Emory Law News Center

February 2016 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Paul J. Zwier

Zwier, Guttman for the AJC: Regulatory enforcement in a global economy

The SEC, the EPA and the EEOC all have Atlanta regional offices, Professor Paul Zwier writes in an editorial co-written with Reuben Guttman 85L. "Atlanta is not just a center of international trade, it is also a center for compliance enforcement. With the growth of multinational corporations whose businesses are not defined by geographic boundaries, government agencies and their regional offices that enforce compliance must leverage limited resources to maintain a watchful eye and enforce the laws. Today, this may mean collection of evidence abroad."

Guttman: The American election spectacle, something to behold

Guttman: The American election spectacle, something to behold

Emory Law Adjunct Professor Reuben Guttman 85L considers the strange landscape of a presidential election year, which includes both the Republican and Democratic field of candidates and the responsibilities of the outgoing incumbent.

Religious dietary requirements for prisoners? Bloomberg quotes Goldfeder

Religious dietary requirements for prisoners? Bloomberg quotes Goldfeder

Emory Law Senior Lecturer Mark Goldfeder says he doubts the U.S. Supreme Court would accept an appeal involving a Muslim inmate in Michigan who sued prison officials for violating his First Amendment free exercise rights. He allegedly received only 1,300 calories per day during Ramadan. "I would be surprised if the Court took it because it is less about qualified immunity and more about defining the underlying right," Goldfeder says.

Michael J. Broyde

Broyde for CNN: Obama should nominate Posner for Supreme Court

President Barack Obama has several options when nominating the next U.S. Supreme Court justice, Emory Law Professor Michael Broyde writes for CNN. But 7th U.S. Circuit Judge Richard Posner is "the Michael Jordan of law," Broyde says. "The President should appoint a leading legal mind at the end of his career. Posner is a leading intellectual light of the past half-century in law."

Laurie R. Blank

Blank: Tough talk on torture violates America's stance against inhumanity

Presidential candidate Donald Trump has declared waterboarding would be merely an introductory interrogation technique, Director of the International Humanitarian Law Clinic Laurie Blank writes in an op-ed for The Hill. "The dangers of this rhetoric are enormous. Torture is illegal," she says. "Tough talk of torture, enhanced interrogation techniques and carpet-bombing may make good campaign copy, but such rhetoric and acts not only violate the law, but ultimately undermine the very essence of leadership and morality."

Coke could win 'zero' trademark war, Holbrook tells AJC

Coke could win 'zero' trademark war, Holbrook tells AJC

For more than a decade Coca-Cola has sought trademark rights for the word "zero" in relation to beverages--especially soft drinks. The company has a decent shot at winning, but it's not altogether clear, Emory Law Professor Tim Holbrook tells the AJC. Numbers can be trademarked in some situations, Holbrook said. "It's harder to win trademark protection for a word that is descriptive (like the word 'beer' for the name of a beer) than it is for one that is merely suggestive and requires a further leap in thinking," AJC reporter Matt Kempner writes.

CNN quotes Cleaver on 50th anniversary of Black Panther Party

CNN quotes Cleaver on 50th anniversary of Black Panther Party

CNN's John Blake interviewed Emory Law Senior Lecturer Kathleen Cleaver about the continuing influence of the Black Panther Party, a half century since its founding. Cleaver isn't surprised some of the same battles the Panthers fought 50 years ago still exist, Blake writes. "The use of extralegal brutal violence and terrorism against black people seems to be a key part of the American experience," Cleaver says. "It didn't end with the Civil War, World I, or Vietnam. I'm not surprised that it hasn't ended now."

Robert A. Schapiro

Dean Schapiro: Scalia a conservative champion of originalism, textualism

Emory Law Dean Robert Schapiro, who clerked at the Supreme Court during the late Justice Antonin Scalia's tenure, considers the conservative judge's legacy. "Justice Scalia's opinions, full of erudition, wit, and occasional vitriol, will long be quoted and will fill the pages of legal textbooks," Schapiro writes, in an opinion article for The Conversation. "But the memorable opinions will largely be dissents."

Volunteer Clinic offers veterans casual consultations at Starbucks

Volunteer Clinic offers veterans casual consultations at Starbucks

Every other Monday beginning Feb. 22, a portion of the Starbucks near the new Ponce City Market in Atlanta will become a law office for veterans. The Emory Law Volunteer Clinic for Veterans will offer Military Mondays, free legal advice to veterans looking for representation on everything from service-related disability claims to pension issues.

Scalia will be remembered for more than fiery dissents, Volokh says

Scalia will be remembered for more than fiery dissents, Volokh says

Justice Antonin Scalia's pointed retorts will be read and quoted for a long time, Emory Law Associate Professor Alexander Volokh tells 11 Alive News. But there was more to the late justice than his conservatism, he adds. "It's important to remember that he made an important mark on areas that are not liberal or conservative at all," Volokh said. "For example, he was always a very strong proponent of strict separation of powers."

Guttman comments on Clinton's Goldman Sachs connections

Guttman comments on Clinton's Goldman Sachs connections

Adjunct Professor Reuben Guttman 85L wrote recently on the New Hampshire primary and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's acceptance of $675,000 in speaking fees from Goldman Sachs. "Clinton claims that in accepting these speaking fees--and she was paid by Wall Street institutions other than Goldman--her votes or opinions were not influenced. Really? How can she be so sure?"

Daily Report slideshow features EPIC Inspiration Award winners

Daily Report slideshow features EPIC Inspiration Award winners

See a photo slideshow from the Emory Public Interest Committee's Inspiration Awards, featuring honorees from EPIC's 20th annual awards ceremony held at Emory Law Feb. 2. The awards and honorees are: Edward J. "Jack" Hardin, founding partner, Rogers & Hardin LLP (Lifetime Commitment to Public Service Award); Sally Quillian Yates, deputy attorney general, U.S. Department of Justice (Outstanding Leadership in the Public Interest Award); The Hon. Peggy H. Walker, chief judge, Juvenile Court of Douglas County (Unsung Devotion to Those Most in Need Award); and, Hana Shatila16L (3L Outstanding Commitment to Public Service Award).

Frank J.  Vandall

Vandall: Constitutional challenges to Georgia's 'Safe Carry Protection Act'

The Georgia Legislature recently passed a bill that permits carrying guns in restaurants, churches and school parking lots. The "Safe Carry Protection Act" allows individuals to carry firearms almost anywhere in Georgia, Emory Law Professor Frank Vandall writes in the Daily Report. "As long as the proprietor does not forbid it, firearms may be carried in restaurants, bars and churches. Firearms are prohibited within 150 feet of a polling place, on the premises of a nuclear power facility, inside state mental health facilities, and inside a school building," Vandall writes.

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash writes for The Hill on implications of James v. City of Boise

The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous summary reversal in the Idaho case might at first blush seem "of little interest and practical importance," says Emory Law Professor Jonathan Nash. But the case has ramifications elsewhere, including Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore's recent administrative order to state probate courts to not issue marriage certificates to same-sex couples, despite the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Obergefell v. Hodges.

Smith comments on children of immigrants seeking in-state tuition

Smith comments on children of immigrants seeking in-state tuition

Visiting Professor Fred Smith Jr. was interviewed on WABE 90.1 about a recent Georgia Supreme Court decision involving students who say protection against deportation under the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program supports their claim. Smith and WABE's Denis O'Hayer discussed how sovereign immunity influences the students' argument that they are eligible to pay in-state college tuition rates.