Emory Law News Center

June 2013 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Robert A. Schapiro

Supreme Court takes middle road in DOMA, Prop 8, Schapiro writes in Monitor

In its two decisions that benefit same-sex marriage, the Supreme Court neither remains silent nor makes a definitive ruling. Instead, it demonstrates its power to participate in ongoing public discourse about a controversial social issue, without drowning out further debate.

Alexander shows communities how to transform abandoned properties

Alexander shows communities how to transform abandoned properties

Emory Law Professor Frank S. Alexander considers it "the litter of a consumptive society" -- the vacant, abandoned, tax-delinquent and foreclosed properties that pock many of today's cityscapes. The nation has long struggled over what to do with problem properties, a growing liability in a still-soft real estate market. And states and municipalities often lack the laws, tools and expertise to do much about it, Alexander asserts.

Charles A. Shanor

Shanor for CNN: "What can the U.S. do about Snowden?"

Edward Snowden, whose disclosures have triggered broad debate over the balance between privacy and national security, has left Hong Kong and is in Moscow, apparently headed to Ecuador.

Mary L. Dudziak

Dudziak for CNN: Fisher ruling leaves courts "outsized role" in setting policy

When the Supreme Court on Monday sent Fisher v. University of Texas, an affirmative action case, back to the lower court for a second look, supporters of race-conscious policies breathed a sigh of relief.

Kang: population shift may matter more than Voting Rights Act ruling

Kang: population shift may matter more than Voting Rights Act ruling

Michael Kang, a professor at Emory University's law school who specializes in election law, says many are concerned that minorities in Georgia now will have a harder time getting elected. But he says it may not matter as the state's population changes. "We're thinking long term here, but if you've got a lot of immigration among Latinos, you've got population growth among African-Americans. And they constitute a voting majority that votes together cohesively, that obviously changes the politics and makes section 5 just unimportant in the larger context."

Perry on likely effects of DOMA ruling on Georgia's same-sex marriage ban

Perry on likely effects of DOMA ruling on Georgia's same-sex marriage ban

Emory Law Professor Michael Perry says the DOMA ruling will likely invite challenges to state same-sex marriage bans. But he doesn't expect those challenges to be filed in Georgia. "My guess is that that's already well underway in other states. So there will be no need to sue in Georgia. The suits will come in other states and eventually one of those suits will get to the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court will hand down a decision that will affect all of the states, including Georgia."

Schapiro Talks With NPR's Totenberg on Supreme Court Affirmative Action Case

Schapiro Talks With NPR's Totenberg on Supreme Court Affirmative Action Case

The U.S. Supreme Court has surprised just about everyone with its decision on affirmative action in higher education. The surprise was an apparent compromise that leaves affirmative action programs intact for now but subjects them to a more rigorous review by the courts. By a 7-to-1 vote, the court largely sidestepped making what could have been a sweeping ruling in a test case from Texas.

Legal scholar reframes the question to find an answer

Legal scholar reframes the question to find an answer

Mary L. Dudziak thinks that to get to the heart of a matter -- in law and in scholarship -- it can be helpful to start at the edges. To understand domestic law, she looks to its global impact; to understand contemporary war, she looks to its past. It is often at the borders between inside and outside, past and present, that we can more fully see the nature of the core.

Washington Post features Shepherd analysis of judges' campaign financing

Washington Post features Shepherd analysis of judges' campaign financing

In the states that don't have lifetime tenure, appointed judges either have to be reappointed after a given period by the governor, legislature, or a judicial nominating committee, or they have to be retained by the people in what's called a "retention election."

Rafael I. Pardo

View your home as cost, not investment, Pardo tells Wall Street Journal

Life will be much less stressful if you think of your home primarily as a consumption cost rather than as an investment. Above all else, make sure that you can afford all of the ownership expenses associated with a home (mortgage, insurance, repairs, etc.).

Mary L. Dudziak

Dudziak's "Law and the Concept of Wartime" published in ABA Journal

Well over a decade after the 2001 terrorist attacks, are we still in a "long war" without an end in sight? Or does the category of "wartime" no longer fit our experience?

Charles A. Shanor

Professor Shanor in New York Times, on civil liberties, surveillance

The revelations this week that the federal government has been scooping up records of telephone calls inside the United States for seven years, and secretly collecting information from Internet companies on foreigners overseas for nearly six years, have elicited predictable outrage from liberals and civil libertarians.

Charles A. Shanor

Shanor in Huffington Post: We shouldn't bash Russia in Boston bombing discussion

Media commentary concerning the heads-up Russia gave the FBI concerning Tamerlan Tsarnaev's ties to Islamic militants is unequivocal:. "If only Russia had disclosed more about his extremist contacts and actions, the FBI might have been able to stop the Boston Marathon bombing." Russia let us down, or so the story goes.