Emory Law News Center

June 2014 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Mark Goldfeder

Goldfeder in Forbes: How Hobby Lobby will affect business

Monday, the Supreme Court will release their decision in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby, perhaps the most anticipated ruling of the season. The Justices will consider whether a for-profit corporation can refuse to provide certain contraceptive services in health plans offered to employees, if doing so violate the owners' particular Christian beliefs.

Same-sex marriage could be legal nationwide next year, Perry says

Same-sex marriage could be legal nationwide next year, Perry says

The U.S. Supreme Court will likely issue a ruling next year requiring all states to allow same-sex couples to marry, an Emory constitutional law expert predicts. Michael Perry, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Law and a senior fellow at Emory's Center for the Study of Law and Religion, cited today's ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit striking down Utah's ban on same-sex marriage.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown in NYTimes: College presidents overwhelmingly white, male

As the higher education landscape has dramatically shifted, the demographic profile of a college president has not. The American Council on Education shows that the profile of the typical college president has not changed over the last 25 years. Another study published this month shows that for the academic year 2012-13, 71 percent of presidents were white and male.

Nader cites Shepherd-Bailey study in calling for GMO food labeling

Nader cites Shepherd-Bailey study in calling for GMO food labeling

Across the country, consumers are demanding the right to know what is in their food, and labeling of genetically engineered food. The scare tactic raised by the food industry that labeling would increase prices has been debunked in an study by Joanna Shepherd Bailey, a professor at Emory University School of Law.

Holbrook comments in Fortune on Redskins trademark cancellation

Holbrook comments in Fortune on Redskins trademark cancellation

On Wednesday, the United States Patent and Trademark Office cancelled six federal trademarks that were registered to the professional American football team Washington Redskins--another strike against team owner Dan Snyder, who has refused to change the team's name.

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash calls for regulatory transparency from the EPA

By eschewing direct regulation of the co-pollutants under the Clean Air Act, the EPA leaves itself open to the charge that it is playing politics rather than engaging in reasoned decision-making.

Goldfeder for CNN on limits, liability of artificial intelligence

Goldfeder for CNN on limits, liability of artificial intelligence

For the first time, a computer program passed the Turing Test for artificial intelligence. A computer on Saturday was able to trick one third of a team of researchers convened by the University of Reading into believing it was human -- in this case a 13-year old boy named Eugene.

Turner Clinic aids passage of Atlanta's Urban Agriculture Ordinance

Turner Clinic aids passage of Atlanta's Urban Agriculture Ordinance

Earlier this week, the Atlanta City Council passed the urban ag zoning ordinance. The ordinance allows Atlantans to grow their own foods, which can be sold at places like farmer's markets and local restaurants." There are numerous folks who just don't have access to fresh, local produce, fresh foods and are getting most of their nutrition from convenience stores," says Mindy Goldstein, the director of the Turner Environmental Law Clinic.

Buzbee: EPA greenhouse emission reduction proposal has "strong legal basis"

Buzbee: EPA greenhouse emission reduction proposal has "strong legal basis"

On June 2, 2014, the United States Environmental Protection Agency issued its much awaited and debated proposed Clean Air Act Section 111(d) regulations to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from existing electric utility generating units, colloquially referred to as power plants.