Emory Law News Center

August 2014 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Obama nominates Marti 99L to lead intellectual property enforcement

Obama nominates Marti 99L to lead intellectual property enforcement

The White House announced Thursday that it is nominating a new Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator, known colloquially as the "IP czar." He is Washington lawyer Daniel H. Marti. The position coordinates U.S. law-enforcement strategy around copyright, patents and trademarks. The coordinator's duties, somewhat controversial from the start, include harmonizing the enforcement activities of several federal agencies under the White House's Joint Strategic Plan on Intellectual Property Enforcement.

Mary L. Dudziak

Dudziak in Foreign Affairs: Ferguson from afar

As the turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri, unfolds, questions about the United States' commitment to human rights are once more headlining news coverage around the world. The uncomfortable international spotlight on such domestic problems should not be surprising. American racial inequality regularly dominated foreign news coverage during the 1950s and 1960s. Strong presidential leadership was needed to address earlier civil rights crises. It helped repair the damage to the American image, and undercut the argument that the United States was hypocritical in promoting human rights. Then, as now, protecting rights serves U.S. international relations.

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash for The Hill: high-speed police pursuits and deadly force

What leeway do police have when using deadly force to end dangerous high-speed chases? Left with little to reconcile the seemingly conflicting analyses in Scott v. Harris and Plumhoff v. Rickard, law enforcement officials may find themselves at the mercy of lower courts that may be influenced more by what they see in after-the-fact on video recordings than by what they read in clear Supreme Court precedents.

Turner Environmental Law Clinic: City of Atlanta urban agricultural ordinance

Turner Environmental Law Clinic: City of Atlanta urban agricultural ordinance

In June 2014, the City of Atlanta approved an urban agricultural ordinance. Emory Law's Turner Environmental Law Clinic played a significant role in developing the ordinance.

Turner Clinic alum: Taxpayers in the dark and at risk from Vogtle nuclear loan guarantees

Turner Clinic alum: Taxpayers in the dark and at risk from Vogtle nuclear loan guarantees

As a student with the Turner Environmental Law Clinic, Emory Law alum Whitney Rappole had the opportunity to join the Clinic in representing the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) and investigating federal loan guarantees offered by the Department of Energy to Southern Company and its partners.

Guttman 85L in Forbes: can we trust corporations to self-investigate?

Guttman 85L in Forbes: can we trust corporations to self-investigate?

Where wrongful conduct actually results in increased revenue that rewards corporate officers and employees, is it plausible that an internal compliance mechanism can freely and fully investigate and right wrongful behavior? Do corporations really have an incentive to fully address wrongful conduct that generates significant revenue? These are important questions particularly at a time when civil and criminal penalties are merely part of the cost of doing business.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown for CNN: How Ferguson's citizens can take back power

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has appointed Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, a black man, to take over the security on the ground in Ferguson. The President has issued a call for calm in the wake of a weekend police shooting that left teenager Michael Brown dead. Anyone in the black community who says voting is a waste of time because "they don't care about us" should take a good, hard look at Ferguson, Missouri. Almost 68% of its citizens are black and just under 30% are white. Five of six city council members are white, the mayor is white, the chief of police is white, and its police force has 50 whites and three blacks.

Davis 79L flies Ebola patient home for treatment at Emory

Davis 79L flies Ebola patient home for treatment at Emory

Randy Davis 79L was one of three captains who piloted a private plane from Liberia to return American aid worker Nancy Writebol to the U.S. to receive treatment for Ebola. Davis said that he was not nervous about his proximity to the contagious patient, and that he viewed it as an honor. "I think everybody everywhere would agree that you'd like to try to help people who are so selfless," Davis said to ABC News.

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash for The Hill: Both recent Circuit Court opinions muddy Obamacare's future

Last week, two federal courts of appeals issued opinions on ObamaCare. Common wisdom sees the opinion of the DC Circuit--which was issued first--as a potential death knell for ObamaCare. The Fourth Circuit opinion issued a few hours later was received as having reached a conclusion favorable to ObamaCare, thus dividing the courts of appeals. The Fourth Circuit's conclusion that the statute is ambiguous means that the Obama administration's regulations stand. But it also means that another administration--perhaps one with a Republican president--could issue new regulations that restricted the tax credit to states with state-created exchanges.