Emory Law News Center

January 2014 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Voting Rights Act changes affect local voting, Kang tells NPR

Voting Rights Act changes affect local voting, Kang tells NPR

It's been almost eight months since the Supreme Court effectively stuck down Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. That section required places with a history of discrimination to get their local voting laws cleared by the federal government.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown in New York Times: The only path for elderly citizens

President Obama put cutting Social Security benefits on the table as a means to reach a deal with Republicans on Capitol Hill. That is a very bad idea. To try to balance the budget off of the backs of our elderly would be taking us in the wrong direction. A better idea would be to repeal the wage cap, which would lessen the regressive nature of the current system.

Kang in the AJC, new cities ignite debate over race

Kang in the AJC, new cities ignite debate over race

Advocates urging the Legislature to allow new cities in DeKalb County point to the success of those recently created in bringing government closer to the people and lowering taxes.

States with "sore loser" laws more likely to be polarized

States with "sore loser" laws more likely to be polarized

Michael S. Kang found that in states with sore-loser laws, congressional candidates were more ideologically distant from one another, that is, more polarized than in states without them.

Olens 83L says sex trafficking of minors is not a rarity in Georgia

Olens 83L says sex trafficking of minors is not a rarity in Georgia

The sex trafficking of minors placed Georgia in the national spotlight after a FBI lists of cities with a high incidence of the crime included Atlanta. WABE's Rose Scott profiles Georgia¿s current attorney general Sam Olens.

Martha Albertson Fineman

Fineman, Feminism and Legal Theory Project mark 30 years

For more than 30 years, the Feminism and Legal Theory (FLT) Project has fostered interdisciplinary examinations of the ways in which the interaction of law and culture shapes expectations, policies and practices related to gender.

Frank S.  Alexander

Alexander tells NYTimes bargain realty deals carry a few caveats

Duffy Realty of Atlanta, one of a growing number of real estate agencies tries new pricing strategies, an upfront listing fee of $500 and one third of 1 percent when a house sells. Duffy said the agency¿s 2013 revenue was $5.3 million.

Holbrook tells WSJ gay marriage cases put 10th Circuit in limelight

Holbrook tells WSJ gay marriage cases put 10th Circuit in limelight

A sleepy court is about to get its turn in the limelight. The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appels in Denver, one of the nation's 13th federal appeals courts, doesn't have firebrand judges and isn't routinely reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Carter says speed of foster care fix troubling

Carter says speed of foster care fix troubling

A plan to put private organizations in charge of Georgia¿s approximately 7,000 foster children is moving too fast for some child advocates who want more study before overhauling the system.

Law school alums take it to the extreme (sports that is)

Law school alums take it to the extreme (sports that is)

The changing job market has inspired some Emory Law alumni to leverage their law school education, their personal interests and their entrepreneurial spirit into nontraditional careers.

Holbrook assesses federal appeals court appointees

Holbrook assesses federal appeals court appointees

With six appointees to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, President Barack Obama has reshaped what some patent lawyers consider the most important court in the world. The six additions are comparable to four new justices joining the U.S. Supreme Court or more than a dozen being added to the Ninth Circuit.

Vandall says malpractice reform could backfire

Vandall says malpractice reform could backfire

There have been quiet visits to doctors' offices, expensive pitches sent to voters' doorsteps and big money pouring in from all sides, all over a proposal that's likely a longshot to win legislative approval this year.

Holbrook tells WSJ new legislation not needed to solve patent problems

Holbrook tells WSJ new legislation not needed to solve patent problems

Few areas in the law have garnered more attention in recent years than that relating to patents. What will 2014 bring? Lots more news, in all likelihood.

Student loan creditors use bulldog tactics, Pardo says in New York Times

Student loan creditors use bulldog tactics, Pardo says in New York Times

Before she became ill, Ms. Jorgensen took out $43,000 in student loans. As her payments piled up along with medical bills, she took the unusual step of filing for bankruptcy, requiring legal proof of undue hardship.