Emory Law News Center

February 2018 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

U.S. Senate confirms Branch 94L for seat on 11th Circuit

U.S. Senate confirms Branch 94L for seat on 11th Circuit

On Tuesday, the U.S. Senate easily confirmed Elizabeth "Lisa" Branch 94L to the Atlanta-based 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. Senators voted 73-23 to seat Branch on the 12-judge panel, which has jurisdiction over Georgia, Alabama and Florida.

Carter comments on case involving years of alleged sexual abuse

Carter comments on case involving years of alleged sexual abuse

Melissa Carter, executive director of Emory Law's Barton Child Law and Policy Center, was quoted in an Atlanta Journal-Constitution story that alleges a volunteer coach with the Pope High School wrestling program sexually abused young boys for years, despite one mother's efforts to have him arrested. In 2017, the coach pleaded guilty to sexually abusing two boys in Pennsylvania. Carter said there appeared to be multiple occasions when adults in positions of responsibility for children failed them. "The law itself is just a minimum, and often the law doesn't answer for us what the ethical or moral thing to do is," Carter said. "We all, as adults, should be aware of the signs and symptoms of abuse."

NY Times: Meet Atlanta's #BillionDollarLawyer, Findling 84L

NY Times: Meet Atlanta's #BillionDollarLawyer, Findling 84L

Drew Findling 84L has gained some renown as a courtroom killer for an array of high-profile acts. But he has also taken on the role of a mentor, and even a father figure, to some clients as they try to outrun societal disadvantages (and youthful recklessness) in favor of fame. "It is increasingly disturbing to me, the 'X' that is on the forehead of people in this industry," Findling tells The New York Times. "There's such a target on these young guys," he said. "Every once in a while someone is going to make a mistake. But no one looks at all the good that comes out of what they do."

At Emory Law: A conversation with Justice Sotomayor

At Emory Law: A conversation with Justice Sotomayor

It's important for citizens to participate in the lawmaking process by lobbying for changes they want to see, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor said Tuesday at Emory Law, during an appearance that included a conversation with her former law clerk, Professor Fred Smith Jr. "I believe with all my heart that unless we become engaged in our country and become active participants in making a difference in the world we're in, that we will be nothing but bystanders otherwise, and nobody should live their life being a bystander," she said.

Daily Report: Sotomayor works the room at Emory

Daily Report: Sotomayor works the room at Emory

The late Justice William Brennan is said to have described the secret to success on the U.S. Supreme Court with five fingers outstretched. With five votes on a nine-member court, a justice could do anything, Jonathan Ringel writes for the Daily Report. Justice Sonia Sotomayor suggested a similar approach when she told a packed Emory University audience Tuesday how she handles harsh criticism of her opinions. Of colleagues who have occasionally blasted one of her positions, she said, "I could have strangled them, but I need their vote for the next case."

Georgia adoption laws overdue for an update, Carter says

Georgia adoption laws overdue for an update, Carter says

Proposed changes to Georgia's adoption laws are overdue, says Barton Child Law and Policy Center Executive Director Melissa Carter. Changes include shortening the time a birth mother can change her mind after signing adoption documents from 10 to four days, and allowing adoptive parents to reimburse the birth mother for basic living expenses during the pregnancy. Present laws haven't been updated since 1990. "Prospective adoptive parents will look to adopt children in other states where the laws are more friendly," Carter said. "This bill is a necessary and overdue modernization of our adoption laws."

Ani B. Satz

VW monkey experiments cruel, but we are to blame, Satz says

The diesel exhaust experiments Volkswagen performed with monkeys were cruel, but hardly unusual in the corporate world, Emory Law Professor Ani Satz writes for The Hill. "Corporate behavior that seeks to maximize profits outside ethical decision-making often involves fraud, environmental harm, and harm to humans and animals because it entails complete disregard for obligations to stakeholders other than shareholders," she writes.