Emory Law News Center

September 2014 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Timothy R. Holbrook

Holbrook for CNN: Marriage equality is not like abortion

The Supreme Court is set to decide whether to take the same-sex marriage cases on September 29, a mere 15 months since they overturned the Defense of Marriage Act as unconstitutional. That decision created a deluge of cases which have found that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional. The issues in marriage equality differ significantly from those in the abortion debate. With marriage, the answer is binary -- either same-sex couples can marry or they can't.

Holbrook quoted in WSJ on software patent protection

Holbrook quoted in WSJ on software patent protection

It's open season on software patents. That's the message federal courts have sent in recent weeks after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that tackled the question of whether--and when--computer programs can qualify for intellectual-property protection. The trend represents a worst-case scenario for patent-licensing firms, which their detractors call "patent trolls."

Supreme Court case on dentist-only teeth whitening calls for antitrust law, Volokh says

Supreme Court case on dentist-only teeth whitening calls for antitrust law, Volokh says

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments next month over dentists' ability to keep the business of teeth whitening to themselves. Is it reasonable for a government licensing agency to limit commercial teeth whitening to dentists as a matter of public health, or is it pure self-preservation on the part of dentists who sit on the licensing boards? "If antitrust law is justified anywhere, surely this is one of the most compelling cases," Emory Law Associate Professor Alexander Volokh tells the Daily Report. (Log-in required)

Richard D.  Freer

Freer's "The new reach of general jurisdiction" published in San Francisco Daily Journal

"For generations, based upon International Shoe (1945), no one doubted that general jurisdiction is appropriate when a corporation engages in 'continuous and systematic' activities in a given state," Richard Howell Hall Professor of Law Richard D. Freer writes in a Sept. 15 op-ed article for the San Francisco Daily Journal. "Things are different now. In Goodyear Dunlop Tires Operations, S.A. v. Brown (2011) and Daimler AG v. Bauman (2014), the U.S. Supreme Court recast general jurisdiction. Now general jurisdiction is proper only where the defendant is 'at home.'" (Subscription required)

Blank speaks on international law at ICT 14th World Summit

Blank speaks on international law at ICT 14th World Summit

Edan Landau discusses international law in a new urban war zone with Professor Laurie Blank and her frequent co-author Geoffrey Corn, professor of law and presidential research scholar at South Texas College of Law.

Blank discusses counterterrorism at panel led by Richemond-Barak

Blank discusses counterterrorism at panel led by Richemond-Barak

Daphne Richemond-Barak heads the International Law Desk of the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT). She led a panel titled, "New Battlefields/Old Laws: The Next Steps in Counterterrorism: Adapting to an Evolving Threat and an Expanding Battlefield," with guests Laurie Blank, Professor William C. Banks, Professor Jennifer Daskal, and Professor Nathan Sales.

Mary L. Dudziak

Carnegie Council: Dudziak on civil liberties during wartime

Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law Mary Dudziak discusses how wartime laws and policy often live beyond the present conflict, to have lasting effects upon civil liberties. Starting with World War I, she examines how overseas wars can deeply affect individual rights at home, in a Q & A with Carnegie Council Associate Editor for Ethics & International Affairs Zach Dorfman.

Velikonja cited in Economist: What happens after the big corporate settlement?

Velikonja cited in Economist: What happens after the big corporate settlement?

Professor Urska Velikonja's work is cited by The Economist, in an article that questions how the proceeds of large fines levied against corporations are administered. "The disarray stemmed from the lack of a coherent plan to compensate defrauded investors," the article reads. "In a forthcoming article in the Stanford Law Review Urska Velikonja, a professor at Emory University, argues that this reflects the failure to identify specific misconduct when setting up the deal."