Emory Law News Center

December 2017 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Udolf's client only defendant acquitted thus far in FIFA scandal

Udolf's client only defendant acquitted thus far in FIFA scandal

Manuel Burga, former president of Peru's soccer federation, was the first person to be acquitted among over 40 people and entities in the soccer world who were charged with a scheme to extract hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes and kickbacks. Of those, 24 pleaded guilty. Burga was cleared of a single racketeering conspiracy charge. He was represented by Bruce Udolf 79L. A former prosecutor, Udolf is now president of his own firm, where he concentrates his practice in white-collar criminal defense, investigations and corporate compliance.

Brown tells CNN: GOP tax plan is no gift for the middle class

Brown tells CNN: GOP tax plan is no gift for the middle class

Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown was interviewed on CNN about the pending GOP tax plan, in a segment titled "critics blast GOP tax plan as giant cut for the rich." She was asked whether the middle class would benefit. "Absolutely not," she said. "This is designed to put money in the pockets of shareholders, which tend to be very high-income." While tax cuts for individuals would expire after eight years, corporate tax cuts would be permanent, she said.

New election is 'extraordinary remedy' when results are contested, Kang says

New election is 'extraordinary remedy' when results are contested, Kang says

Atlanta mayoral candidate Mary Norwood has challenged the outcome of the Dec. 5 runoff, citing votes from recently annexed parts of the city that she argues should not have been counted. Professor Michael Kang was quoted by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution: "Ordering a new election is an extraordinary remedy that's normally not done," he said. "You'd have to show it cast enough doubt that it's impossible to reconstruct without having to have a new vote altogether. And that burden is high."

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash: Jones' win in Alabama may affect Trump's federal judicial nominees

Doug Jones' win in the recent special election for Alabama's U.S. senator is likely to have an immediate effect on the Trump White House's freedom in selecting nominees for the federal bench. "Now, with the Republican Senate majority reduced to one," the Trump Administration must consider "the loss of two Republican Senators will doom a nomination," Professor Jonathan Nash writes for The Hill.

Jonathan R. Nash

AEDPA's stringency stifles ideological differences, Nash writes

The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) was enacted in 1996, principally to circumscribe the scope of federal habeas corpus review, Professor Jonathan Nash writes for The Hill. "In AEDPA's wake, federal habeas relief will not be available merely because the federal habeas court disagrees with the state court's adjudication. For a federal habeas court to intervene, it must be the case that the state court adjudication was inconsistent not just with some general understanding of the 'clearly established law' at the time, but rather with law that was at the time clearly established by the U.S. Supreme Court," the op-ed reads.

Cloud: RICO suit against Weinstein could yield treble damages

Cloud: RICO suit against Weinstein could yield treble damages

Six women filed a proposed class-action lawsuit against Harvey Weinstein and associated companies, alleging that their coordinated efforts to cover up a pattern of egregious sexual misconduct amounts to racketeering. Successful RICO suits come with significantly higher damages, Emory Law Professor Morgan Cloud told Business Insider. "If they win, they are entitled to recover treble damages--three times their actual damages--and their costs of litigation, including attorneys' fees," he said.

Volokh in Daily Report: Nude dancing a form of free speech

Volokh in Daily Report: Nude dancing a form of free speech

The Georgia Association of Club Executives have sued state officials over a new tax on strip clubs, asking it be declared unconstitutional. Those lawyers engaged Emory Law Associate Professor Alexander Volokh as a consultant. "I do think there is a good First Amendment argument against the law," he said, adding the U.S. Supreme Court has "recognized in many cases that nude dancing is a form of speech that gets some protection. The question is, just how much protection does it get?"

Alexander Volokh

Volokh: Emory earns 'green light' for commitment to free speech

Emory Law Professor Associate Professor Alexander Volokh writes about Emory University's "green light" status for its commitment to free speech and open expression on campus in his latest Washington Post op-ed. Emory University received a "green-light" free-speech rating from The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE).

Goldfeder on the rise of 'robot rights'

Goldfeder on the rise of 'robot rights'

Artificial intelligence is progressing swiftly, and "scholars already imagine a time when robots and intelligent machines may deserve--and be accorded--some sort of rights," says a recent article in NBC's MACH. Senior Lecturer Mark Goldfeder is quoted: "I have a responsibility to treat all that seem human as humans, and it is better to err on the side of caution from an ethical perspective," he said.