LLM Concentrations

The flexible LLM program allows you to customize coursework to fit your professional goals. You will join students from Emory Law’s JD and graduate programs in foundational and elective courses you choose based on your individual areas of interest and expertise.

The LLM concentration in child law and policy offers students the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the formulation and application of policies and laws affecting children.

Students can choose between two tracks: (1) a theorytrack involving a substantial research paper prepared under the supervision of a faculty member with expertise in theory or (2) a policy track, involving a policy project conducted under the supervision of the Barton Child Law and Policy Center faculty and others with expertise in policy and legislative development. Students enrolled in this concentration must complete a total of 24 credit hours, consisting of course work and either a substantial research paper or an equivalent policy project.

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys

Students pursuing an LLM at Emory have the unique opportunity through general study to design a curriculum based on their unique set of experiences and interests.

Emory Law provides a wide array of courses in various areas of specialization, based on the broad expertise of our faculty. Through the LLM program, students have the opportunity to complete a master of laws in an area of academic concentration chosen by each student, including health law, intellectual property, environmental law, international law, tax law, law and development, and others. By pursuing the general studies track, students have the flexibility to select coursework in any area and are required to spend a minimum of two semesters in residency at Emory Law and successfully complete 24 credit hours of course work. Each LLM student pursuing general study will work closely with an academic advisor to design a curriculum that will meet the student’s academic needs.

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys

The LLM concentration in human rights law offers students the opportunity to explore the theory and practice of human rights law in the national and/or international context.

Students enrolled in this concentration must complete the required courses and a substantial dissertation. In view of the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the human rights field, students will be able to complete their required credit hours by selecting from a wide range of courses at Emory Law. 

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys

LLM candidates in law and religion will be residents at Emory Law and in the Center for the Study of Law and Religion »

While resident in the center, candidates will interact with law and religion faculty, staff, and students; participate in the center’s public forums and research projects; and be eligible to apply for center research fellowships and internships.

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion is dedicated to studying the religious dimensions of law, the legal dimensions of religion, and the interaction of legal and religious ideas and institutions, norms, and practices. This study is predicated on the assumption that religion gives law its spirit and inspires its adherence to ritual and justice. Law gives religion its structure and encourages its devotion to order and organization. Law and religion share such ideas as fault, obligation, and covenant and such methods as ethics, rhetoric, and textual interpretation. Law and religion also balance each other by counterpoising justice and mercy, rule and equity, discipline and love. This dialectical interaction gives these two disciplines and dimensions of life their vitality and their strength. Without law, religion slowly slides into shallow spiritualism. Without religion, law gradually decays into empty formalism.

The center has emerged over the past 27 years as a major scholarly initiative. Its work is interdisciplinary in perspective, seeking to bring the wisdom of religious traditions into greater conversation with law, public policy, and the social sciences. It is interreligious in inspiration, seeking to compare the legal teachings and practices of various religious traditions, especially Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It is also international in orientation, seeking to situate American debates over interdisciplinary legal and religious issues within an emerging global conversation.

Besides the LLM concentration in law and religion, Emory offers

  • Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD)
  • Three joint-degree programs (JD/MDiv, JD/MTS, JD/PhD)
  • 35 courses (listed under "Requirements")
  • Nine major research projects
  • Two to four annual public forums
  • A triennial international conference
  • Two book series
  • 300-plus published volumes
  • 95 Emory senior fellows and associated faculty from 20 fields of study
  • 1,600 corresponding members from around the world

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys

The LLM concentration in public law and regulation offers students the opportunity to explore the modern regulatory state and the political, legislative, and administrative processes that create and control regulatory bodies of law. 

Central areas of study include the interplay of law and politics in our constitutional and regulatory systems, the complex dynamic of business regulation in the United States, and emerging issues about the nature and role of transnational regulation.

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys

Degree Requirements

  1. Two semesters of residency as a full-time student
  2. 24 credit hours (course work plus optional substantial paper) consisting of the following courses and programs:

Foundational Academic Courses

Students must complete 11 credit hours in the following required courses.

  • Administrative Law (3 credits)
  • Constitutional Law (4 credits)
  • Legislation & Regulation (2 credits)

Additional Coursework

Students can secure the remaining 13 required credits by drawing on a wide selection of relevant courses in the JD curriculum or other Emory University graduate courses approved by the academic adviser. Subject to faculty approval, any course incorporating significant public law elements would be permissible as an elective, depending on the student’s particular interests. These include Securities Regulation, Environmental Law, Intellectual Property, Food & Drug Law, Immigration, Health Law, and others. 

For example, students interested in securities regulation, intellectual property, or law and religion might draw from the following (partial) lists of available courses for their additional courses:

Securities Regulation

  • Accounting for Lawyers (2 credits)
  • Banking Law (3 credits)
  • Business Associations (4 credits)
  • Corporate Finance (3 credits)
  • Corporate Practice (3 credits)
  • Doing Deals (selected courses)
  • Federal Income Taxation: Corporations (3 credits)
  • Mergers and Acquisitions (3 credits)
  • Securities Regulation (3 credits)

Intellectual Property

  • Computer Law (2 credits)
  • Copyright Law (3 credits)
  • Fundamentals of Innovations (two courses) (3 credits)
  • Intellectual Property (3 credits)
  • Patent Law (3 credits)
  • Patent Practice & Procedure (2 credits)
  • The Role of Patents

Law and Religion

  • Advanced Constitutional Law (2 credits)
  • Advanced Religious Liberty
  • Constitutional Law: Religion and State (3 credits)
  • History of Canon Law (2 credits)
  • History of Church/State Relations in the West
  • Islamic Law (3 credits)
  • Jewish Law (3 credits)

Optional Research Paper (4 credits)

Students may complete four of their 13 additional credits by preparing a research paper of 15,000 to 16,000 words, under the supervision of a public law and regulation faculty member. 

Emory Law is the US leader in training students in transactional law, defined broadly as the skills and knowledge needed by lawyers working in business and commercial settings.

Located in the dynamic city of Atlanta—the business, commercial, and governmental capital of the southeastern United States—Emory offers a particularly rich set of courses for students interested in a business and commercial practice. The LLM concentration in transactional law is distinctive because of the core of experiential course requirements, supplemented by a group of more traditional courses that provide a foundation to the transactional setting.

The courses are taught by both experienced practicing attorneys who are leaders in their fields and full-time faculty who emphasize the practical side of transactional law. “Doing Deals” courses focus almost entirely on learning for practice. Capstone courses, such as Emory’s “Mergers and Acquisitions Workshop,” provide opportunities for advanced experiential learning in specialized areas of the law. Because students have taken the required skills courses, the capstone courses are conducted at a more sophisticated level than would otherwise be possible.

Students enrolled in this concentration must complete a total of 24 credit hours. In lieu of one course, a student may undertake research and writing on a topic of the student’s choice, subject to approval and availability of a faculty member who will supervise the project.

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys

The LLM concentration in vulnerability and the human condition allows in-depth exploration of the various manifestations of vulnerability found in both human beings and the societal institutions they create.

Vulnerability theory encompasses consideration of the concept of universal and constant vulnerability and the responsibility of the state to promote policies and laws that foster resilience and equality. For further information about Vulnerability and the Human Condition, please see http://web.gs.emory.edu/vulnerability/

Students enrolled in this concentration must complete a total of 24 credit hours, consisting of course work and either a substantial research paper or an equivalent substantial policy project. Students may choose between two tracks: (1) a vulnerability and the human condition theory track, involving a substantial research paper prepared under the supervision of a faculty member with expertise in theory or (2) a policy track, involving a policy project conducted under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member.

Open to

  • US JD degree holders
  • Foreign-educated attorneys