Emory Law News Center

January 2018 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Waldman: Proposal to punish parents for children's crimes misguided

Waldman: Proposal to punish parents for children's crimes misguided

A City of South Fulton councilwoman has proposed a controversial law that could send parents to jail and fine them for their children 's crimes. Paul Howard, the Fulton County district attorney, said in a statement that he thought the proposal could be unconstitutional. "It's hurting the wrong person," said Randee Waldman, director of Emory Law's Barton Juvenile Defender Clinic. "They're not standing next to their kids while they're committing crimes."

AI can play positive role in end-of-days scenario, Goldfeder says

AI can play positive role in end-of-days scenario, Goldfeder says

Artificial intelligence is is already being adopted for military use, raising questions as to what role the technology will play in the end-of-days, says a Breaking Israel News story. Although AI poses many ethical and theological questions, Emory Law Senior Lecturer Mark Goldfeder says the development of technology was in fact intended by God to be part of man¿s role in being a partner with God in Creation.

Dudziak: 1968 marks a judicial watershed

Dudziak: 1968 marks a judicial watershed

The year 1968 was tumultuous--the continuing war in Vietnam, political protests and the assassinations of Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. But it also marked a judicial sea change. Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law Mary Dudziak is quoted in Political News on the end of the Warren U.S. Supreme Court, which handed down landmark decisions including Brown v. Board of Education. "It's just a tremendously important moment in Supreme Court history," Dudziak said of 1968. "It's the beginning of that turn away from this era of expansive liberalism."

Court's message in N.C. gerrymandering case is strong, Kang says

Court's message in N.C. gerrymandering case is strong, Kang says

This week's decision by a panel of three federal judges in a North Carolina gerrymandering case sends a warning against all such partisan efforts, including in Georgia, Emory Law Professor Michael Kang tells WABE. The judges found that Republicans had illegally drawn North Carolina's congressional district map to give GOP candidates "a solid advantage for most of the seats," NPR reports. "For the most part, whoever controlled state government thought they could gerrymander on a partisan basis," Kang said. "So I think that sort of license to do whatever you want in gerrymandering is put on hold."

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash: When judges move, where do they go?

An opinion article concerning lateral moves by judges, by Emory Law Professor Jonathan Nash, was published in the Los Angeles Daily Journal. The subscriber-only op-ed was based on Nash's 2017 article in the Vanderbilt Law Journal, which you may read by following the link.