Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal

Opening Remarks
Robert A. Schapiro Dean, Emory University School of Law and Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law.

It is my great pleasure to welcome all of you to this wonderful evening. The Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal Banquet is a highlight of the year for the Law School. I would like to offer special thanks to the sponsors of this marvelous event; to the Advisory Board of the Journal, especially Alumni Advisor Keith Shapiro; Keith J. Shapiro is the Vice President of Greenberg Traurig. He is also the Chairman of the Chicago office, National Chairman of Strategic Recruitment, and Co-Chair of the firm’s Business Reorganization & Financial Restructuring Practice. He serves as the EBDJ’s Alumni Advisor. and to the Faculty Advisors, Professors Jim Elliott and Charlie Shanor and our resident bankruptcy expert, Rafael Pardo, the Robert T. Thompson Professor of Law. I am particularly grateful to the outstanding students of the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal and especially to outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Armie Lewis, and to incoming Editor-in-Chief, Jake Jumbeck. It is these superb students who provide the effort and inspiration for the Journal and this banquet. I would like to thank, as well, the distinguished members of the bench and bar who attend this event, and who provide exceptional support for our unique bankruptcy program throughout the year.

The bankruptcy program is truly a signature strength of Emory Law School. The program exemplifies the school’s commitment to offering a curriculum that integrates theory and practice and to forging close ties among outstanding scholars, practitioners, and judges. In this way, Emory Law’s bankruptcy program is a model of all that is best in legal education and in the legal profession.

Of course, the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal lies at the heart of the bankruptcy program. This year was another great year for the study of bankruptcy at Emory Law and for the EBDJ. Once again, the EBDJ Symposium provided valuable insight on timely topics. The corporate panel addressed the ABI Commission’s Report on the Reform of Chapter 11, with special focus on small and medium businesses, sales of assets, financing, and plans. The consumer panel focused on recent developments in bankruptcy regulation, including mortgage servicing rules, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, and the Consumer Financial Protection Board. As in previous years, the event brought together outstanding experts to illuminate vital topics. Happily, unlike last year, it did not snow.

The EBDJ continues to be an extraordinary influential voice, often relied on by practitioners and judges. The EBDJ is cited by courts all over the land. Just last week, for example, the Journal was cited by United States District Court for the Western District of Michigan. 1Indian Harbor Ins. v. Zucker, 553 B.R. 633, 640 (W.D. Mich. 2016) (citing Michael D. Sousa, Making Sense of the Bramble-Filled Thicket: The “Insured vs. Insured” Exclusion in the Bankruptcy Context, 23 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 365, 370–71, 404 (2007)). The week before it was the District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. 2Colfin Bulls Fundings A, LLC v. Paloian (In re Dvorkin Holdings, LLC), 547 B.R. 880, 892 (N.D. Ill. 2016) (citing Scott C. Shelley & Solomon J. Noh, Show Me the Money: Another Look at Postpetition Interest in Solvent Debtor Chapter 11 Cases, 24 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 361, 361 (2008)).

This evening, it is our privilege to honor a legend in bankruptcy, Professor Grant W. Newton. He will receive a full introduction later. For now, I will merely mention some highlights. Professor Newton received his undergraduate degree nearby from the University of North Alabama and his masters degree from the University of Alabama. He then ventured forth with stops in New York, Connecticut, California, and now Oregon. He was a long time professor at Pepperdine and the author of leading books and articles in the field. His extraordinarily distinguished career has included serving as Executive Director of the Association of Insolvency and Restructuring Advisors. Linking the academy and the bar, he was central to creating a variety of certificates and designations, including the Certified Insolvency and Reorganization Accountant (“CIRA”) and the Certification in Distressed Business Valuation (“CDBV”) designations. He also serves as a Trustee of Oklahoma Christian University.

Professor Newton represents the ideal that we strive for: bringing together the academy, the bench, and the bar, furthering the highest ideals of the legal profession. We are very pleased to welcome him back to Atlanta.

We have indeed much to celebrate this evening, and we look forward to a wonderful night.

Footnotes

Dean, Emory University School of Law and Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law.

Keith J. Shapiro is the Vice President of Greenberg Traurig. He is also the Chairman of the Chicago office, National Chairman of Strategic Recruitment, and Co-Chair of the firm’s Business Reorganization & Financial Restructuring Practice. He serves as the EBDJ’s Alumni Advisor.

1Indian Harbor Ins. v. Zucker, 553 B.R. 633, 640 (W.D. Mich. 2016) (citing Michael D. Sousa, Making Sense of the Bramble-Filled Thicket: The “Insured vs. Insured” Exclusion in the Bankruptcy Context, 23 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 365, 370–71, 404 (2007)).

2Colfin Bulls Fundings A, LLC v. Paloian (In re Dvorkin Holdings, LLC), 547 B.R. 880, 892 (N.D. Ill. 2016) (citing Scott C. Shelley & Solomon J. Noh, Show Me the Money: Another Look at Postpetition Interest in Solvent Debtor Chapter 11 Cases, 24 Emory Bankr. Dev. J. 361, 361 (2008)).