrating in the areas of music publishing and commercial recording, live performance, literary publishing and motion pictures. The course will focus on a study of entertainment law cases, aspects of copyright law, personal rights and negotiation of entertainment agreements.

Estate Planning

Law 916, 02A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Pennell, Jeff

Prerequisite: Trusts & Estates [There are no tax course prerequisites for Estate Planning]

Grading Criteria: Take Home Exam

Description: Selected problems in estate analysis and planning involving drafting of wills and trusts utilizing future interests, class gifts, powers of appointment, generation-skipping arrangements, and qualification for the marital deduction. Consideration of planning for business interests, insurance, and employee benefits also is included.

European Union Law

Law 620, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Mickevicius

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: The largest trade and investment relationship in the world, overlapping geopolitical concerns, and crucial shared values make the European Union one of the United States’ most important partners – economically, politically, and socially. Lawyers, public servants, and activists are consequently being called upon to engage (and understand) European legal principles and practices to an ever-growing degree. With that in mind, this course will examine the theoretical fundamentals of the EU legal system and their practical applications. This begins with the constitutional framework of the EU, including its political and legal nature, its aims and guiding values, membership and the division of powers between the EU and the Members States, institutional makeup and the allocation of powers across its major institutions, and the structure and role of the EU judicial system. Building on the latter, we will then turn to the EU model of judicial review and the complex interaction between the EU and national legal systems in enforcing EU law. Finally, we will consider the body of EU legislation and case law ensuring economic freedom (freedom of movement for goods, establishments, services, workers, and capital) and fair competition – elements of EU business law that are essential to the operation of an effective single market – as well as recent developments in the creation of a unified concept of EU citizenship, and in the protection of individual freedoms within the EU.

Evidence

Law 632X, 04A

MUST BE TAKEN IN THE SECOND YEAR

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Goldfeder

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: A general consideration of the law of evidence with a focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Coverage includes relevance, hearsay, witnesses, presumptions and burdens of proof, writings, scientific and demonstrative evidence, and privilege.

Family Law I

Law 633, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Broyde

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will address the problems, policies, and laws related to the formation and dissolution of the marital relationship. Among the topic covered will be marriage, divorce, child custody and other related topics.

Federal Appellate Practice

Law 614, 05A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Marcovitch, Robert

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Description: In this class, students will engage in an immersive mock appellate exercise based on the record of a case pending in the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, which that Court has agreed to consider en banc. Students will write briefs from the record, participate in mock oral arguments, and write “draft” opinions in the case. If possible, the class will also attend the en banc oral argument of the appeal in the Eleventh Circuit. Lectures will address the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure and their practical application, as well as instruction on writing a well-crafted and persuasive appellate brief.

This course is a prerequisite for enrollment in a clinical course to be offered in the Spring 2014 semester in which students will handle actual Eleventh Circuit cases, along with the instructor, under that Court’s third-year practice rule. The Spring 2015 clinical course will be open only to third year students.

Federal Courts

Law 721, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Nash

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course deals with the allocation of judicial business between the state and federal courts, as well as the jurisdictional tensions that arise from a dual judicial system. In addition, the course considers the relationship between the federal judiciary and Congress, particularly as it implicates legislature’s power to structure and limit the federal courts’ subject matter jurisdiction. This is a very practical course, as well as one that implicates important theoretical issues about decision-making institutions under our federal system of government.

Federal Income Tax: Corporations

Law 642, 02A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Fowler

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax 3 or 4 hours only requisite not co-requisite

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Survey of the general structure of taxation of corporations. Considers the tax issues arising from the formation, operation, liquidation, and reorganization of corporations. An important course for anyone interested in transactional law.

Federal Income Tax: Individuals

Law 640L, 08A

Credit: 4 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Brown

Federal Income Tax: Partnerships

Law 942, 08A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Beaudrot

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Income Tax

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course examines the taxation of partnerships, joint ventures, and LLCs. We will look at the formation, financing, and operation of these entities to understand the impact the tax rules have on financial returns and investment structures. This is an essential class for those interested in venture capital, private equity, real estate, or international business transactions.

Federal Prosecutions Practice

Law 760, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Grimberg

Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure recommended, but not required

Grading Criteria: In-class exercises and take-home written assignments

Description: This class will explore the powers, principles, and responsibilities that come with serving as a federal prosecutor. Class segments will focus on the day-to-day responsibilities of federal prosecutors throughout the various stages of the criminal justice system. We will discuss the motivating factors that guide federal prosecution decisions in light of legal, policy, practical and ethical considerations. The class will involve a mix of lecture and “learn by doing” exercises that will be geared towards developing your analytical, oral and written advocacy skills.

Fundamentals of Innovation II

Law 890A, 04A

OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Rector

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property

Description: Innovation and technological change are critical to wealth creation in today’s global economy. However the process that often begins in the research lab traveling a path towards product development, market development, product commercialization and life cycle management is uncertain and typically difficult. More often than not, ideas will “die the good death” well before given the opportunity to develop into profitable markets. Fundamentals of Innovation I is first of a two-course sequence on the various techniques and approaches needed to understand the innovation process within the context of technology commercialization. In the Fall semester, the course is focused on 1) helping students develop an understanding of innovation basics including the overall innovation process and roles and skills of various key players; 2) discussing patterns of technology change and alternate management processes for each; 3) organizing the innovation team and developing frameworks that foster team creativity; 4) understanding forms and protections afforded Intellectual Property; and 5) discussing early stage approaches to product definition (working models to engineering prototypes) and preliminary market definition.

The fall course and the companion course in the spring will provide the academic core to the student’s first year in the Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results (“TI:GER”) program and will be taught as a series of learning modules. Each module and class session is lead by a faculty or guest instructor with in depth experience in that particular technology commercialization topic. Students will take each course as a “community of participants” and will participate on both an individual and team level. Innovation teams that are comprised of the PhD candidates, MBA and JD students, will be formed mid-semester and will participate both in in-class activities and cases, as well as in an “engaged learning” experience intended to simulate the technology commercialization process. The technology/research that will drive the innovation teams will be provided by the PhD candidates and their advisors.

Health Law

Law 736, 12A

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor: Prof. Bergeson

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Health care is one of the largest sectors of the economy, and the practice of health law is growing. This course is an introduction to regulatory health law. The course will address select topics in health law, including: regulation of physicians and health care institutions, confidentiality, informed consent, individual and institutional obligations to provide care, discrimination in access to care, public and private health insurance structures, and some of the major statutes that govern health care providers. Health care is heavily regulated and the regulations can become trip-wires for the unwary. The course is intended to teach fundamental skills necessary to be a practicing lawyer who advises health care providers and suppliers. The class will not focus on health policy; health policy will be discussed only as background to understanding the regulatory framework within which a practicing health lawyer advises clients.

Intellectual Property

Law 608, 08A 

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Holbrook

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

THIS COURSE IS A PREREQUISITE FOR INTERNET LAW AND ENTERTAINMENT LAW AND INTERNATIONAL & COMPARATIVE PATENT LAW SEMINAR.

Description: This course will serve as an introduction to patent, trademark, and copyright law. The course will explore the policy and legal foundations for these areas of law and the scope of protection which each affords. The requirements for protection will be examined and compared. The framework for the administrative procedures, which support the patent and trademark systems, will also be discussed. In part, the course will direct attention to the question as to the legitimacy of these forms of property and appropriateness of protection. What constitutes infringement of intellectual property rights will be discussed. Methods for avoiding infringement and scienter with respect to infringement will also be discussed. Remedies and questions of civil procedure and appellate review will receive brief consideration.

IP Contracting: From Start-Up to Bankruptcy

Law 608A, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Vertinsky

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property or Patent or Copyright or Trademark (concurrent okay)

Description: Intellectual property transactions are pervasive in the modern economy, shaping and facilitating the distribution, commercialization and use of ideas, technologies, and information. IP transactions, including licensing and other IP agreements, play an important role in commerce, education, the arts, and a range of other areas involving the creation and use of intangible assets. This class will provide a survey of some of the key laws, cases, and issues relevant to licensing and other forms of IP transactions in the United States. It will cover selected topics in patent, trade secret, copyright and trademark licensing, followed by applied topics such as open source licensing and technology transfer between public and private entities.

Intellectual Property Litigation

Law 608B, 04A

Instructor: Prof. North

Description: In the past, the areas of patent, copyright, and trademark were treated as distinct fields of law. In the modern marketplace, however, products likely involve consideration of all three of these forms of intellectual property protection. For example, the simple, ubiquitous insulating patent sleeve features patented, copyrighted, and trademarked elements. This class focuses the enforcement of IP rights through litigation with an eye to training students how to identify issues that cross these various regimes for a single product or situation. The class will focus on important skills such as drafting of motions, discovery, and expert testimony.

International Business Transactions

Law 730, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Dean

Prerequisite(s): None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will be a survey of practical issues that arise in cross-border transactions, including both outbound and inbound (from a US perspective) trade and investment transactions. We will discuss issues that affect transactions involving international trading of goods, project development and acquisitions. Topics will include letters of credit, international trade terms such as INCOTERMS, joint venture agreements, and international transfer of technology. We will also cover some selected aspects of government regulation of international trade and investment.

International Human Rights

Law 690, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Van der Vyver

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam or Essay

Description: This course focuses on international concerns for the upholding of human rights standards in legal systems of the world. It defines the concept of human rights, and distinguishes different categories of human rights that have developed over the years, namely (a) natural rights of the individual; (b) civil and political rights; (c) economic, social and cultural rights; and (d) solidarity rights. General problems relating to the theoretical basis of human rights will come under the spotlight in this section, including the universality and relativity of human rights, and the right to self-determination of peoples.

The course further deals with mechanisms for the protection and promotion of international human rights at three distinct levels: (a) globally, under auspices of the United Nations Organization, with emphasis on the binding effect of the human rights standards enunciated in the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, promotion and protection of those rights by the Human Rights Council, and the proclamation and enforcement of certain categories of rights in virtue of international conventions and covenants sponsored by the United Nations; (b) regionally, in Europe under auspices of the Council of Europe, the European Union, and the Helsinki Accord, in the Americas under auspices of the Organization of American States; and in Africa under auspices of the African Union; and (c) thematically, under auspices of specialized agencies such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) and UNESCO.

When dealing with the promotion and protection of human rights under auspices of the United Nations, special attention will be given to the question whether or not the provisions in the U.N. Charter dealing with human rights are self-executing in the United States, and decisions of the Human Rights Council dealing with, for example, the defamation of a religion, and human rights violations committed by Israel in the West Bank and in Gaza. We have also singled out particular rights and freedoms for closer scrutiny, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion or belief, and the international protection of rights of the child.

The section on the Council of Europe pays special attention to the doctrine of a margin of appreciation developed by the European Court of Human Rights, which affords to High Contracting Parties a first bite at the cherry to decide whether circumstances exist in their respective countries that would warrant limitations to be imposed on particular rights or freedoms enunciated in the European Convention for the Protection of Basic Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, and to the doctrine of positive obligations, which places on High Contracting Parties a duty to protect persons under their jurisdiction against violations of their rights by the State and by non-State actors. It further focuses on a selection of judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, such as those relating to torture, sexual orientation, and extradition constraints (the latter involving the United States).

The section on the Inter-American system for the protection of human rights singles out decisions of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights that condemned the United States for not observing basic principles of the Inter-American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man of 1948, for example ones that dealt with racial discrimination in the sentencing of convicted criminals, the death penalty, abortions, and non-compliance by the United States with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations.

The latter set of cases will also bring into contention three judgments of the International Court of Justice condemning the United States for non-compliance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, and responses of the U.S. Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court of Germany to those judgments. The enforcement of international human rights in federal courts of the United States in cases such as Medéllin v.

Texas and in virtue of the Alien Torts Statute and Article 1, Section 8, Paragraph 10 of the U.S. Constitution places the Vienna Convention judgments in a broader perspective.

International Humanitarian Law

Law 676, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Van der Vyver

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam or essay

Description: September 11th, the war in Afghanistan and in Iraq, and the status of Afghani captives being held at Guantánamo Bay; the testing and stockpiling of weapons of mass destruction; the violent conflict in Israel and Palestine, and in Libya; and attempts to establish an Islamic State (ISIS) in Syria and Iraq are all matters that come within the range of international humanitarian law: the law of armed conflict. International humanitarian law applies to and in times of armed conflict and differentiates between international armed conflicts and armed conflicts not of an international character. The war in Bosnia/Herzegovina and jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) illustrate the complexities attending that distinction. The U.S. Supreme Court decided in the Hamdan Case that the “war against terror” is an armed conflict not of an international character because it is not a war between States. This view is at odds with jurisprudence of the ICTY and the International Criminal Court (ICC). It is also extremely difficult to establish precisely under what conditions an internal uprising would be considered an armed conflict for the purposes of international humanitarian law.

The rules of international humanitarian law fall into two main categories:

(a) the ius ad bellum (the law relating to armed conflict): under what circumstances is the taking up of arms to resolve an international or internal dispute legitimate, and when would it constitute the international crime of aggression?

(b) the ius in bello (the law applying in times of war), which comprises two main subject-matters:

The rules regulating the means and methods of conducting hostilities (what weapons may be used, and what persons or objects may be targeted);

How must belligerent parties treat persons and objects not engaged in, or used for, actual combat, such as the wounded or sick members of the armed forces in the field; the wounded, sick or shipwrecked members of the armed forces at sea; prisoners of war; and civilians.

Under (a), the course will explore the legitimacy of, for example, wars of liberation, the right to self-defense, and humanitarian intervention, with special emphasis on the war in Iraq, the Israeli offensive in Gaza, the use of armed force in Libya, and the current bombing campaign in Syria and Iraq. Under (b)(i), questions such as the legality of the threat or use of a wide spectrum of armament, ranging from dumdum bullets to nuclear, bacteriological and chemical weapons, as well as legitimate/illegitimate targets of an armed attack, will be considered. Under (b)(ii), matters such as the treatment of prisoners of war and of the wounded and sick

soldiers, and the protection of civilians and civilian objects, including cultural property, in times of war will come under the spotlight.

Particular problems that have emerged from recent judgments of the ICC and of the Supreme Court of Israel include the conscription and enlistment, and the use in actual combat, of children under the age of 15 years, and the use of a human shield to protect legitimate military targets from an armed attack.

International Humanitarian Law Clinic

Law 676C, ____

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Blank

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: International Law; International Humanitarian Law; International Criminal Law; International Human Rights; Counterterrorism Law

Grading Criteria: Graded

Enrollment: By application

Description: The International Humanitarian Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to do real-world work on issues relating to international law and armed conflict, counterterrorism, national security, transitional justice and accountability for atrocities. Students work directly with organizations, including international tribunals, militaries and non-governmental organizations, under the supervision of the Director of the IHL Clinic, Professor Laurie Blank. The IHL Clinic also includes a weekly class seminar with lecture and discussion introducing students to the foundational framework of and contemporary issues in international humanitarian law (otherwise known as the law of armed conflict).

Law 608C

Credit:  3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Holz

Prerequisite: (any of the core IP classes would be sufficient - Intellectual Property, Copyright, Trademark, or Patent)

Grading: Exam

Description: Intellectual property rights still remain creatures of national law. Historically, though, intellectual property law has been a part of a broader network of treaties and international organizations. In the last 30 years, much of the evolution in intellectual property law has occurred at the international level, driving changes in domestic law due to either treaty obligations or interests in harmonizing the laws of various countries. Countries have also come to realize, somewhat controversially at times, that intellectual property and trade are linked, with intellectual property rights potentially acting as barriers to trade. The creation of the World Trade Organization has now given nations a mechanism to enforce various intellectual property obligations. This course will explore the various treaty regimes that govern intellectual property rights, the international organizations (such as the WTO and the World Intellectual Property Organization) and their involvement in international intellectual property, the use of domestic intellectual property rights extraterritorially, and comparative differences between US and the law of other countries.

International Law

Law 732, 04A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. An-Na’im

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: The objective of this course is to introduce students to the general principles of Public International Law from a critical contemporary perspective; and to discuss the challenges to the structural and institutional limitations of that state-centric legal order in its global political context. The underlying theme will also include the implications of global transformations in the actors and processes of the rule of law in international relations.

Jewish Law

Law 664, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Broyde

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper or Take-Home Exam

Description: This course will survey the principles Jewish (or Talmudic) law uses to address difficult legal issues and will compare these principles to those that guide legal discussion in America. In particular, this course will focus on issues raised by advances in medical technology such as surrogate motherhood, artificial insemination, and organ transplant. Through discussion of these difficult topics many areas of Jewish law will be surveyed.

Law & Economics

Law 628Y, 09A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. J. Shepherd

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Enrollment: 80

Description: This course introduces students to the economic analysis of the law. Because economics provides a tool for studying how legal rules affect the way people behave, understanding economic analysis of legal problems has become an important part of a lawyer's education. The ability to predict the effects of legal rules helps the practicing lawyer furnish advice and make arguments before courts. It is also a prerequisite for the evaluation of legal policy. Over the last twenty-five years, the economic approach has grown in importance in academia as well as in legal and judicial practice. The course will explore several economic methods and concepts and apply them to illuminate and critique familiar areas of law, including criminal law, torts, contracts, property, and civil procedure. There are no prerequisites for this course; a background in economics is not necessary (or even very helpful).

Law in Public Health

Law 736A, 04A

Credit: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Kocher

Prerequisite: None

Grading criteria: Attendance, classroom participation, short oral presentation, and take-home exam

Site: Most sessions will meet at Emory Law, but a small number of sessions may be held at CDC headquarters on Clifton Rd)

Description: Law and public health are tightly intertwined. Law students can benefit from an improved understanding of the legal principles and laws underlying the complex and cross-disciplinary field of public health practice in the United States.

This course surveys law as it defines public health and is used by local, state, and federal government agencies as a tool to address contemporary public health problems in the United States. The course features a cross-disciplinary emphasis on the link between both the law and science of public health practice. The course specifically addresses foundational sources for public health law in the United States, including constitutional, statutory, regulatory, and case law. In addition, this course provides an examination of controlling law and emerging legal issues associated with selected topics drawn from bioterrorism, natural disasters, and other public health emergencies; public health surveillance and outbreak investigations; public health research and health information; special populations (including, for example, the aging population, persons with mental disabilities, prisoners, children, and homeless populations); and key public health topical areas, such as environmental issues; vaccination; foodborne diseases; tobacco use-related problems; and injuries.

Legal Analysis and Writing for Non-Lawyers

Law 879, 06A

Accelerated Class: First seven weeks

Selection: Click here for Pre-selection form.

Credit: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Kirk

Prerequisite: None

Description: This course will cover sources and systems of law, the structure and content of legal arguments, and exam preparation and outlining. It will also cover communicating with non-lawyers, basic legal citation, and legal research.

Legal Profession

Law 747, 12A

STUDENTS CONSIDERING A LITIGATION FIELD PLACEMENT IN THEIR THIRD YEAR ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO TAKE LEGAL PROFESSION.

Credit: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Elliott

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: The rules and principles of professional ethics, other regulatory constraints on lawyers, the elements of malpractice liability and the values of professionalism.

National Security

Law 652, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Blank

Description: This course surveys the framework of domestic and international laws that authorize and restrain the pursuit of the U.S. government’s national security policies. Central issues include the sources, foundation and structure of national security law; the participants in the national security system, their constitutional roles, and the nature of power sharing among branches of government; and the law applicable to specific national security issues such as the use of military force, the activities of the intelligence community, and counterterrorism activities.

Negotiations
  • Law 656, 06A (Athans & Lytle)  
  • Law 656, 06B (Eldridge)  

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Athans/Prof. Eldridge

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class preparation/participation and written assignment – No Exam

COURSE NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE LAW SCHOOL OR NEGOTIATIONS IN THE BUSINESS SCHOOL

Description: This hands-on skills course will explore the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating settlements in both a litigation and a transactional context. The objectives of the course will be to develop proficiency in a variety of negotiation techniques as well as a substantive knowledge of the theory and practice, or the art and science of negotiations. Each week during class, students will negotiate fictitious clients' positions, sometimes proceeded by a lecture and followed by critique and comparison of results with other students. Each problem will be designed to illustrate particular negotiation strategies as well as highlight selected professional and ethical issues. Preparation for class will include development of a negotiation strategy, reflective written memoranda required.

Privacy Law: Data and Drones in the Digital Age

Law 672, 10A

Credit:

Instructor(s): Prof. Cloud

Grading Criteria: Final exam (essay)

Description: The course will examine U.S. law governing informational and spatial privacy rights, including any restrictions they impose upon invasions by both government and private actors. The course will focus upon three topics. (1) The origins and history of the legal right to privacy in the United States, which was not recognized until the twentieth century. (2) The right to informational privacy for tangible documents, photographs, digital communications, and electronically stored information, regardless of the technologies used to create, transmit, and store the information. (3) The right to spatial privacy from physical trespasses and from a variety intrusions on privacy accomplished by using technological devices, like the use of drones for both visual and photographic information gathering.

Products Liability

Law 663, 10A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Zwier

Prerequisite: Torts

Grading Criteria: Exam

Enrollment: 24

Description: Products Liability is the study of causes of action, defenses, processes and procedures that apply to products that cause injury. A large variation of products are considered including, vehicles, machines, toys, food, clothing, contraceptives, tobacco, lighters, guns, airplanes and pharmaceuticals. Tension in the cases is palpable because most products suits are brought against major American and foreign corporations. The class will also engage in simulations that not only explore the students understanding of products liability law, but will simultaneously seek to develop litigation skills involving negotiations, case development and strategy and advocacy.

Regulation of Healthcare Providers

Law 744, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Miller

Prerequisite: Health Law (RECOMMENDED)

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Healthcare providers are subject to an array of state and Federal regulation, which regulation is not the result of a comprehensive scheme to implement a coherent policy. The result is a complex set of laws that often reflect the “health care policy of the moment” at the time they were adopted. This course will cover this largely unordered set of laws regulating provider conduct, as follows:

1. Licensure and Other Controls on Physician Practice—(a) state practice of medicine laws and state disciplinary actions; (b) hospital peer review and medical staff disciplinary actions, the Health Care Quality Improvement Act’s effect on peer review & the National Practitioner Data Bank; (c) Medicare regulation of the quality of care; and (d) other federal regulation of physicians.

2. Regulation of Institutional Providers—(a) Medicare

conditions of participation for hospitals and ”deemed status” by virtue of private accreditation; and (b) state “Never Event” statutes.

3. Billing and Reimbursement—(a) regulation of physician Medicare billing practices, including the Resource Based Relative Value Scale methodology, violation of terms of assignment, and billing in excess of the Medicare limiting charge; (b) regulation of hospital billing practices, including the DRG prospective payment system, and cost report and billing certifications; and (c) Medicare’s use of reimbursement rules to improve quality of care, including e-prescribing bonuses & refusal to pay for certain hospital readmissions.

4. Remedial and Prophylactic Statutes—(a) Medicare/Medicaid anti-kickback criminal law, including definition of “intent”, safe harbors and advisory opinions; (b) Ethics in Patient Referral Act (Stark II) prohibitions on self-referral; (c) civil and criminal liability for false claims; (d) Medicare/Medicaid Civil Monetary Penalties Law; and (e) exclusion from federal health programs.

The course will begin with a review of the 2010 Health Reform Act and its effect on healthcare providers and patients.

Remedies

Law 741, 08A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Partlett

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Rights in tort, contract and constitutional law are enforced in court. Whether the remedies that enforce rights are part of the substantive right or supplementary to it, remedies are theoretical and practically essential in understanding, and being fully equipped to practice in, both private and public law. This course will cover legal and equitable remedies. Restitution and monetary damages (including the "rightful position" principle, consequential damages, and damages for dignitary and constitutional harms) form the core, while injunctions – preventive, reparative, and structural – supplement remedies with which students will be familiar from courses in torts, contracts, property, and constitutional law. Other topics will include declarative judgments, contempt, and attorneys' fees, which are necessary to understanding the power of the courts to deliver justice. Reference will be made to the scope of self-help and apology, and similar non-monetary relief.

Secured Transactions

Law 713, 10A Class Number:

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Pardo

Prerequisite(s): None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will examine the law relating to the creation, perfection, and enforcement of security interests in personal property. Reading and class discussion will center on Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and will include an introduction to the intersection of Article 9 with the federal bankruptcy laws, the creation and status of non-UCC liens on personal property (by operation of law or by execution of a judgment, e.g.), and non-UCC enforcement mechanisms, such as foreclosure, repossession, and garnishment. Attention will also be paid to the business context within which Article 9 operates, ie, debt financing.

Securities: Brokers/Dealers

Law 673, 06A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Terry

Description: This course is intended to be a follow-up course to the Securities Regulation course, which covers registration of new securities issues, disclosure and anti-fraud issues, and the coverage of securities laws. This course approaches securities regulation of the standpoint of the intermediaries between the issuers and purchaser - broker-dealers and investment advisers. It is intended to provide an academic foundation of relevant law, as well as practical information also relevant to a law practice in the area.

Much of the course will focus on the regulatory scheme and activities of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), a self-regulatory body which is the principal day-to-day regulator of the broker-dealer industry. FINRA is the entity with which most broker-dealers and their counsel will typically interact with regard to most regulatory matters.

In addition, the course will look at investment advisers, a rapidly growing piece of the securities industry. An investment adviser is regulated either by the SEC or by state regulators, depending upon its size. Investment advisers are subject to a completely separate regulatory regimen, although there are many examples of overlap with broker-dealer regulatory issues since many firms, or their affiliates, are dually registered.

The interplay between the two regulatory schemes has been the focus of much discussion and legislative and regulatory activity over the past fifteen years, including several parts of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Finally, the course will provide insight into practical considerations of regulatory interaction, in both routine settings as well as enforcement matters.

In addition to private practice, graduating students with an interest in securities might find opportunities with brokerage firms, regulators and public corporations. The combination of the Securities Regulation course and this course should provide graduating students a thorough overview of most of the issues they might see if they enter into a securities-related practice. 

Special Topics in Technology Commercialization

Law 892, 000

OPEN TO TI:GER STUDENTS ONLY. PROFESSOR PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Rector

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property

Grading Criteria: TBA

Description: This course will cover special topics in technology commercialization.

Sports & Marketing Law

Law 693, 10A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Linsky

Grading Criteria: in-class participation, small projects and a paper

Description: This course will provide a practical overview of the laws governing professional sports and advertising, examining issues relating to the various participants - the fans, the sponsors, the owners, the teams, the leagues, the players and the coaches. Advertising is included in this overview of the laws governing sports because marketing the teams is such an integral part of the operation of a professional sports team and knowledge of the various laws surrounding advertising and promotions would benefit anyone interested in this industry.

Twitter handle for students who register for the class or who are interested in sports law issues to follow: @MsSportsLaw.

Tax Controversies

Law 641, 04A

Credit: 2 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Loechel

Prerequisite(s): Fundamentals of Income Tax

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will focus on the resolution of federal tax controversies through both administrative procedures and litigation. Specifically, we will consider filing requirements, audit procedures, administrative appeals, deficiencies, assessments, including termination and jeopardy assessments, penalties, interest, and the statute of limitations. Additionally, we will take a practical approach to problems and considerations arising in the litigation of cases before the U.S. Tax Court, District Court, and the Court of Federal Claims, including jurisdictional, procedural, and evidentiary issues. We will examine choice of forum, pleadings, discovery, privileges, and tax trial practice. Finally, we will discuss summons enforcement litigation, civil collection, levy and distraint, and the tax lien and its priorities.

Technology in Legal Practice

Law 879K, 12A

Accelerated Class: February 23, 2015 – April 13, 2015

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Prof. Glon

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Enrollment: 20

Description: Technology in Legal Practice will focus on technology in the practice of law beyond traditional legal research. Areas of coverage will include knowledge management, competitive intelligence, e-discovery and the virtual law practice. Class discussions and readings will be augmented by guest speakers from the legal community. This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the second seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

Trial Techniques

Credit: 2 Hours

COURSE #: 671

This course is required for all 2L Students

Description: The Kessler-Eidson Trial Techniques Program is a required course that introduces students to the evidence issues, ethical dilemmas, and presentation skills essential in the trial of a case. The course has two parts. Part I is designed to integrate the required Evidence class with trial skills. This Spring semester we will look to bring about this integration of evidence and trial techniques by scheduling workshops on the following dates:

January 9, 2015, from 1:00-4:00 p.m. (Tull Auditorium, Lecture Demonstration) We will conduct a workshop on Case Analysis and Relevance. Your assignment is to have read the first of two assigned simulated jury cases file thoroughly, and the assigned chapters from the Prof. Zwier’s Trial Advocacy: Normative Approach, Lecture Notes & Readings in advance of the workshop.

On January 23, 2015, the topic will be Direct and Cross, Hearsay and Character Evidence; 1:00- 4:00 p.m. (1:00 -2:00 p.m. Lecture Demonstration, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. learning-by-doing workshop). (A video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). We will conduct a workshop on Direct and Cross examinations, in which student will examine an assigned witness(s) from a simulated case file. You will be assigned to represent either the plaintiff or defendant and accordingly will be required to prepare either a direct or a cross examination of the assigned witness (es).

On January 30, 2015, the topic and workshop will be on Persuasive and Evidentiary Foundations for Exhibits; 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. (1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Lecture Demonstration, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. learning-by-doing workshop). (A video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). We will conduct a drill on Exhibit Foundations, using specially prepared exhibit problems from the simulated case file. You will be assigned to represent either the plaintiff or defendant and accordingly will be required to prepare relevant exhibit exercises.

On February 6, 2015, the topic will be Jury Selection, 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. (1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Lecture Demonstration, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. learning-by-doing workshop). (A video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). You will engage in a jury selection exercise for the simulated case file. Again, you will be assigned to conduct voir dire for your client as plaintiff's or defendant's counsel. You will also be assigned to play the role of a prospective juror for purposes of the workshop.

On February 13, 2015, the topic will be Technology in the Courtroom, from 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. (1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Lecture Demonstration, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. learning-by-doing workshop). (A video lecture will be assigned for viewing prior to the workshop). You will be asked to utilize the evidence camera and computer display technology using specially prepared exhibits from the simulated case file. You will present on the strengths and weakness from your perspective as plaintiff's or defense counsel, as well as outline and explain your legal strategy, to your client or supervising attorney.

These spring workshops will be conducted by some of Atlanta's finest trial lawyers and evidence teachers. As a result of our bringing them in, you will get an opportunity to work closely with these lawyers (in groups as small as 6-8 students) and not only get their insights about the marriage of practice and theory, but also have a chance to demonstrate your oral advocacy skills to them.

Please note: Two provisions significantly impact the application of these taxes. One is “portability” of a decedent’s estate tax exclusion, and the other is the exclusion itself — which is $5.34 million per taxpayer in 2014 ($10.68 million per married couple) and slated to rise to $5.43 million in 2015 (also double that amount for a married couple). These changes limit application of the wealth transfer taxes to a small segment of the decedent population. As a result, you should enroll only if you intend to become an estate planner for such high net worth clients.

In addition, we have been able to partner with downtown Atlanta law firms and law offices to provide you the opportunity to learn on location at their offices. As a result, when you register you will be able to sign up in groups of 24 at either:

  • Alston & Bird Federal Public Defender's Office Jones Day
  • Kilpatrick Townsend King & Spalding McKenna Long & Aldridge Sutherland Asbill & Brennan Troutman Sanders US Attorney's Office
  • DeKalb County Public Defender's Office
  • Harrison & Ford

You will meet at these offices for the workshops scheduled on January 9, 23, & 30, and February 6, 13, & 20. (The January 9th -- opening lecture/demonstration will be held at the law school in Tull Auditorium). For those of you who wish to work with general practitioners from small to medium sized firms and/or with state and federal court judges, you should sign up for the General Practitioner section. This group will be limited to 26 students and will meet in breakout groups of 13 or workshop exercises at the law school.

This year the May program session will run from May 2, 2015 through May 8, 2015, the days between the last examinations make up day and graduation. The May session presents an intensive week of day long learn-by-doing workshops that build upon the earlier spring semester workshops. The May session will be facilitated by 60 trial attorneys and judges from across the country supplemented by 20 local trial attorneys and judges. On May 6th, students will conduct bench trials on the case file assigned to them over the spring semester. The program will culminate on May 9th with students conducting jury trials.

*Because the program starts right after final exams, do not schedule a take-home exam if it will interfere with the start of the program.

To alleviate any conflicts that may arise, the ABA allows you to miss 2 classes (4 hours) in any two-hour course, unexcused. As a result you will be allowed to miss either one Friday afternoon workshop, or one half day of the intensive May session. You must submit a written notice (an email will suffice) for any anticipated absence to your team leader and the KEPTT Administrative Director. You will not be allowed to miss either of the trial days, as you must serve on those days either as trial counsel, or as a witness. All requests for an excused absence must be personally delivered in writing to the KEPTT Administrative Director.

There is a $145 mandatory course materials fee. You will receive two case files, both in electronic and hard copy form, an electronic copy of Prof. Zwier’s Trial Advocacy: Normative Approach, Lecture Notes & Readings, and a digital video chip. Hard copies of the course materials file will be distributed in advance of the first class meeting at copy center. An electronic copy of the course materials will also be made available on the course Blackboard site.

Wealth Transfer Tax

Law 926, 10A

Credit: 4 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Pennell

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Three Take-Home Exams

Description: An introduction to the federal estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer taxes, with some consideration of their impact on estate-planning techniques, especially inter-spousal and inter-generational transfers made outright or by will or trust.

Seminar: Advanced Negotiation Skills & International Peace Making: Focus on Legitimacy

Law 842, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Zwier & Prof. Crick

Grading Criteria: Paper

Prerequisites: Negotiations or ADR (pre or co requisite).

Enrollment: 16

Description: After a review of strategies and styles in the two party disputes, this seminar will look at complex multiparty international negotiations, including but not limited to: Border Dispute between Bolivia, Chile and Peru: Selected issue in Middle East Peace-- the “Right of Return”, compensation if right of return cannot be exercised, and “Water Rights” ; Sudan – CPA and Darfur; the Dayton Peace Accords. As basic understandings of dispute and conflict resolution techniques will have been covered in the prerequisite courses, we will use as our text Zwier, PRINCIPLED NEGOTIATION AND MEDIATION ON THE INTERNATIONAL ARENA: TALKING WITH EVIL. (Cambridge University Press, 2013). We will also consider an number of interdisciplinary readings including readings from Deutsch and Coleman’s Handbook of Conflict Resolution, Theory and Practice, Roger Fisher’s Coping with International Conflict, Mnookin’s Beyond Winning and Kremenyuk’s International Negotiations, which deal with research on the wide array of potential approaches to conflict resolution. (See syllabus.) The student’s paper will be based either on 1) an in depth analysis of one of the class simulations, with a focus on the legitimacy (international law support) of any proposed solution, or 2)on the history, law, methods, practice and theory of an international dispute chosen in consultation with the professor.

Seminar: Animal Law

Law 837, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Satz

Grading Criteria: Paper

Prerequisites: None

Enrollment: 16

Description: Animal law is a burgeoning field. Over 135 law schools in North America offer courses in animal law, six specialty journals are devoted to the topic, and at least one poll indicates a career in the area is in the top seven of all desired careers. Whether it is our clothing, food, household products, companions, or back yard, our daily lives are touched by animals. Nonhuman animals are considered property under law, and a sprawling body of federal and state civil and criminal law regulates human use of them.

This seminar will explore our legal and ethical obligations to nonhuman animals, focusing on domestic animals. Selected topics may include: conceptions of animals, standing, exotic pets and public health, animals and housing, companion animal abuse, breed discrimination, working animals, factory farming, zoos, animal fighting, animal racing, animals used in T.V. and film, hunting, animal experimentation, animals and religious freedom, veterinary malpractice, and animal trusts and custody.

Seminar: Comparative Bill of Rights

Law 827, 12A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Van der Vyver

Grading Criteria: Paper

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: 16

Description: The United States of America was the first country in the world to subject the powers of administration and legislation in the structures of government to an elaborate Bill of Rights. The French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789, enacted in the same period of time, perhaps shared the honor of innovating a constitutional system of human rights protection, but as far as the range of justiciability of constitutional constraints applying to the executive and legislative branches of government are concerned, did not even come close to the American initiative.

In the first half of the twentieth century, a relatively small number of countries followed the American example of adding to their respective constitutions enforceable bills of rights. Those countries included Mexico (1917), the Soviet Union (1924), Ireland (1936), India (1947) and the Federal Republic of Germany (1949). In the second half of the twentieth century, constitutional bills of rights were added to the constitutions of almost all the countries of the world. Notable exceptions in this regard are the United Kingdom and Australia. A bill of rights was included in the Constitution of Swaziland when it became independent in 1968, but that bill of rights was suspended before it even entered into force and was eventually repealed by King Sobhuza II in April of 1973.

The seminar will consider constitution-making, comparing the American experience where the substance of human rights protection evolved “from the bottom up” with the introduction of human rights protection in new democracies “from the top down.” Special attention will be focused, comparatively, on the constitutional protection of group interests in the United States and in countries such as Nigeria, South Africa and Bulgaria; the basic norm of the American system of rights protection and that of countries such as Germany, Canada and South Africa; the principle of constitutionality as perceived in the United States and in countries such as Germany, Ethiopia, Namibia, and South Africa; application criteria applied in the United States and in countries such as France, the Netherlands, Canada, and New Zealand; the protection of economic and social rights as general principles of state policy (Ireland, India, Namibia) and as enforceable rights (Mexico, Germany, South Africa). Norms of constitutional interpretation in the United States and in South Africa, and requirements for constitutional amendment in the United States, India, Germany, Zimbabwe and Namibia, are among the other themes that will be discussed.

Students are required to submit a paper of not less than 30 pages, footnotes and a bibliography excluded, focused on a comparative analysis, with reference the legal systems of different countries, of an approved bill-of rights issue.

Seminar: Disability Law

Law 801, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Satz

Prerequisite: None

Enrollment: 16

Description: Disability affects over 50 million Americans. Everyone is vulnerable to disability, and most individuals will experience periods of disability in their lifetimes, in particular in later life. Disability law intersects with many areas of law, including the law of employment, health, benefits, insurance, administrative agencies, tort, and the federal constitution, and it involves a unique blend of statutory analysis, common law, and administrative law. Moreover, disability law is of international significance. Forty-six countries have adopted the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as a model, and, in 2006, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol were adopted by the United Nations General Assembly.

This class will explore the legal and social response of the state, private firms, and individuals to disability. The seminar will provide a comprehensive examination of federal disability law in addition to exposure to readings from other disciplines and narratives of individuals living with disabilities. Materials will be organized around selected topics, divided into three parts. The first part of the seminar will discuss the question of what constitutes disability as well as state, private firm, and individual responses to disability. The second part of the seminar will address unemployment, isolation, and other barriers to civic and social participation that endure despite the ADA and its recent amendments. Lastly, the third part of the seminar will discuss contentious social practices that may directly or indirectly impact the legal rights of individuals with disabilities, including beginning and end of life decision-making as well as the use of animals for accommodating disability.

Seminar: From Partners to Parents: Selected Issues in Family Law

Law 823, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Fineman

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Enrollment: 16

Description: This seminar will explore the trends in family law governing marriage and parenthood over the past several decades. During the latter part of the 20th century substantial changes in behavior have occurred, reflecting attitudinal shifts about women’s equality, sex and sexuality, and the importance and permanence of the marriage bond. Often identified as battlegrounds in the “cultural wars,” these are areas where the law has scrambled to adjust to evolving expectations and emerging notions of equity and equality. We will look at “traditional” marriage, challenges from those excluded from marriage, the “breakdown” of marriage, and alternatives to formal marriage, such as contract and non-marital cohabitation. Laws governing the parent-child relationship have also changed in response to or as part of the disruption of the traditional family model. The very idea of absolute parental rights has been questioned as the child has partially emerged from the cloak of family privacy and is seen as an independent rights holder in some circumstances. The seminar will also consider how new technologies and altered attitudes about assisted reproduction have presented unique challenges for the law in regard to who is or how one becomes a parent.

Seminar: Law and Literature

Law 804, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Martha Grace Duncan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Enrollment: 16

Description: This seminar will examine the portrayal of law, crime, and punishment in novels and plays. Among other works, the class will read and discuss Agamenmnon, The Crucible, Chronicle of a Death foretold, Antigone, The Scarlet Letter, and possibly Crime and Punishment. We will study these and other classics for the illumination they cast on such issues as the duty to obey, the mind of the outlaw, the female criminal, and the tension between natural and positive law.

Seminar: Law and Vulnerability

Law 833, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Fineman

Grading Criteria: Paper

Prerequisites: Paper

Enrollment: 16

Description: This seminar explores the relationship between law and vulnerability from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The course is anchored in the understanding that fundamental to our shared humanity is our shared vulnerability, which is universal and constant and inherent in the human condition. It will offer students an opportunity to engage with multiple perspectives on vulnerability, with an emphasis on law, justice, state policy and legislative ethics. While vulnerability can never be eliminated, society through its institutions confers certain "assets" or resources, such as wealth, health, education, family relationships, and marketable skills on individuals and groups. These assets give individuals "resilience" in the face of their vulnerability. This seminar will explore how as society now is structured, however, certain individuals and groups operate from positions of entrenched advantage or privilege, while others are disadvantaged in ways that seem to be invisible as we engage in law and policy discussions.

Seminar: Markets for Law

Law 824, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Prof. Ahdieh

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Enrollment: 16

Description: This seminar – which may be of particular appeal to students interested corporate and securities law, environmental law, health law, family law, and other areas characterized by a mix of federal and state law – will explore the unusual dynamic that emerges when multiple jurisdictions compete to produce legal rules. By contrast with our conventional notions of how law is created, the development of law in these settings takes place through a “market” of sorts. As one writer has described it, law is a “product” in these settings: a good to be priced, bought, and sold. Corporate law – given the centrality of jurisdictional competition to understanding and practicing it today – will serve as our case study. Through relevant readings and your papers’ analysis of jurisdictional competition in your own areas of interest, however – from environmental law to family law, health law to banking law, and criminal law to corporate/securities law – we will seek to understand the nature and the wisdom of markets for law more generally.

Seminar: Money in Politics

Law 805, 02A

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor: Prof. Kang

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Enrollment: 16

Description: The plan for the course is to explore normative concerns about the influence of money in American government and democratic politics. We will track these concerns across a number of domains, including campaign finance law, lobbying regulation, bribery, pay to play rules, and judicial elections, and explore critical responses and policy alternatives. We will draw on legal and political science scholarship, as well as currently pending court cases and contemporary accounts of money in politics. The course will

incorporate outside speakers from academia or legal practice, as feasible, as well. Grading will be based on class participation and course papers. Election Law is not a prerequisite.

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
8:00-10:15 a.m.

Civil Procedure OBC; Freer 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1C

Civil Procedure ODF; Schapiro 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Crewson 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5E

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Parrish 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1B

Contracts OBE; Pardo 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Torts OAC; Satz 8:30-10:15 a.m. 1C

 

Civil Procedure OBC; Freer 8:15-10:15 a.m. 1C

Civil Procedure ODF; Schapiro 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Crewson 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5E

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Parrish 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1B

Civil Procedure ODF; Schapiro 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Contracts OBE; Pardo 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

Torts OAC; Satz 8:30-10:15 a.m. 1C

Contracts OBE; Pardo 9:00-10:15 a.m. 1D

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Legislation/Regulation OAD; Ahdieh 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1C

Legislation/Regulation OEF; Price 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Mathews 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5E

Civil Procedure OAE; Shepherd G 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1D

Legislation/Regulation OBC; Nash 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Carroll 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Schwartz 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1B

Legislation/Regulation OAD; Ahdieh 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1C

Legislation/Regulation OEF; Price 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5F

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Mathews 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5E

Civil Procedure OAE; Shepherd G 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1D

Legislation/Regulation OBC; Nash 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1C

Civil Procedure OAE; Shepherd G 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1D

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Carroll 10:30-11:45 a.m.. 5C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Mathews 10:30-11:45 a.m. 5E

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Romig 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1C

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Schwartz 10:30-11:45 a.m. 1B

12:15-1:45 p.m.Community Activities

Contracts OAD; Pardo 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1C

Contracts OCF; Vertinsky 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1D

Community Activities

Contracts OAD; Pardo 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1C

Contracts OCF; Vertinsky 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1D

Contracts OAD; Pardo 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1C

Contracts OCF; Vertinsky 12:15-1:30 p.m. 1D

2:00-4:00 p.m.

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Kirk 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1B

Torts OBF; Vandall 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts ODE; Zwier 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

Torts OBF; Vandall 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts ODE; Zwier 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Kirk 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1B

Intro Lgl Anlys, Rsrch & Comm; Romig 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts OBF; Vandall 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1C

Torts ODE; Zwier 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1D

4:00-6:00 p.m.

Intro Lgl Anyls, Rsrch & Comm; Thornton 4:00-5:00 p.m. 5B

Intro Lgl Anyls, Rsrch & Comm; Thornton 4:00-5:00 p.m. 5B

ILARC Sections by Professor

Carroll – D4, D5, F4, F5, F6, F7

Crewson - A1, A2, A3, E1, E2, E3

Parrish - E4, E5, E6, E7, A4, A5

Mathews – B1, B2, B3, C1, C2, C3

Kirk – A6, A7, C4, C5, C6, C7

Romig – B4, B5, B6, B7, D6, D7

Schwartz – D1, D2, D3, F1, F2, F3

Thornton – AJD students

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
8:00-10:15 a.m.

Business Associations; Shepherd, G 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1E

Evidence; Seaman 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Trusts & Estates; Pennell 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5C

American Legl Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section A Daspit 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5B

International Law Van der Vyver 8:45-10:15 p.m. 5C 

Legal Profession Hughes 9:15-10:15 a.m. 1E

Remedies; Partlett 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1B

Business Associations; Shepherd, G 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1E

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; Avery 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Evidence; Seaman 8:45-10:15 a.m. 5F

Trusts & Estates; Pennell 8:15-10:15 a.m. 5C

American Legl Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section A Daspit 9:00-10:15 a.m. 5B

International Law Van der Vyver 8:45-10:15 p.m. 5C 

Legal Profession Hughes 9:15-10:15 a.m. 1E

Remedies; Partlett 8:45-10:15 a.m. 1B

 

 

EXTERNSHIP: Civil Litigation; Shalf 8:30-9:30 a.m. 5B

EXTERNSHIP: Judicial; Hirokawa 8:30-9:30 p.m. 5C

Legal Profession; Hughes 9:30-10:30 a.m. 1E

Professional Narrative; Carlson (10/16 - 11/6) 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 5F

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Administrative Law; Volokh 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

Bankruptcy; Pardo 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Federal Courts; Smith 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1B

Int'l Trade Law & Policy; 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Legal Profession; Terrell 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

 

Banking Law Elliott 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5F

Comparative & Intl Family Law; Woodhouse 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m 5A

Const'l Crim. Proc: Investigation; Cloud 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

Intellectual Property; Schaetzel 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Administrative Law; Volokh 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5C

Bankruptcy; Pardo 10:30-12:00 a.m. 5G

Federal Courts; Smith 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m 1B

Int'l Trade Law & Policy; 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Legal Profession; Terrell 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m 1E

Banking Law; Elliott 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

Comparative & Intl Family Law; Woodhouse 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5A

Const'l Crim. Proc: Investigation; Cloud 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 1E

European Union Law I; Mickevicius 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. 5D

Intellectual Property; Schaetzel 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 5B

Law & Religion: Theories, Methods, andApproaches; Allard 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 5B

12:15-1:45 p.m.Community Activities

English Legal History; Volokh 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

Family Law II; Broyde 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1B

Fundamentals of Income Taxation; Pennell 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1E

Juvenile Law; Duncan 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

Community Activities

English Legal History; Volokh 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5C

Family Law II; Broyde 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1B

Fundamentals of Income Taxation; Pennell 12:15-1:45 p.m. 1E

Juvenile Law; Duncan 12:15-1:45 p.m. 5B

International Humanitarian Law Clinic; Blank 12:00-2:00 p.m. 5E

2:00-4:00 p.m.

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I; Metzger 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1F

Human Rights Advocacy; Ludsin 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

SEM: The Role of Patents; Vertinsky 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5D

SEM: Implement US International Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5K

Advanced Legal Research (8/17-10/2); Christian 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5C

American Legal Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section B; Daspit 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5F

Capital Defender Workshop; Moore, J 3:30-5:30 p.m. Off Campus

Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I; Metzger 2:00-3:15 p.m. 1F

Cross Exam. Techniques; McCoyd 2:00-5:00 p.m. 5E

Environmental Law; Nash 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1B

Evidence; Goldfeder 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1E

Foreign & Intl Legal Research (10/5-11/23); Flick 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5C

International Criminal Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5B

SEM: Professional Negligence; Partlett 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

Access to Justice Workshop; Costa 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1F

Am Legl Writ, Analys & Rsch II; Daspit 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5B

Human Rights Advocacy; Ludsin 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5G

Law and Technology; Goldfeder 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1D

SEM: Int'l Env Law & Vulnerability; Fineman/Samandari 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5D

SEM: Law & Social Movements; Dinner 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

SEM: Products & Liability; Vandall 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5K

American Legal Writing, Analys & Rsch I Section B; Daspit 2:00-3:15 p.m. 5F

Business & Tax Legal Research (8/17-10/2); Sneed 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5G

Colloquium Series Workshop; Levine 2:00-3:00 p.m. 5K

Environmental Law; Nash 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1B

Evidence; Goldfeder 2:00-3:30 p.m. 1E

Health Law Research (10/5-11/23); Glon 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5G

International Criminal Law; Van der Vyver 2:00-3:30 p.m. 5B

Mental Health Issues in Crim. Justice Sys.; Jones 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1F

SEM: Children's Rights; Woodhouse 2:00-4:00 p.m. 5A

 

Intro to Am. Legal System LLM; Price 2:00-4:00 p.m. 1E

4:15-6:00 p.m.

and

6:15-9:45 p.m.

ADR; Armstrong 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1B

Adv. Commercial Real Estate; Minkin 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1E

Adv. Evidence; McCoyd 6:15-7:45 p.m. 5F

Adv. Legal Writing & Editing; Terrell 4:15-4:15-6:15 p.m. Tull

Criminal Pretrial Motions Practice; Grimberg, 6:15-9:15 p.m. 1F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5A

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1D

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1C

Employment Law; Weirich 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5E

Fundamentals of Innovation I; TBA 4:30-7:15 p.m. 5C

Intl Commercial Arbitration; Reetz, 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Intro to American Legal System JM; Mathews 4:00-5:45 p.m. 5E

Legislation/Regulation LLM/JM; Price 6:00-7:00 p.m. N112

Negotiations; Athans/Perry 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5B

Pretrial Litigation; McCoyd 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5F

Veterans Benefits Law; Early 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5B

ADR; Allgood 5:30-7:00 p.m. 5D

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5F

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. G114A

Doing Deals: Deal Skills; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1C

Doing Deals: General Counsel; Notte 6:15-9:15 p.m. 5B

Doing Deals: IP Transactions; Perry 4:30-7:30 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Private Equity; Crowley 4:00-6:15 p.m. B231 (Goizueta)

Employment Discrim Lab; King/Shultz 6:15-8:15 p.m. 1F

EXTERNSHIP: Criminal Defense; TBA 5:00-6:00 p.m. N111

EXTERNSHIP: Public Interest; TBA 5:00-6:00 p.m. N109

Food and Drug Law; Kitchens 4:30-6:00 p.m. 1B

Global Public Health Law; Brady 4:00-6:00 p.m. 1D

Internet Law; Nodine 6:15-8:15 p.m. 1D

Negotiations; Eldridge 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5C

Sentencing Practice; Marbutt 6:15-9:15 p.m. 1B

 

Adv. Evidence; McCoyd 6:15-7:45 p.m. 5F

Adv. Civil Trial Practice; Wellon 6:30-8:30 p.m. 1F

Analys, Rsch & Comms for non-lawyers JM; TBA 4:15-6:00 p.m. N155

Constitutional Lit; Weber 4:30-7:30 p.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5A

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. G114A

Doing Deals: Commercial Lending Transactions; Powell 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1D

Environmental Advocacy Workshop; Horder 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5D

Expert Witness Examination; Sheffield 6:15-8:15 p.m. 5E

EXTERNSHIP: Government Counsel; TBA 5:15-6:15 p.m. N109

EXTERNSHIP: Advance; TBA 6:30-7:30 p.m. N109

EXTERNSHIP: Prosecution; TBA 5:00-6:00 p.m. N111

Franchise Law; Aronson 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1B

Kids in Conflict with Law; Waldman 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1E

Labor Law; Wilson 6:30-8:30 p.m. 5B

Legislation/Regulation LLM-JM; Price 6:00-7:00 p.m. N155

Pretrial Litigation; McCoyd 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5F

SEM: Adv. International Negotiations; Zwier/Balian 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5K

Special Topics/Technology 1; TBA 4:30-7:15 p.m. 1C

Trademarks; Davis 4:15-6:15 p.m. 5B

White Collar Crime Workshop; Templer 4:15-6:15 p.m. 1F

 

ADR; Allgood 5:30-7:00 p.m. 5D

Doing Deals: Complex Restruct.; Gordon/Marsh 5:00-8:00 p.m. 5A

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5C

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1D

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1E

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5G

Doing Deals: Contract Drafting; TBA 4:15-7:15 p.m. 5K

DUI Trials; Tatum 4:15-7:15 p.m. 1F

EXTERNSHIP: Corporate Counsel; TBA 6:15-7:15 p.m. 5F

EXTERNSHIP: Small Firm; TBA 6:15-7:15 p.m. 5B

Food and Drug Law; Kitchens 4:30-6:00 p.m. 1B

Land Use; Pennington 5:00-7:00 p.m. 1C

Mental Health Issues in Criminal Law Jones 6:00-8:00 p.m. 5F

Effective August 11, 2015. Schedule and classroom locations are subject to change. Exam classroom assignments in parantheses. 

Date9:00 a.m. Exams2:00 p.m. Exams
Monday, 11/30/2015
  • Administrative Law (5F) 
  • Bankruptcy (1D/1E)
  • Federal Courts (1C)
  • Civil Procedure
    • Freer (1D/1E)
    • Shepherd (1B/1C)
    • Schapiro (5A/5B/5C//5D)
Tuesday, 12/1/2015
  • Legal Profession (Hughes) (1B/1C) 
  • Family Law II (5F)
  • Juvenile Law (5B/5C)
  • Legal Profession (Terrell) (1B/1C)
  • International Law (1E)
  • Remedies (5E/5F)
Wednesday, 12/2/2015
  • Business Associations (1C/1D)
  • Evidence (Seaman) (5A/B/E/F)
  • Trusts & Estates (1E)
  • Evidence (Goldfeder) (1C/1D)
Thursday, 12/3/2015
  • Banking Law (5B/5C)
  • Const Crim Proc: Evid (1B/1C)
  • IP (1E)
  • English Lg Hist (5E)
  • European Union (1D )
  • Contracts
    • Contracts AD (1B/1C/1D)
    • Contracts BE (1E)
    • Contracts (Vertinsky) (5EFC)
Friday, 12/4/2015
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY
Saturday, 12/5/2015
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Sunday,12/6/2015
  • READING DAY
  • READING DAY
Monday, 12/7/2015
  • Employment Law (1E)
  • Intl Comm Arbitration (5C)
  • Veterans Benefits (5D)
  • Torts 
    • Satz (1D/1E)
    • Vandall (1B/1C)
    • Zwier (5C/E/F)
Tuesday, 12/8/2015
  • Fund Income Tax (1D/1E)
  • Environmental Law (5F)
  • Intl Crim Law (5E)
  • Food & Drug Law (1B/1C)
Wednesday, 12/9/2015
  • Franchise Law (1B)
  • Labor Law (5B)
  • Trademark Law (1D)
  • Legislation/Regulation 
    • Price (1B/1C)
    • Grad- Price (1F)
    • Nash (5E/5F)
    • Ahdieh (1D/1E)
Thursday, 12/10/2015
  • Internet Law (1E)
  • Sentencing Practice (5C)
  • DD:Private Equity (1B)
Friday, 12/11/2015
  • MAKE-UP DAY
  • MAKE-UP DAY

Course availability is subject to change.

679. Access to Justice: Getting into the Courtroom

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Costa, Frank J.

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Classroom exercises, court performance, periodic reaction papers

Description: Access to Justice provides second and third year law students the unique opportunity to see how justice is actually administered in criminal cases in actual Georgia Courts and to develop their courtroom oral advocacy skills in a real-world setting. We will examine, through readings and classroom discussion, the ways in which poor and underserved populations access justice within the framework of the traditional criminal justice system, and the increasing role of accountability courts for defendants suffering with drug, alcohol or mental health afflictions. But this class extends far beyond the conventional classroom in three significant ways. First, students will take multiple off-campus trips, including touring the local jail facility and attending actual court sessions to observe criminal case proceedings. Second, students will receive real recent criminal case warrants and police reports and will conduct interviews with actual defendants (either in or out of custody) and participate in mock classroom hearings on these cases. Lastly, where possible, students will represent their clients in actual court proceedings (bond hearings, preliminary hearings, and even possibly motions and trials). Students should plan to be in court one weekday morning every other week throughout the semester, though multiple weekday mornings options will be available each week to accommodate individual student schedules. Students will be graded primarily on their performance in both classroom and courtroom hearings and their participation in classroom discussion, and secondarily on periodic papers analyzing their experiences.

Please note: any students who have previously or are currently interning or doing a field placement with the State Court Division of the Law Office of the DeKalb County Public Defender will be ineligible for this course.  Additionally, this course cannot be taken concurrently with an internship or field placement in the DeKalb County Solicitors or District Attorney’s Office as it would cause a professional conflict.

701. Administrative Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Volokh, Alexander

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: Much of the law we live under is made and then applied by administrative agencies. Administrative law is a study of how this law is made and then applied. Specific topics include the constitutional standards under which legislative and judicial power is transferred to agencies; the procedures that control agency lawmaking and adjudication, and the availability and scope of judicial review of agency action.

847. Advanced Civil Trial Practice, Gender Discrimination

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Wellon, Robert G.

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Class Work

Description: Designed to build on the litigation techniques and skills first encountered in the Trial Techniques Program. Using a simulated case file in an employment case, the class will help develop the skills, strategies and tactics necessary to be effective courtroom advocates. The course will employ lecture, demonstrations, movie and video-tape simulations as well as regular participation by the students and constructive criticism and helpful hints from the course instructors, who are all very experienced litigators and judges. Invited guests who litigate regularly in this area of practice will also participate. Courtroom technology and visual aids will also be explored. The course will conclude with student teams conducting a trial in a real courtroom setting, which is now planned for November 17th where participation is mandatory.

617A. Advanced Commercial Real Estate

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Minkin, David

Prerequisite: Real Estate Finance (recommended)

Grading Criteria: Take-Home Exam and Classwork

Description: What does a commercial real estate attorney really do every day? What does he or she think about and what is the relationship between the attorney and his or her client? What are the attorney’s responsibilities to accomplish the client’s goals? This course will explore those questions and related issues in the context of sophisticated commercial real estate transactions. During the course the students will be introduced to many of the essential elements of commercial real estate, including development concepts, purchase and sale of real estate, equity financing, debt financing, leasing, operational issues with large retail developments, and financial restructuring issues. Course materials will include Harvard Business School cases applicable to commercial real estate issues, form documentation applicable to many areas of commercial real estate, and relevant articles.

632A. Advanced Evidence

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): McCoyd, Matthew Joseph

Prerequisite: Evidence

Grading Criteria: Critiqued classroom exercises and a written final exam

Description: The objective of this course is to explore and develop selected complex evidentiary issues that are not covered by the basic Evidence course. The objective will be accomplished through the use of both lecture and simulations that present these issues in the context of complex civil and criminal litigation scenarios. While learning to analyze sophisticated evidentiary issues, students will also be able to expand the basic trial skills they acquired in Trial Advocacy. The faculty will lead participants through the quagmire of the Federal Rules of Evidence. This course offers participants the necessary skills to work through evidentiary issues with greater accuracy and confidence; ensure baseline relevancy issues are met, to affirm that probative value outweighs unfair prejudice; analyze quickly whether character evidence, including prior bad acts, is admissible; describe when habit and custom evidence may be admitted; utilize appropriate impeachment objections after analyzing the rules regarding bias, capacity and prior inconsistent statements; and, outline an analytical scheme for hearsay objections and the exceptions.

The course is designed for law students who have at the minimum taken a basic course in evidence.

657. Advanced Legal Research

ACCELERATED CLASS: August 17, 2015 – September 28, 2015

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Christian, Elizabeth

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Description: This course is an examination of the legal research methods and sources beyond the basics taught during the first year of law school. Through a mixture of lectures and practical applications with in-class exercises and a final research project, students will become familiar with topics such as case, statute & regulatory research, aids for the practitioner and legislative history research. This practical, skills-based course is designed to help prepare students for practice or future study. This new half-semester format makes class time especially important. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Missing more than one class period may jeopardize a student’s academic standing and will negatively affect the course grade.

648. Advanced Legal Writing & Editing

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Terrell, Timothy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Pass/Fail

Description: The basic content of the course is reflected in its required text: S. Armstrong & T. Terrell, Thinking Like a Writer: A Lawyer’s Guide to Writing and Editing (PLI 3d ed., 2008). A frequent misconception about this course is that it is merely an extension of your experience in LWRAP. It is not. It will instead often challenge you to reconsider approaches to writing guidance that you have may previously encountered.

The course consists of two components. First, everyone enrolled will meet once a week on Monday afternoon for 1 ½ hours, and that time will be consumed by lecture and review of numerous writing examples at every level of a document – from overall structure to sentences and word choice. Second, all students will be assigned to a small-group discussion section, administered by a “teaching assistant” who is a third-year who took this course last year. Those sessions will meet once a week for an hour, during which the course’s materials, and additional examples, will be discussed, and editing exercises will be assigned.

Although this is a “writing” course, it is unusual in that its emphasis will be on “editing” rather than original drafting. One of the keys to becoming a good writer is understanding how readers (for purposes of this course, that means you) react to documents written by others. That experience then yields important insights regarding the defects in one’s own prose, and how to cure them efficiently. To this end, the course will begin with some examination of deeper theories of communication, which will in turn allow the course to focus on fundamental writing “principles” rather than narrower “rules” or “tips.” The course will also analyze writing challenges from the “top down:” We will begin with issues of overall “macro” structure and organization and work down toward “micro” details.

605. Alternative Dispute Resolution

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Allgood, John or Armstrong, Phillip

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Take Home (Armstrong) Final Exam (Allgood)

Description: This course will explore Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) with an emphasis on mediation. Course objectives are: 1) to develop both a theoretical and a practical understanding of available options and strategies for using them effectively in a legal practice; 2) to understand the ethical and legal implications of ADR; and 3) to develop a proficiency in dispute resolution processes other than litigation, including direct negotiation, mediation, and arbitration.

560. American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research I

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Daspit, Nancy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: An introduction to law and sources of law, legal bibliography and research techniques and strategies, the analysis of problems in legal terms, the writing of an office memorandum of law.

560. American Legal Writing, Analysis & Research II

NOTE: OPEN ONLY FOR FOREIGN-EDUCATED LLM STUDENTS

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Daspit, Nancy

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper

Description: The objective of this course is to explore and develop American legal writing, analysis and research areas that are not covered by the introduction course.

590. Analysis, Researc,h and Communications for Non-Lawyers (JM)

Credits:2 hours

Instructor(s): Daspit, Nancy and Glon, Christina

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Regular Assignments / Final Project

Description: This course will provide an introduction to legal analysis, research and effective legal writing and is a core component of our JM program. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of legal analysis and the structure of legal information. Students will learn how to navigate multiple legal resources to discover legal authority appropriate for different types of legal analysis and communications. Students will learn the concepts of effective legal analysis and will develop the skills necessary to produce persuasive arguments as well as informative legal explanations.

604. Banking Law

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Elliott, A. J.

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This course will examine the nature, content and scope of the rules regulating the banking industry in light of economic and social purposes. The course will also look briefly at the history of the U. S. banking industry and will emphasize the economic and business aspects of the individual bank and of the industry as a whole.

716. Bankruptcy

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Pardo, Rafael

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: An introduction to the law of bankruptcy. Covers issues relating to eligibility for bankruptcy; commencement of a bankruptcy case; administration of the bankruptcy estate; automatic stay and relief; use, sale or lease of property of the estate; assumption and rejection of executory contracts and leases; avoidance actions, including preference and fraudulent transfer litigation; appointment of trustees and examiners; and confirmation of a Chapter 11 plan. This course is a general survey course reviewing the basics of Chapter 7 liquidations, Chapter 13 wage-earner reorganizations and Chapter 11 business reorganizations.

635D. Barton Appeal for Youth Clinic

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Reba, Stephen

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: None (based on individual student)

Description: Students in the Appeal for Youth Clinic provide holistic appellate representation of youthful offenders in the juvenile and criminal justice systems. By increasing the number of appeals from adjudications of delinquency, we hope to end the unwritten policies and practices that result in youths being committed to juvenile detention facilities. Similarly, by providing post-conviction representation to youths who were tried and convicted as adults, we hope to decrease the number of youthful offenders who languish in Georgia's prisons.

635C.Barton Child Law and Policy Clinic

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Carter, Melissa D.

Prerequisite: Students must have taken or be concurrently enrolled in the two-credit class, Child Welfare Law & Policy. This requirement may be waived for students with demonstrable prior experience in child advocacy, including the Emory Summer Child Advocacy Program.

Grading Criteria: None (based on individual student)

Description: The Barton Clinic is an in-house legal policy clinic dedicated to providing research, training, and support to the public, the child advocacy community, and the legislature in Georgia. Students work on issues before the state legislature, complete research for publication, participate in local and statewide advocacy events, and help inform the discussion on child welfare issues with their own ideas or projects. Approximately 4-8 law and other graduate students are selected each semester to participate in the clinic.

Applications are accepted prior to pre-registration (watch for notices of the application deadline). Students must submit a resume, a statement of interest, list of 2 references, the name of his/her LWRAP Instructor, an unofficial transcript, and a writing sample.

Detailed course information is on the Clinic web site, http://www.childwelfare.net »

762. Business and Tax Legal Research

ACCELERATED CLASS: August 17, 2015 – September 28, 2015

Credit: 1 Hour

Instructor(s): Sneed, Thomas

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Research Problems and Research Project

Description: The purpose of Business and Tax Legal Research is to provide students with an introduction to business and tax related materials and advanced training on the finding and utilization of these materials for legal research purposes. Topics covered will include business forms, business filings and SEC research, and primary and secondary sources for tax issues.

This will be a one credit, graded course meeting on an accelerated schedule for the first seven weeks of the semester. Because student participation is essential for the learning experience in this course, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Failure to attend will affect the course grade.

500X. Business Associations

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Shepherd, George

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: A study of basic concepts in agency, partnership (general and limited), and corporation law. Topics include choice of business form, formation, organization, financing, and dissolution, as well as the fundamental rights and responsibilities of, and the allocation of power between, the business entity, its owners, management, and other stakeholders. The course also considers the special needs of closely held enterprises, basic issues in corporate finance, and the impact of federal and state laws and regulations governing the formation, management, financing, and dissolution of business enterprises.

658. Capital Defender Workshop

NOTE: Interested students must submit a letter of interest & resume to Josh Moore, Office of the Georgia Capital Defender jmoore@gacapdef.gov »

NOTE: THIS WORKSHOP WILL REQUIRE A YEAR-LONG (two semester) COMMITMENT

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Moore, Josh

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Participation

Description: This is a three hour clinical course taught in partnership with the Office of the Georgia Capital Defender, the new state agency responsible for representing all indigent defendants statewide in capital cases at trial and on direct appeal. Second and third year law students from Emory, Georgia State, UGA, and Mercer will assist Capital Defender attorneys in all aspects of preparing their clients’ cases for trial. Students will become involved in fact investigations, witness interviewing, legal research and drafting, and general preparations for trials and sentencing hearings. The great opportunity students have in this clinic—as opposed to clinics that focus on the appeal and post-conviction stages—is to be involved in the effort to save lives on the front end, on “making the case for life.” That means students will focus at least as much on mitigation, fact investigation, and interpersonal skills as on death penalty law and advocacy skills.

635. Child Welfare Law and Policy

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Carter, Melissa

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Grading Criteria: Attendance, court visit, participation, written and oral assignments

Description: This course will explore the various factors that shape public policy and perception concerning abused and neglected children, including: the constitutional, statutory, and regulatory framework for child protection; varying disciplinary perspectives of professionals working on these issues; and the role and responsibilities of the courts, public agencies and non-governmental organizations in addressing the needs of children and families. Through a practice-focused study, students will examine the evolution of the child protection system, including the emergence of the juvenile court, and critical issues such as legal representation of children, impact litigation and limits on governmental authority. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of legal, legislative, and policy measures as a response to child abuse and neglect and to appreciate the roles of various disciplines in the collaborative field of child advocacy. Through lecture, discussion, analytical writing and skills-based exercises, including legislative drafting and oral advocacy assignments, students will develop a fuller understanding of this specialized area of the law and the companion skills necessary to be an effective advocate.

860A. Colloquium Series Workshop

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Levine, Kay L

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Class Work

Description: Would you like a close-up look at the world of legal scholarship and the exchange of scholarly ideas? Are you seeking more engagement with the Emory Law faculty outside of the traditional classroom setting? Do you want to become a stronger writer? Have you ever thought you might want to become a law professor? If so, consider applying to the Colloquium Series Workshop (CSW). Components of CSW Students who participate in this two unit workshop attend two meetings each week: the weekly faculty colloquium, which meets on Wednesdays over the lunch hour (and includes lunch) and a one-hour class session run by Professor Kay Levine, on Thursday afternoons. During each of these one hour sessions, students discuss the colloquium work as a piece of scholarship (and as piece of persuasive writing), critique the author's presentation, and review materials relating to the production of scholarship and the legal academic job market. In advance of the weekly meeting, students write short reaction papers to each colloquium piece. The CSW will be graded on a pass/fail basis, but with high attendance and participation standards set for what constitutes a passing grade. Do not apply for this class if you have other commitments during the lunch hour on Wednesdays (even only sporadic). Enrollment Students enroll in the CSW in accordance with the same procedures used for seminars (advance application during the pre-selection process). However, enrollment is limited to seven students each semester, instead of the usual 15. On the pre-selection form please indicate the basis of your interest in the CSW and your prior experience with scholarship in an academic setting (law or otherwise).

633A. Comparative and International Family Law

Credits: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Paper and In-Class Exercises

Description: Globalization has affected family law in many different ways. Families are far more mobile, and family law cases are far more likely to cross political and cultural boundaries and to involve the laws of several countries. International conventions and human rights instruments play a growing role in the practice and study of family law. Family law is a template for the organization of cultures and societies. By exploring how other nations address issues such as creation and dissolution of intimate relationships, the role of religious and civil authorities in setting family norms, policies on procreation and reproductive technology, women’s and children’s rights and the allocation of rights and responsibilities for dependent family members, we acquire a fuller understanding of our own norms and traditions. This course will involve in-class exercises designed to spotlight critical family law issues in different regions of the world and explore the diversity of approaches to resolving them.

622A. Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Investigations

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Cloud, Morgan

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam Class Participation

Description: This course examines the constitutional rules governing criminal investigations, including searches and seizures, the interrogation of witnesses and suspects, and the roles played by prosecutors and defense attorneys during the investigative stages of criminal cases. The course studies the current constitutional rules governing these essential police practices, the development of these rules, and the relevant but conflicting policy arguments favoring efficient law enforcement and individual liberty that arise in these cases.

675. Constitutional Litigation

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Weber Jr., Gerald R

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: An exploration of the substantive, ethical and strategic issues involved in litigating civil rights actions. This course will allow students to both learn basic principles of governmental liability/defenses and apply their knowledge of torts, constitutional law and civil procedure in a litigation setting.

959. Courtroom Persuasion/Drama I

Credits: 1 hour

Instructor(s): Metzger, Janet

Prerequisite: Evidence & Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Class work

Description: This course introduces students to basic acting, directing and writing tools a lawyer needs to motivate and persuade jurors, and applies these tools to courtroom performance. Using lectures, exercises, readings, individual performance and video playback, the course helps students develop concentration, observation skills, storytelling, spontaneity, and physical and vocal technique. Students also gain practical experience applying these tools to the presentation of openings and closings as well as questioning witnesses and jurors.

622X. Criminal Procedure Motions Practice Workshops

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Grimberg, Steven

Prerequisite: Completion or co-requisite of the Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Investigations course.

Grading Criteria: In-class oral advocacy assignments, written advocacy assignments, and classroom participation.

Description: This workshop will provide practical skills training in the area of pre-trial criminal litigation for a small number of students. Class will meet once a week for approximately 2.5 hours, and will generally consist of each student performing an oral advocacy assignment. In addition, written advocacy assignments will be due from time to time. The emphasis of the class will be on building off of the students' substantive knowledge of criminal procedure by learning how it is applied to "real world" pre-trial criminal litigation.

767. Cross Examination Techniques

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): McCoyd, Matthew

Prerequisite: Evidence and Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Course work; in-classroom exercises

Description: This course is designed to conduct an exhaustive examination of the science and art of cross examination with extensive in class exploration and performance of advanced cross examination techniques.

Directed research is an independent scholarly project of your own design, meant to lead to the production of an original work of scholarship. Once you have secured a faculty advisor and have defined your project, you should download the directed research form (see below). In this form, indicate whether you are seeking one unit (a 15 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.) or two units (a 30 page paper, double spaced, exclusive of endnotes, tables, appendices, etc.).

Complete information and the application form are available on the Students-Only web page »

659M. Doing Deals: Commercial Lending Transactions

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Powell, Catherine

Prerequisite: Business Associations, Contract Drafting, and Deal Skills (concurrent not okay)

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Description: This Course is designed to give the student an opportunity to (i) explore in depth a variety of secured transactions, recognizing the contrast to unsecured transactions, and the Credit(s)ors rights, remedies and benefits thereunder, (ii) understand the nature and corresponding requirements of secured transactions, including knowledge of, and familiarity with applicable regulations, statutes and rules, and (iii) engage, as counsel, in the representation of a “secured Credit(s)or” or “borrower”, in an actual secured transaction from beginning to end (the “Secured Transaction”) throughout the semester.

659P. Doing Deals: Complex Restructurings and Distressed Acquisitions in Chapter 11

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Gordon, David; Marsh, Gary

Prerequisite: Bankruptcy and Contract Drafting Prerequisite-Students seeking Credit(s) for a Capstone Class: Bankruptcy, Contract Drafting and Deal Skills. Students will complete some advanced exercises during the course.

Grading Criteria: Class participation (10-20%), in-class presentations (20-30%), out-of-class projects (transaction documents, memos, legal briefs, etc.) (20-30%), final pleadings and argument for the sale hearing (20-30%).

Description: This course will take students down the path of a complicated corporate restructuring and/or sale. During class time, students will learn the key features of a modern corporate restructuring and distressed sale, using a hypothetical company for illustrations. Students will also be asked to prepare and present in class one or more summaries/presentations regarding hot topics in the bankruptcy and restructuring world. Outside of class, students will assume the roles of various parties to the restructuring, such as debtor, lenders, key suppliers, key customers, private equity sponsor, and the like. The students will be asked by their “clients” (the instructors) to negotiate transaction terms and to draft definitive documents for various parts of the restructuring. The students will also be asked to prepare various bankruptcy-related transactional documents and pleadings, leading to a contested, bankruptcy court sale of the hypothetical company at the end of the course.

659A. Doing Deals: Contract Drafting

Credit: 3 Hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (highly recommended as prerequisite)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: This course teaches students the principles of drafting commercial agreements. Although the course will be of particular interest to students pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

In this course, students will learn how transactional lawyers translate the business deal into contract provisions, as well as techniques for minimizing ambiguity and drafting with clarity. Through a combination of lecture, hands-on drafting exercises, and extensive homework assignments, students will learn about different types of contracts, other documents used in commercial transactions, and the drafting problems the contracts and documents present. The course will also focus on how a drafter can add value to a deal by finding, analyzing, and resolving business issues.

The grade will be based on specific homework assignments and class participation.

659B. Doing Deals: Deal Skills

Credits: 3 hours

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay); Contract Drafting (concurrent NOT okay)

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: Deal Skills will introduce students to business and legal issues common to commercial transactions, whether a multi-billion dollar M&A deal, a license agreement, a commercial real estate transaction, or a financing transaction. Among the topics to be covered are the lawyer's role as the translator of the business deal into contract concepts, client interviewing and communication, negotiation, due diligence, corporate actions and records, indemnities, transaction management, closings, and ethical issues. The course will be conducted through workshop exercises, in-class role-plays, and lectures and will also include out-of-class due diligence, negotiation and other exercises.

659N. Doing Deals: Intellectual Property Transactions

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Lytle, Courtney

Prerequisite: Contract Drafting and Deal Skills

Grading Criteria: Exercises, Class Participation, Final Paper/Presentation

Description: This course is designed to offer students with an interest in intellectual property the opportunity to explore a limited number of current and cutting edge intellectual property topics in depth and to experience first-hand how these legal concepts would manifest in a transactional practice setting. Students will complete a variety of in-class and homework assignments typical of those encountered in a transactional IP practice, from contract negotiation and drafting to strategic analysis and client interaction. - The course is intended for students with an interest in this subject area; no specific prior IP courses are required, but if a student has not taken any other IP offerings, please contact the instructor (clytle@emory.edu) for suggestions of materials to review over the summer. Grading is a combination of small projects, class participation, and a final paper/presentation. There is no exam. Students taking this course as a Capstone Course will complete some additional requirements over the course of the semester. Because of the nature of this course, regular attendance is mandatory.

659D. Doing Deals: Private Equity

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Crowley, Kevin; Furman, Kathryn

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting, Deal Skills, Corporate Finance, Accounting in Action or Analytical Methods

Grading Criteria: Course Work

Description: The course is designed as a workshop in which law students and business students will work together to structure and negotiate varying aspects of a private equity deal, from the initial term sheet stages, through execution of the purchase agreement, to completion of the financing and closing. Private equity deals that are economically justified, sometimes fail in the transaction negotiation and documentation phase. This course will seek to provide students with the tools necessary to tackle and resolve difficult deal issues and complete successful deals. Students will be divided into teams of lawyers and business people to review, consider and negotiate actual transaction documents. The issues presented will include often-contested key economic and legal deal terms, as well as common ethical dilemmas.

659F. Doing Deals: The General Counsel in Negotiated Transactions

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): TBA

Prerequisite: Business Associations (concurrent NOT okay), Contract Drafting (concurrent NOT okay) Prerequisite-Students seeking Credit(s) for a Capstone Class: Business Associations, Contract Drafting and Deal Skills (concurrent NOT okay). Students will complete some advanced exercises during the course.

Grading Criteria: Course work

Description: In this course, students will develop transactional skills, with emphasis on possible differences in roles of in-house counsel and outside counsel in the context of a hypothetical transaction that will be focal point of the entire semester. The class will be divided between the lawyers representing the buyer and the lawyers representing the seller. Students will interview the Professor (client) throughout the semester and develop goals, strategies, and documents that will meet the needs of the client. The semester will include the drafting and negotiation of a confidentiality agreement, letter of intent, development and review of a due diligence data room and will culminate in the drafting and negotiation of a final purchase agreement.

745. DUI Trials

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Tatum, Deborah M.

Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Techniques

Grading Criteria: Participation and Final Trial Simulation

Description: One of the most complicated and technical cases to try in criminal law is a DUI charge. Learning how to present or defend a DUI can equip a new litigator with techniques that will benefit students seeking practice in all areas of criminal litigation. Students will review DUI statutes and case law and prepare simulation cases for motions and trial. Opening arguments, direct, cross, and closing argument will be discussed and practiced. Introduction of scientific evidence, expert testimony, and preparing your witness for trial will be explored. Motions will be prepared and decided. Students will prepare and present their final case in a trial setting at the end of the semester.

669X. Employment Discrimination Lab

Credits: 2 hour

Instructor(s): King, Carlton & Shultz, Chad

Prerequisite: Employment Discrimination (concurrent okay)

Grading Criteria: Coursework

Description: The class will work though an employment law case from meeting the client to a mock jury trial. The students will be divided into 2 law firms. One firm represents the Plaintiff and the other firm represents the Defendant. The classes are lead by Chad Shultz and Carlton King., but this is an interactive class that encourages group discussion and student participation. The written assignments will include a demand letter (Plaintiff’s firm), a response to the demand letter (defense); summary judgment brief and reply (simplified and limited to no more than 8 pages). Each student will also participate in deposing a witness, argue the motion for summary judgment, and play a role in the trial of the case. This is a hands-on class that will allow you prosecute and defend an employment case from start to finish.

668. Employment Law

Credits: 2 hours

Instructor(s): Weirich, Geoff

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: This two-hour course will cover many of the major legal aspects of the employment relationship not treated in Labor Law. We will examine legal principles applicable to the hiring process, the key terms and conditions of employment (including wages, hours, employee benefits, and workplace conduct), employment discrimination (a brief survey, not intended as a substitute for the separate course on that subject), occupational safety and health, employment termination (including termination for cause and through force reduction), and post-employment issues (restrictive covenants and trade secrets, unemployment insurance, and post-employment benefits).

694. English Legal History

Credits: 3 hours

Instructor(s): Volokh, Alexander

Prerequisite: None

Grading Criteria: Exam

Description: English legal history began around the year 600, when King Aethelberht of Kent promulgated his famous legal code: "If a person strikes off a thumb, 20 shillings. If a thumbnail becomes off, let him pay 3 shillings. If a person strikes off a forefinger, let him pay 9 shillings. If a person strikes off a middle finger, let him pay 4 shillings. . . ." From Aethelberht to modern-day workers compensation codes (in Georgia, $60,000 for the loss of a hand) is but a brief step. But in between, we get to cover Domesday Book, Magna Carta, the dissolution of the monasteries, the Instrument of Government, and the Bill of Rights.

More precisely: this course is a survey of the law o