Emory Law News Center

October 2014 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Price on GPB: Georgia may be testing ground for immigration issues' impact on elections

Price on GPB: Georgia may be testing ground for immigration issues' impact on elections

Immigration issues have been in the forefront of U.S. politics for several years, and in 2011, Georgia passed one of the strictest immigration laws in the country. Emory Law Professor Polly Price discussed how immigration may influence both state and national elections, on Georgia Public Broadcasting's "On Second Thought" radio show. She notes Georgia has the country's sixth-highest Hispanic population, and that immigrants now represent 13 percent of the U.S. population.

Dowd 65L: Better counsel could have saved Rose from baseball ban (registration required)

Dowd 65L: Better counsel could have saved Rose from baseball ban (registration required)

Pete Rose could have saved his place in major league baseball had he been counseled to admit he gambled on his team, said John Dowd 65L, the lawyer who led the 1989 investigation into the game's all-time hit leader. The Emory event marked the 25th anniversary of Rose's banishment. Dowd and Allan Diamond 79L, partner of Diamond McCarthy in Houston, talked with Emory Law students on Oct. 30.

Polly J.  Price

Price in Time: Mandatory quarantine for nurse Kaci Hickox can influence other states' ebola policies

Emory University law professor Polly Price says if the court decides in favor of the Maine health officials, other states may ¿feel free to post armed guards outside of asymptomatic people¿s houses, or confine them in an institution.¿

Kay L. Levine

Levine comments on DeKalb corruption cases

In its coverage of recent DeKalb County corruption cases, public radio station WABE-FM consulted legal experts on the ramifications of witness credibility issues. "It's always easy to Monday morning quarterback," said Emory University School of Law professor Kay Levine. "When it falls apart it's very easy to look back and say, 'you should have thought this through more.'"

Berry 03L: The Intersection of Government, Law, and Politics

Berry 03L: The Intersection of Government, Law, and Politics

Jeremy Berry 97C 03L knew as an Emory freshman that he was interested in politics and government, and his resume shows it. As an undergrad, the political science major served as Student Government Association president, interned for the Clinton/Gore White House, and worked for a U.S. senator. But it was after graduation, during a stint at Emory's Office of Government and Community Affairs, that Berry experienced a pivotal moment--chauffeuring Congressman John Lewis around Emory¿s campus during a day-long visit.

Washington Post cites Shepherd, Kang study on bare-knuckle judicial ads

Washington Post cites Shepherd, Kang study on bare-knuckle judicial ads

From the Washington Post: A new study by Emory Law Professors Joanna Shepherd and Michael Kang finds that the more ads aired during state supreme court campaigns, the more likely justices are to rule against criminal defendants--potentially from fear of appearing "soft on crime." The professors examined 3,000 state supreme court criminal appeals from 2008 to 2013. It's the latest in a string of findings that suggest increased campaign spending by pro-business groups may distort judicial rulings.

NYTimes features Shepherd, Kang study: How attack ads affect justices' votes

NYTimes features Shepherd, Kang study: How attack ads affect justices' votes

The New York Times featured Professors Joanna Shepherd and Michael Kang's just-released study, "Skewed Justice." The study had two major findings: (1) The more TV ads aired during state supreme court judicial elections in a state, the less likely justices are to vote in favor of criminal defendants, and (2), justices in states whose bans on corporate and union spending on elections were struck down by Citizens United were less likely to vote in favor of criminal defendants than they were before the decision.

Price quoted in Time on voluntary vs. court-ordered quarantine

Price quoted in Time on voluntary vs. court-ordered quarantine

Professor Polly Price was quoted in Time magazine in an article about the legalities of quarantine for those who may have been exposed to Ebola. "If healthcare workers resist signing the voluntary quarantine or defy its recommendations after agreeing to it, Emory University law professor Polly Price says that it's likely an official quarantine would be ordered. 'They could go and get a court order to formalize it, possibly even after the fact,' Price says. 'But they would likely seek a formal quarantine.'"

Holbrook receives Outstanding Service to the Stonewall Community Award

Holbrook receives Outstanding Service to the Stonewall Community Award

Emory Law Professor Timothy Holbrook received the Outstanding Service to the Stonewall Community Award. Holbrook has written many opinion pieces in national newspapers about same-sex marriage and wrote a friend-of-the-court brief on behalf of former NFL stars Chris Kluwe of the Minnesota Vikings and Brendan Ayanbadejo of the Baltimore Ravens urging the Supreme Court to sack California's Proposition 8.

Price in WSJ: How does U.S. administer quarantine during health emergencies? (subscription required)

Price in WSJ: How does U.S. administer quarantine during health emergencies? (subscription required)

The revelation that a second Texas health-care worker diagnosed with the Ebola virus flew from Dallas to Cleveland and back has raised a looming question: Why wasn't she quarantined before boarding a plane? The answer lies in a layered health-care system that relies on close coordination between state, local and federal authorities to be effective in stopping disease. Professor Polly Price says the federal government's quarantine power derives from a late 19th-century compromise between state and federal lawmakers. At the time it was understood the federal government would exercise its interstate quarantine authority only at the request of states.

Price, Emory attorneys discuss legalities of Ebola treatment, quarantine

Price, Emory attorneys discuss legalities of Ebola treatment, quarantine

A top lawyer at Emory University said Tuesday that even with a decade of planning, the school's health care system had to deal with unexpected issues--including legal matters--as its campus hospital began treating Americans who contracted the Ebola virus in West Africa. A panel discussion at Emory Law included Professor Polly Price, an expert in public health, and a lawyer who serves on the school's police force.

Reuters cites Velikonja in upcoming decision on victims of insider trading

Reuters cites Velikonja in upcoming decision on victims of insider trading

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday asked a judge for more time to decide whether money from a $602 million settlement with SAC Capital Advisors should go to investors claiming they are victims of SAC's insider trading scheme. Some say insider trading victims are nearly impossible to identify, and argue it is a victimless crime. But over the past decade the SEC has distributed $100 million in settlement money to people identified as victims in 15 insider trading cases, according to a study by Emory Law Assistant Professor Urska Velikonja.

Stateline cites Barton: Poor children diagnosed with ADHD much more often

Stateline cites Barton: Poor children diagnosed with ADHD much more often

Children covered by Medicaid, the joint federal-state health-care program for the poor, are at least 50 percent more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD. Georgia alone spends $28 million to $33 million annually on these treatments out of its $2.5 billion Medicaid budget, according to the Barton Child Law and Policy Center at Emory University.

Lindsay 88L named U.S. magistrate in Kentucky's Western District

Lindsay 88L named U.S. magistrate in Kentucky's Western District

A new U.S. magistrate judge has been named for the western district of Kentucky. A statement from Chief Judge Joseph H. McKinley Jr. says 51-year-old Colin H. Lindsay will assume the position on Jan. 1 after the retirement of Judge James D. Moyer.

Alexander: West Virginia is a leader in combatting blight

Alexander: West Virginia is a leader in combatting blight

West Virginia is among a small group of states stepping up to take charge in the revitalization of its communities through reclaiming blighted, abandoned and dilapidated properties, a national expert said Wednesday. Emory Law Professor Frank Alexander, co-founder of the Center for Community Progress, spoke with community and business leaders from across West Virginia during the West Virginia BAD Buildings Summit on Wednesday at the Visual Arts Center in downtown Huntington. BAD stands for blighted, abandoned and dilapidated.

8th Annual BLSA Speaker Series: The realities of diversity in practice

8th Annual BLSA Speaker Series: The realities of diversity in practice

"Diversity is important not because of the optics. Lots of places just want to look diverse. It is what people bring with them, not their skin color or sexual orientation," DeKalb County District Attorney Robert James Jr. said during the eighth annual Black Law Students Association speaker series, held at Emory Law. "It is their frame of reference and background. You are better as an institution if you are diverse. Diversity does not equal tokenism. It makes us greater."

Timothy R. Holbrook

Holbrook in the AJC: Supreme Court's surprising non-decision on same-sex marriage

On Monday, the Supreme Court did something no one expected: It refused to hear any of the cases striking down same-sex marriage bans. Most observers thought the court would either grant review or delay any action to see whether any lower appellate courts would find such bans constitutional. But it didn't wait and, by declining to hear the cases, allowed same-sex marriages to begin in Utah, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Indiana and Virginia. In fact, wedding bells have already started to ring in Virginia.

Holbrook comments on continuing Apple, Android patent wars

Holbrook comments on continuing Apple, Android patent wars

Google Inc. and Apple Inc. will have to fight a proxy patent war on their home turf of northern California, thanks to a ruling issued by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit on Thursday saying Google had presented "a classic case for a stay" in Texas proceedings. "It is clear that there was no need to proceed with the five Texas actions because the one California action may suffice," Circuit Judge Kathleen M. O'Malley writes. "I do think this is a conscious step to try to combat some of the abuses by patent assertion entities and short-circuit potential patent reform," Professor Tim Holbrook said.

Price in the Wall Street Journal: How law informs Ebola response

Price in the Wall Street Journal: How law informs Ebola response

The aggressive response that health officials have mounted to the Ebola virus in Dallas is likely to prevent a wide-scale outbreak. But multiple snafus reveal some unexpected issues the U.S. would have to prepare for in the event of a larger-scale infectious disease threat, the Wall Street Journal reports. Quarantine is an important element of preventing its spread. "We don't have a lot of experience with quarantining well people," says Emory Law Professor Polly Price. "This is all fairly new for us. Imagine what it would be like if we had to do it on a really large scale."

LA Times op-ed cites Dudziak on U.S. decision to go to war, again

LA Times op-ed cites Dudziak on U.S. decision to go to war, again

"For American purposes, war as a political tool has more and more demonstrated its inability to deliver," writes West Point Professor Gregory Daddis. "In truth, decisiveness in war has historically been elusive, especially in the decades following the end of World War II. If war provides meaning, why, as Emory Law Professor Mary Dudziak asks, does military engagement no longer require 'the support of the American people but instead their inattention?'"

Price on federal, state law governing Ebola, public health

Price on federal, state law governing Ebola, public health

Laws that authorities may use to prevent an Ebola outbreak in the United States are designed to work best for a disease with a much shorter incubation period, says Emory Law Professor Polly Price. In the U.S., an attorney is provided to someone who wishes to challenge their quarantine or isolation. But, Price said, "Whenever the judges have a public health person in their courtroom telling them there's a threat, they're not going to second guess." Price's public lecture, "Ebola in the U.S." will be held at Emory Law, Oct. 14 More info

CNN interviews Ahdieh on China's likely reaction to Hong Kong protests

CNN interviews Ahdieh on China's likely reaction to Hong Kong protests

Emory Law Vice Dean Robert Ahdieh was interviewed by CNN on how China will react to the ongoing pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, and how the current situation differs from the 1989 student protests in Beijing's Tiananmen Square.

Op-ed on ridiculous NJ suits cites Shepherd study on consumer fraud

Op-ed on ridiculous NJ suits cites Shepherd study on consumer fraud

A few simple, common-sense amendments to the current Consumer Fraud Act would punish deceptive business practices while curbing nuisance litigation against honest businesses. A new white paper from Emory University Law School professor Joanna Shepherd, "The Expansion of New Jersey's Consumer Fraud Act: Causes and Consequences," details just how we got to the point where we are suing over sandwiches. It begins by explaining that the Garden State's law was initially modeled after the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914.

Alexander's work on land bank aids Macon revitalization

Alexander's work on land bank aids Macon revitalization

The rebuilt Beall's Hill neighborhood has been held up as a success story in fighting blight and revitalizing a part of town that many had written off as unsalvageable. Frank Alexander, an Emory University law professor and co-founder of a nonprofit focused on blight solutions, was involved in the creation of the Macon-Bibb Land Bank. Land banks are a good way to address blight, but there is no one-size-fits-all approach, he says.