Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal

Opening Remarks
Robert Schapiro Dean, Emory University School of Law, and Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law.

I would like to welcome all of you to this wonderful event. Special thanks go to our sponsors; the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal advisory board, especially alumni advisor Keith Shapiro; Emory Law faculty, especially Jim Elliott and Charles Shanor; and faculty advisor and Robert T. Thompson Professor of Law, Rafael Pardo. I especially want to thank the students of the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal, in particular outgoing Editor-in-Chief Gene Goldmintz and incoming Editor-in-Chief Armstead Lewis. Finally, thank you to the distinguished members of the bench and bar, who attend and support our unique bankruptcy program.

The bankruptcy program is truly a signature strength of Emory Law School. The bankruptcy curriculum integrates theory and practice, and its extraordinary strength results from the close ties among outstanding scholars, practicing lawyers, and bankruptcy judges. Emory’s bankruptcy program is a model of all that is best in legal education and in the legal profession. Of course, the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal lies at the heart of this program.

This year was a great year for Emory’s bankruptcy program. In February, the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal Symposium featured panels on the dischargeability of student loans, highlighting the path-breaking scholarship of Professor Pardo, and on the healthcare industry in the wake of the Affordable Care Act. Most remarkably, the Symposium went off without a hitch, despite a weather delay caused by a half-inch of snow. The Journal also gained judicial recognition this year. Two weeks ago, the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal was cited by the Fourth Circuit in a dissenting opinion. 1Moses v. CashCall, Inc., 781 F.3d 63, 76–77 (4th Cir. 2015) (Niemeyer, J., writing separately and dissenting from the judgment in Part II.B) (citing Kent L. Richland, Stern v. Marshall: A Dead End Marathon?, 28 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 393, 413 (2012)). In November, the Journal was also cited by the Seventh Circuit. 2State Bank of Toulon v. Covey (In re Duckworth), 776 F.3d 453, 458 (7th Cir. 2014) (citing Jonathan C. Lipson, Secrets and Liens: The End of Notice in Commercial Finance Law, 21 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 421, 450–51 (2005)).

Outstanding student achievements also deserve recognition. Congratulations to Leia Clement, who was named the 2015 Distinguished Law Student of the American College of Bankruptcy for the Eleventh Circuit, and congratulations to Gene Goldmintz, who was named the Southeastern Bankruptcy Law Institute Distinguished Law Student.

Tonight, it is our honor to honor our longtime friend and colleague, Marjorie Girth. Professor Girth long has been a leader on the topics of bankruptcy and access to justice more broadly. Professor Girth made her mark first in New York, teaching at SUNY Buffalo Law School and leading many projects for the New York State Bar Association and the American Bar Association.

Later, Professor Girth came to Atlanta, continuing her great work both on bankruptcy and on access to justice. She taught at Emory Law, served as dean and taught at Georgia State’s College of Law, and worked closely with the Supreme Court on a variety of issues, including access to justice.

We have indeed much to celebrate this evening and we should look forward to a wonderful night.

Footnotes

Dean, Emory University School of Law, and Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law.

1Moses v. CashCall, Inc., 781 F.3d 63, 76–77 (4th Cir. 2015) (Niemeyer, J., writing separately and dissenting from the judgment in Part II.B) (citing Kent L. Richland, Stern v. Marshall: A Dead End Marathon?, 28 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 393, 413 (2012)).

2State Bank of Toulon v. Covey (In re Duckworth), 776 F.3d 453, 458 (7th Cir. 2014) (citing Jonathan C. Lipson, Secrets and Liens: The End of Notice in Commercial Finance Law, 21 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 421, 450–51 (2005)).