Emory Law Journal

Volume 64Issue 2
The 2014 Randolph W. Thrower Symposium, American Dispute Resolution in 2020: The Death of Group Vindication and the Law?
In Memoriam: Randolph W. Thrower

Dedication

Emory Law Journal | 64 Emory L.J. 251 (2014)

The editors of the Emory Law Journal respectfully dedicate this Issue to Randolph W. Thrower.

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The Randolph W. Thrower Symposium: A Lasting Legacy of Margaret and Randolph Thrower

Patricia T. Barmeyer, Wilson G. Barmeyer | 64 Emory L.J. 255 (2014)

Randolph W. Thrower—our father and grandfather—was remarkable in many ways: an exceptional attorney; a civic and political leader; a courageous public servant; a zealous advocate for the rights of women, minorities, and the poor; and mentor to generations of young lawyers. But although the Thrower Symposium bears Randolph’s name, the genesis of the symposium came not from Randolph, but rather from his wife, Margaret Munroe Thrower.

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Randolph W. Thrower: A Tribute

William H. Bradley | 64 Emory L.J. 257 (2014)

It is a mark of our success and growth as an institution that so many of us now present never had the chance to practice with Randolph, although he remained active until well into his eighties. It is not hyperbole to say that he was a giant—in our firm, in the legal profession, and as a human being. He was truly the complete lawyer. I can’t, in a few minutes, touch on everything, and I won’t try. But here are a few things.

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In Memoriam: Randolph W. Thrower

N. Jerold Cohen, Jerome B. Libin | 64 Emory L.J. 261 (2014)

Randolph Thrower was born in 1913, the same year in which the Sixteenth Amendment was ratified. Perhaps it was destiny, perhaps not, but Randolph’s path slowly but ultimately led him into the world of tax law, where he came to enjoy great success and well-deserved admiration as one of the premier tax lawyers of his day.

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Randolph Thrower—A Personal Remembrance

Steve Gottlieb | 64 Emory L.J. 267 (2014)

Randolph Thrower was an extraordinary man, but I did not get a chance to meet him until after everyone already knew that. In fact, I met him because of the unique reputation he had with lawyers throughout Atlanta.

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Randolph W. Thrower: A Tribute

Phyllis A. Kravitch | 64 Emory L.J. 271 (2014)

It is a privilege for me to write a few words about the late Randolph Thrower, one of Georgia’s most outstanding members of the bar. Not only was he a skilled practitioner, but he embodied all of the admirable qualities of a member of the legal profession.

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Randolph Thrower—An Appreciation

James T. Laney | 64 Emory L.J. 273 (2014)

Randolph Thrower towered among Emory alumni of the twentieth century. He was rightly celebrated for embodying the highest degree of professionalism, judgment, and character.

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Randolph W. Thrower: Serving the Public with Principle, Passion, and Poetry

Robert A. Schapiro | 64 Emory L.J. 277 (2014)

Randolph W. Thrower was a most distinguished alumnus and role model. He was a man of high ideals, who served the public with principle, passion, and poetry. His illustrious career always will remain an inspiration for Emory lawyers—indeed all lawyers—current and future.

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Randolph Thrower: A Man for All Seasons

Charles A. Shanor | 64 Emory L.J. 281 (2014)

Randolph Thrower left large legacies on the legal profession, on American government, and at the Emory University School of Law. In addition, he made strong, positive contributions to the lives of those who, like me, were privileged to practice law under his tutelage.

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Randolph W. Thrower as Commissioner of Internal Revenue—A Personal Tribute

K. Martin Worthy | 64 Emory L.J. 285 (2014)

I first came to know Randolph Thrower when I returned as a student to the Emory University School of Law after World War II and enrolled my senior year in an advanced Tax Problems course Randolph taught as a part-time adjunct professor. Instead of studying court opinions on particular legal issues—which had been the traditional method of teaching law since its introduction at Harvard in the nineteenth century—Randy gave us, each time we met, a set of questions raised by a theoretical client on which we were to identify potential tax problems and advise the client what he should do. This, of course, is just what tax lawyers are called to do in real life, and I have always thought that this was the best course I ever had in law school.

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