Emory Law News Center

August 2018 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Dinner quoted on Georgia's #MeToo problem

Dinner quoted on Georgia's #MeToo problem

Despite heightened attention across the nation on sexual harassment, Georgia has no consistent system for investigating complaints. The state also can't say how many of its nearly 70,000 employees have filed complaints recently, because it has no centralized system for tracking them, according to a recent investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution. Emory Law Professor Deborah Dinner was asked to examine documentation of a Georgia Patrol secretary's case, and found "plenty to suggest that the officers' behavior ... was harassing," the story says. "It does seem like men were routinely sexualizing her," Dinner said.

Immigration law clinic founded with help from Emory Law

Immigration law clinic founded with help from Emory Law

A new, free immigration law clinic has launched in the Atlanta area, thanks to a partnership between Emory Law, local immigration attorneys and the Mormon Church. Emory Law students perform intake and then route advice-seekers to volunteer lawyers for on-the-spot consultations about their immigration questions. More-complex cases go to local firms or nonprofits. "We have substantial needs here, and the Atlanta Immigration Court is not so favorable to immigrants," said Assistant Dean for Public Service Rita Sheffey.

Brown on candidate Abrams' IRS debt: It's not uncommon

Brown on candidate Abrams' IRS debt: It's not uncommon

Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp has targeted Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams over her $54,000 debt to the IRS. Abrams says she's paying it back. Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown, an expert on tax law, told WABE: "Its' fairly common for the IRS and taxpayers to work out debt. You agree to a payment plan, you keep the payments up, everybody's happy." She also questioned whether the attacks will resonate with voters. "You're not going to necessarily make headway with the average American that is in debt," she said.

Dinner: Everyone cares about pregnancy discrimination, but for different reasons

Dinner: Everyone cares about pregnancy discrimination, but for different reasons

Decades after Roe v. Wade, both the political left and right are concerned about workplace pregnancy, but for vastly different reasons, Professor Deborah Dinner tells The Atlantic. She discusses the lesser-known 1974 case, Geduldig v. Aiello. "Businesses used the notion of reproductive autonomy to characterize pregnancy as a private choice with private costs, Dinner writes, so feminist, labor, and civil rights groups chose to emphasize that childbearing was in fact a public need and a social good."