Emory Law News Center

January 2015 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Attorney representing hospital where father practices isn't a conflict, Terrell says

Attorney representing hospital where father practices isn't a conflict, Terrell says

On the surface, Georgia State Rep. Tom Weldon's representation of the hospital where his father serves as board chairman does not present a conflict of interest. Tom Weldon wants the hospital to succeed, wrote the Chattanooga Times Free-Press. So does his father, physician Darrell Weldon. "If difficulties later arise, they can be confronted," said Emory Law Professor Timothy Terrell, who specializes in professional responsibility. "This does not appear to be any kind of 'unconsentable' conflict, like trying to represent both sides in a divorce case."

Cleaver discusses new Black Panther film at Sundance Festival

Cleaver discusses new Black Panther film at Sundance Festival

Professor Kathleen Cleaver, who was the Black Panther Party's communications secretary and wife of party leader Eldridge Cleaver, discusses the new film "The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution," with Democracy Now's Amy Goodman. The film's director, Stanley Nelson, was also interviewed on the occasion of the film's premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.

Price examines Ebola, pandemic law with Emory medical experts at Florida "Back to Class"

Price examines Ebola, pandemic law with Emory medical experts at Florida "Back to Class"

On Saturday, January 24, the Emory Alumni Association hosted "Back to Class: South Florida" at the Westin Colonnade Hotel in Coral Gables. The program featured five faculty members sharing expertise on diverse subjects including Ebola, quarantine, infant communication, and the history of Oxford College and Emory.

Brown discusses African Americans' underwater mortgages with Kojo Nnamdi

Brown discusses African Americans' underwater mortgages with Kojo Nnamdi

From the outside, the Fairwood subdivision near Bowie, Maryland, appears to be an African-American success story. The subdivision is 73 percent black, with a median income of $170,000. But many homeowners are underwater on their mortgages. Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown is a guest when Nnamdi talks with a Washington Post reporter who wrote on black wealth and the lingering impact of the housing crisis in the Washington suburbs.

Goldfeder on dismissed Atlanta fire chief's lawsuit: too soon to say

Goldfeder on dismissed Atlanta fire chief's lawsuit: too soon to say

Atlanta's fire chief was dismissed by the mayor after writing a book in which he said homosexuality is "vile." He has filed a federal discrimination complaint against the city in a case that is testing the issue of religious expression in the workplace and mobilizing Christian conservatives to his defense. Professor Mark Goldfeder told the Los Angeles Times it was too early to decide whether the chief had a strong legal case. Americans have the right to express their personal beliefs and Title VII requires reasonable accommodation to do so in the workplace. "But what it doesn't protect is imposing your beliefs on somebody else or making people feel uncomfortable," Goldfeder said.

Brown in Washington Post: African Americans with homes in Prince George's watched wealth vanish

Brown in Washington Post: African Americans with homes in Prince George's watched wealth vanish

In Prince George's County, the nation's highest-income majority-black county, residents have lost far more wealth than families in neighboring, majority-white suburbs. While surrounding counties are enjoying a strong rebound in housing prices, Prince George's lags far behind, and local economists say a full recovery appears unlikely anytime soon. "Regardless of geography, if you own a home in a majority-minority neighborhood, you are going to get less value out of it than if you own a home in a homogeneous white neighborhood," said Dorothy A. Brown, an associate vice provost and law professor at Emory University, who has studied the impact of race on home prices. "This transcends class."

How Atlanta can tackle blight, Alexander tells WABE

How Atlanta can tackle blight, Alexander tells WABE

The City of Atlanta is working to tackle abandoned homes and properties throughout the city, something the city has had a hard time accomplishing because of its current laws, officials said. Frank Alexander, Emory University Law Professor, says Atlanta's current codes are dated and ineffective. "The City of Atlanta, historically, relative to other cities of comparable size, geographically and in population, has underfunded code enforcement activities," he said.

Miller 82L elected to Emory University Board of Trustees

Miller 82L elected to Emory University Board of Trustees

Lee Miller 82L is a managing director with The Glenmede Trust Company, N.A., the independent investment and wealth management firm serving endowments, foundations, family and individual relationships that was originally founded in 1956 to serve as the corporate trustee and fiduciary of The Pew Trusts. Miller is on the Dean's Advisory Committee at Emory University School of Law. In addition, she is a docent at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and serves on the Museum's Professional Advisory Council. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Preservation League of New York State.

Laurie R. Blank

Blank for Jurist: The limits of inviolability: U.N. facilities during armed conflict

"When terrorists and armed groups use protected sites and facilities as headquarters, weapons storage and launch sites, what should be important immunity for protected sites becomes unwarranted and unjustified immunity for fighters violating the fundamental tenets of the law of war," Blank writes. "Understanding the parameters--and limits--of inviolability for protected sites is therefore crucial to applying the law effectively to protect civilians and ensure lawful military operations."

Joanna M. Shepherd

Shepherd study of judicial fundraising cited in McClatchey analysis of upcoming Supreme Court case

Conservative Supreme Court justices sounded skeptical Tuesday about Florida's ban on judicial candidates personally soliciting campaign contributions, setting up another closely divided decision over money and political speech. ""ustice shall not be sold, nor shall it be denied," Breyer said. "That's at least 800 years old." Roberts retorted, "Eight hundred years ago, judges were not elected." The rules are important because of the flood of money entering judicial races. From 1990 to 1999, judicial candidates raised about $83.3 million. But over the next 10, they raised $206.9 million, according to a study by Professor Joanna Shepherd.

Michael J. Perry

Supreme Court likely to rule for same-sex marriage, Perry says

Michael Perry, an Emory Law professor and constitutional expert, says that same-sex marriage will be legal nationwide this year.

Stark advocates for legal curriculum reform

Stark advocates for legal curriculum reform

During a keynote address for Emory Law's Center for Transactional Law and Practice conference, Tina Stark focused on what she views as essential law school curriculum reforms.

Melissa D. Carter

Carter appointed to Georgia Commission on Family Violence

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal has appointed Melissa Carter to the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. Carter is clinical professor of law and director of the Emory Law Barton Child Law and Policy Center.

Timothy R. Holbrook

Holbrook looks forward to Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage

Emory Law professor Tim Holbrook is supportive of the Supreme Court's decision to address the constitutionality of same sex marriage bans.

Timothy R. Holbrook

Holbrook in WSJ: Kennedy, Roberts could create 6-3 vote for same-sex marriage

Tim Holbrook, a professor at Emory Law, said he thinks it's possible, though unlikely, that Chief Justice Roberts would vote with liberal members of the Supreme Court bench.

Dudziak in New York Magazine: Forecasting Obama's presidential legacy

Dudziak in New York Magazine: Forecasting Obama's presidential legacy

The magazine polled 53 historians, including Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Law Mary L. Dudziak on how Obama's presidency will be viewed two decades from now. "How much will Obama's being black matter in the end?" the magazine asked. "Race will still matter. Twenty years from now, children will learn in school that Barack Obama was the first nonwhite U.S. president," Dudziak says. "Some will see Obama's presidency as showing that the early-21st century was a moment of progress, in spite of continuing racial inequality and uproar over police killings of unarmed people of color." The best thing he could do for his legacy? Close Guant√°namo.