Emory Law News Center

April 2013 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Emory Law strengthens focus on career management

Emory Law strengthens focus on career management

Emory University School of Law has announced the integration of its Office of Career Services with its recently established Center for Professional Development and Career Strategy (the Center), furthering its commitment to provide the best professional development resources for students. Lydia Russo has been named to lead the Center as assistant dean for professional development and career strategy.

Rafael I. Pardo

Pardo in WSJ: Testamentary trusts may inspire work ethic

Individuals, for the most part, fall into one of two categories regarding their attitudes toward work: Either they live to work, or they work to live. If your heir falls squarely in the former category, a dramatic change in wealth is not likely to affect his or her motivation to work.

Guttman 85L on new global legal norms

Guttman 85L on new global legal norms

As multinationals move around the globe, legal systems are cross-pollinated. China is a case in point, says Reuben Guttman, who has just returned from an event in Shanghai dealing with securities dereliction. The session was conducted as part of an ongoing relationship between Emory Law School, a nationally ranked law school based in Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai Jiao Tong's KoGuan Law School, a nationally ranked law school in China.

Nessouli 13L writes for CNN World Blog on Iraq's oil

Nessouli 13L writes for CNN World Blog on Iraq's oil

The debate over whether the Iraq War was really all about oil may never be fully resolved in some minds, but one thing is clear -- either way, Iraq has yet to really cash in. The country's GDP may have risen several fold in the decade since the war began, yet its income per capita lags not only oil rich neighbors such as Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Will Iraq be able to meet its oil potential?

Bloomberg quotes Holbrook on gene patenting

Bloomberg quotes Holbrook on gene patenting

A U.S. Supreme Court clash over the patenting of human genes left several justices searching for a middle ground in a case with the potential to redefine rights in the biotechnology and agricultural industries.

Price receives Robert Wood Johnson fellowship to study tuberculosis at U.S. border

Price receives Robert Wood Johnson fellowship to study tuberculosis at U.S. border

As the debate on U.S. immigration reform continues in Congress, Polly Price, professor at Emory University School of Law, will study a lesser-known, public health component of the issue -- the rise of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis along the southern U.S. border.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown in Forbes: Reveal how much Congress members pay in taxes

I suspect that if we looked at the tax returns of every member of Congress we would see something close to a 100% itemization rate. Compare that to only a third of the American public, and the numbers would suggest that repeal is the best way forward.