Emory International Law Review

Dedication
The Editorial Board

Last fall, the Emory International Law Review lost a great advisor and friend. We, the staff of EILR, mourn the passing of Professor David J. Bederman, and it is with extremely heavy hearts that we write to remember him.

Professor Bederman, the K.H. Gyr Professor in Private International Law at Emory, will always be known as a masterful and prolific scholar of International, Admiralty, and U.S. Constitutional Law, as an elite and successful litigator, and even as an entrepreneur in the private sector. He holds a special place in our hearts, though, as a teacher and academic advisor.

In the classroom here at Emory University School of Law, he was always energetic, entertaining, and patient, even during the final years of his illness. He taught us not only the black letter international law concepts we would need in our careers and for our responsibilities on this Review, but also taught us to love the subject—its principles, peculiarities, and paradoxes alike. More than 4,000 students had the great pleasure of taking his courses here. He deservedly won both the Ben Johnson Teaching Prize from the Law School and the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award from the University for his efforts.

Professor Bederman also logged twenty years as a faculty advisor of this journal, serving as wise counsel to each editorial board, shepherding a handful of second-year students each year through the comment-writing process, and advocating for the journal to the international legal community. In addition to its function as a publication for the most important legal discussions of the day, Professor Bederman never lost sight of the pedagogical function of the Review for us, the student editors. He penned the introduction to our 25th volume, where he wrote: “[W]e tend to ignore the true worth of student law reviews (especially those with an international or transnational focus): the scholarly connoisseurship that comes with the editing process and the development of young cohorts of international lawyers through the writing of Notes and Comments.” 1David J. Bederman, 25 Years of Student Scholarship and Editorship for the Emory International Law Review, 25 Emory Int’l L. Rev. 1, 2 (2011). This fierce advocacy of our efforts made him an invaluable mentor for our publication.

Beyond his myriad achievements as a professor, advisor, litigator, and businessman, Professor Bederman will be remembered for his personality. Professor John Witte, Jr., in his eulogy of Professor Bederman, remembered his colleague as

constantly and consummately elegant and polite, modest and measured, loyal and faithful, bold and brave. With David there were no empty words or wasted motion, no self-glory or self-pity, no bathos or pathos. Even in the face of the ample adversity he faced in his later years, he was always kind and concerned for others, he was always steady, sure, determined, and utterly fearless. 2John Witte, Jr., Jonas Robitscher Professor of Law & Alonzo L. McDonald Distinguished Professor, In Memory of David J. Bederman (Dec. 12, 2011) (transcript on file with the Emory International Law Review).

In the face of the profound sadness we feel in his passing, we are continually inspired by Professor Bederman and we carry on in hopes of honoring his memory.

It is with tremendous grief, but also with deep admiration and everlasting gratitude, that the Editorial Board dedicates this, the 26th volume of the Emory International Law Review, to the life of Professor David Bederman.

Footnotes

1David J. Bederman, 25 Years of Student Scholarship and Editorship for the Emory International Law Review, 25 Emory Int’l L. Rev. 1, 2 (2011).

2John Witte, Jr., Jonas Robitscher Professor of Law & Alonzo L. McDonald Distinguished Professor, In Memory of David J. Bederman (Dec. 12, 2011) (transcript on file with the Emory International Law Review).