Emory Law News Center

November 2015 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Price on Syrian refugees: Immigration process is rigorous

Price on Syrian refugees: Immigration process is rigorous

Professor Polly Price commented on the story of Jamil, a Syrian who fled the civil war and spent two-and-a-half years trying to immigrate to the United States. He arrived in Georgia the day of the Paris terror attacks. "We don't take for granted they are who they say they are," Price said. "We get into the weeds. 'Tell me about your village. Where did you live? What do you do for a living?' Then [resettlement agents] will repeat it several days later to make sure their story doesn't change."

Deal 's decision to bar Syrian refugees in Georgia unconstitutional, Price says

Deal 's decision to bar Syrian refugees in Georgia unconstitutional, Price says

Last week, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal was among at least 30 U.S. governors who have asked to bar Syrian refugees from resettling in their states. The ACLU has filed suit against Indiana's governor, and is considering similar lawsuits in other states. Emory Law Professor Polly Price agrees with the ACLU that the policy violates the Equal Protection Clause. "You're identifying a group based on national origin, or religion," she said. "These are protected grounds under both the federal and state constitution."

Challenge to judicial appointments won't affect present judges, Nash says

Challenge to judicial appointments won't affect present judges, Nash says

A group of lawyers is suing Gov. Nathan Deal, saying the three judges he recently appointed to Georgia's Court of Appeals should have been elected, WABE reports. Professor Jonathan Nash said it's unlikely, even if a judge decides the appointments weren't legal, that the challenge would affect the eight other appointed judges or their past rulings. "Once the appointees take their seats on the court, it's kind of too late. You can't unscramble the egg," he said.

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im

An-Na'im on how Islamic law can take on ISIS, in The Conversation

The vast majority of Muslims feel moral revulsion and outrage about the violence perpetrated by ISIS, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im writes for The Conversation. "However, the truth of the matter is that ISIS leaders and supporters can and do draw on a wealth of scriptural and historical sources to justify their actions," he says. "ISIS' claim of Islamic legitimacy can be countered only by a viable alternative interpretation of Islamic law."

Melissa D. Carter

Carter on GPB: It's time to revisit 'get-tough' juvenile offender laws

More than 100 Georgia minors under the age of 18 are in adult prisons. That's due to Georgia's so-called "seven deadly sins" law, which is shorthand for the seven charges that vault juveniles to adult court. The approach was meant to deal with kids who were becoming "super-predators." Melissa Carter, who leads Emory Law's Child Law and Policy Center, says it's time to revisit get-tough on youthful offender laws.

Yahoo: Velikonja's review suggests that SEC inflates its numbers

Yahoo: Velikonja's review suggests that SEC inflates its numbers

In September, Urska Velikonja, an associate professor of law at Emory, reviewed 15 years of enforcement actions and published the draft of a paper in which she wrote that the SEC's "widely circulated statistics are invalid because they do not measure what they purport to measure, and unreliable because they can be manipulated all too easily."

The Economist: Velikonja calls into question SEC enforcement data

The Economist: Velikonja calls into question SEC enforcement data

Every October, the SEC tots up its legal accomplishments for the year and releases the data to the public, usually with a press release suggesting it is becoming ever tougher on corporate crooks. Yet research by Urska Velikonja, a professor at Emory University, calls these numbers into question.

Pardo: What determines "undue hardship" for student loan debt?

Pardo: What determines "undue hardship" for student loan debt?

In all but the rarest circumstances, people who declare bankruptcy still have to repay their student debt, Bloomberg reports. The Education Department can deny people bankruptcy if its lawyers can show that debtors are spending too much on such things as fast food, cable television, or even their pension plans. "When we focus so much on the minutia of each and every individual expense, it can become a distracting sideshow where we aren't really answering the big picture question, which is, is there any ability to repay the amounts that are owed?" says Professor Rafael Pardo.