Emory Law News Center

April 2015 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Turner Environmental Law Clinic featured in UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy Report

Turner Environmental Law Clinic featured in UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy Report

Turner Environmental Law Clinic featured in UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy Report, Food Equity, Social Justice, and the Role of Law Schools: A Call to Action.

Justice Ginsburg cites Shepherd/Kang study in Supreme Court judicial elections case

Justice Ginsburg cites Shepherd/Kang study in Supreme Court judicial elections case

In a decision viewed as a limited victory for campaign finance reform, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg cited Emory Law Professors Joanna Shepherd and Michael Kang's 2014 study "Skewed Justice," in joining a 5-4 majority decision that found in states where judges are elected, their role in soliciting financial contributions should be limited. (See page 31.)

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im

An-Na'im cited by Aliran Monthly on greatest threat to society and religion

What is the greatest threat to society and religion? Writer Nicholas Chen cites Professor Abdullahi An'Nai'm's book, Islam and the Secular State: Negotiating the Future of Shari¿a, in asserting that separation of state and religion "not only preserves the wellbeing of the society, but also the integrity of the religion."

Reuben Guttman 85L: Advocacy is a two-way street

Reuben Guttman 85L: Advocacy is a two-way street

Young lawyers learning about advocacy need to understand how judges think if they are to master the skill, says Reuben Guttman 85L. "Last year at Emory Law School, I convened a panel of four judges with the hope of giving students an insight into their lives. It was enlightening for the students to learn that these judges had dockets ranging from a couple hundred to several thousand cases."

Dorothy A.  Brown

Dorothy Brown for CNN: The real shame of Ben Affleck running from his family's history

Emory Law professor Dorothy A. Brown writes about how Ben Affleck and Henry Louis Gates missed an opportunity to discuss racial issues when they decided not to air a segment of the TV documentary, "Finding Your Roots," which uncovered that one of Affleck's ancestors was a slave owner.

Holbrook for CNN: Who's the real bully on LGBT rights?

Holbrook for CNN: Who's the real bully on LGBT rights?

In an op-ed for CNN, Emory University Law professor Timothy Holbrook counters the view that the opponents of same-sex marriage feel they are being "bullied" into silence.

Robert A. Schapiro

Schapiro provides expertise as Supreme Court hears gay marriage case

Robert Schapiro, dean of the Emory University School of Law and an expert on Constitutional law, was a guest on a segment about the U.S Supreme court taking up the issue of gay marriage and how the court's decision will affect Georgia.

Robert A. Schapiro

Dean Robert Schapiro for Emory Wheel: Lewis chair helps advance scholarly mission in civil rights and social justice,

Emory Law received a $1.5 million donation to help establish a John Lewis Chair in Civil Rights and Social Justice, providing "a very visible reminder of the Law School¿s commitment to diversity,¿ according to Dean Robert Schapiro.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown in Emory Wheel: New Lewis chair builds a new chapter in championing civil rights

Dorothy Brown, professor of law and vice provost of Emory University, says that the new John Lewis Chair in Civil Rights and Social Justice is "an opportunity to solidify Emory¿s ties to Atlanta and 'carry the baton forward.'"

Attorney General Sam Olens 83L: Georgia will respect Supreme Court decision

Attorney General Sam Olens 83L: Georgia will respect Supreme Court decision

During an appearance before the Atlanta Press Club, Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens 83L discussed potential legal defense of Georgia's constitutional ban on gay marriage if the high court overrules bans on same-sex marriage: "If the court rules that Georgia's constitutional amendment is legal, the press release from my office will be that the Supreme Court has spoken."

Morgan Cloud

RICO prosecution in APS cheating case not surprising, Cloud tells LA Times

When prosecutors in the Atlanta Public Schools cheating case used RICO laws to pursue convictions for educators, some observers cried overkill. The federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act debuted in the 1970s as a means to prosecute gangsters and mob bosses. But as Emory Law Professor Morgan Cloud told the Los Angeles Times, it wasn't a stretch. "I was not surprised in the least," Cloud said. "It's sufficiently egregious, and this clearly fit within the way the RICO statute has been applied since 1970."

Polly J.  Price

Denying health services to non-citizens weakens overall public health, Price says

As we saw with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the overall health of a population is a key component in the emergence and spread of contagious disease. But sovereign boundaries and distinctions between citizens and non-citizens undermine public health in the United States. State and local public health departments are the primary defense against contagion. But US public health agencies--already under-resourced because public funding is politically tenuous--must work within a system in which citizens and non-citizens are segregated with respect to access to health care.

Alexander Volokh

The Volokh Conspiracy: Beyond Cheryl's birthday

This is about the Cheryl's birthday problem from Singapore that the Internet has been talking about recently. I won't bother solving this one-- it's all over the Internet by now--or answering the obvious questions like why would Cheryl even do such a thing, and why don't Albert and Bernard just pool their information?

Polly J.  Price

Price for The Hill: McCain, Congress should lead fight against drug resistant TB

This month, Sen. John McCain lobbied to prevent the release of an immigration detainee diagnosed with drug-resistant tuberculosis. McCain did so on behalf of Pinal County, Ariz., which faced staggering medical costs to treat the patient and to prevent further spread of a dreaded and difficult to treat disease. That's the right thing to do, says Professor Polly Price. But she argues it shouldn't be a one-off solution.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown for CNN: Did South Carolina police learn from Ferguson?

"Routine stops for walking in the middle of the street or driving with a broken taillight--these should not result in anyone's death. But time and again it ends with a black man dead in the street and the community has no recourse," Emory Law Professor and Vice Provost Dorothy Brown writes. "This time the stage was set in North Charleston, South Carolina, a city of about 100,000 people. Walter Scott was stopped by Officer Michael Slager for a broken taillight, and within minutes Scott was dead."

Tisdale 72L: "Environmental lawyers can save the earth"

Tisdale 72L: "Environmental lawyers can save the earth"

Chet Tisdale 72L calls on environmental lawyers to continue the advances earned during the 1970s, including the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts. "Environmental lawyers care about the environment. We may fight about how clean is clean. We may disagree on how stringent an air or water discharge standard must be," he writes for the American College of Environmental Lawyers. "But we all want to reduce pollution to levels that protect human health and the environment and are cost effective."

Chakravarty 97L, federal team, successfully prosecute Boston Marathon bomber

Chakravarty 97L, federal team, successfully prosecute Boston Marathon bomber

A federal jury found Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a failing college student and the youngest child in a dispersed Russian immigrant family, guilty of the 2013 bombings at the Boston Marathon, the worst act of terrorism on American soil since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the New York Times reports. Aloke Chakravarty 97L was a member of the prosecution team that led the jury to convict following 11 hours of deliberations over two days.

Brown to Congress: Show us your tax returns

Brown to Congress: Show us your tax returns

The National Journal featured a Q & A with Emory Law Professor and Vice Provost Dorothy Brown, who has called for Congress to make their tax returns public for years. "I have been writing and thinking about tax reform--or, I should say, the lack of tax reform--for a really long time. The typical American cannot take advantage of most of the deductions and loopholes that I believe members of Congress are taking advantage of because of their incomes. And I believe, if the public saw this great disparity, they might demand tax reform from the bottom up."

Cloud explains prosecution's choices in APS cheating case

Cloud explains prosecution's choices in APS cheating case

Professor Morgan Cloud was a guest on The Kojo Nnamdi Show, to explain the prosecution's use of Georgia's Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations laws against the educators accused in the Atlanta Public Schools cheating trial. A governor's blue-ribbon panel found half of the school system's elementary and middle schools were involved, Cloud said, and that the cheating scheme was "conducted and condoned, and probably enforced from the very top of the administration." The RICO Act "was most powerful legal tool available to the prosecutors, and it really fit this case beautifully," Cloud said. "It really would have been a surprise had they not used the RICO statute."

Wallack 94L happy for client's acquittal in APS cheating case

Wallack 94L happy for client's acquittal in APS cheating case

As the attorney for the only defendant acquitted of all charges by the jury deciding the Atlanta Public Schools test-cheating trial, Atlanta solo practitioner Sanford "Sandy" Wallack is happy for his client and eager to get back to the rest of his law practice, which he essentially placed on hold during the seven-month-long trial, writes Greg Land of the Daily Report.

American Banker cites Velikonja's work on SEC waivers

American Banker cites Velikonja's work on SEC waivers

The SEC's bad actor provisions automatically disqualify firms and individuals that break certain securities laws from using a streamlined process to offer securities to investors, Thaya Brook Knight writes in American Banker. But the SEC may waive the disqualification for defendants who can show good cause as to why the disqualification shouldn't apply to them. "A recent study by Urska Velikonja of Emory University School of Law, cited enthusiastically by the bill's supporters, reported that large firms received 82 percent of 201 waivers granted between July 2003 and December 2014," Knight writes, while ultimately arguing such waivers are appropriate and necessary.

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash for The Hill: Why "judicially unadministrable" matters

"Two words in a Supreme Court opinion handed down last week seem arcane, but may have substantial repercussions for how Congress drafts statutes and how courts interpret them," Emory Law Professor Jonathan Nash writes for The Hill. In Armstrong v. Exceptional Child Center, Inc.,, Justice Antonin Scalia's majority opinion described the statutory provision --which instructs that states should "safeguard against unnecessary utilization of ... care and services" while also providing payments "consistent with efficiency, economy, and quality of care"--as "judicially unadministrable."

An-Na'im joins "Understanding to Action" panel on genocide, xenophobia

An-Na'im joins "Understanding to Action" panel on genocide, xenophobia

Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im was a guest panelist for a recent talk sponsored by the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust, on past and current human rights abuses. Other panelists included British Consul General Jeremy Pilmore-Bedford, publisher M. Alexis Scott, and Holocaust survivor Norbert Friedman. The event was held at the Center for Civil and Human Rights.

Indiana law needs LGBT nondiscrimination fix, Holbrook tells CNN

Indiana law needs LGBT nondiscrimination fix, Holbrook tells CNN

Many states are using the laws to carve out exceptions to allow Christians to deny services to same-sex couples, said Emory Law Professor Tim Holbrook. "The timing is beyond a coincidence," he said. "We are having an interest in RFRA at the time same-sex marriage is coming forward." Holbrook suggests that a "fix" for the Indiana law would be the passage of a nondiscrimination law. Or, at the very least, an exception written into the religious freedom bill that protects from such discrimination.