Emory Law News Center

December 2015 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Dudziak for Politico: Obama can learn from George Washington

Dudziak for Politico: Obama can learn from George Washington

Politico asked several historians, "Which president had the best last year in office?" Emory Law Professor Mary Dudziak says President George Washington made a powerful choice in not seeking a third term (which is now a constitutional requirement). Obama can lead by choosing not to act, she says. "Instead of bypassing Congress, if Obama refused to project American military force in Iraq, Syria or elsewhere without an authorization from Congress, it would set a striking example and serve as a powerful legacy," Dudziak writes.

Carter cites Witte's book as one of the year's best, in Bloomberg View

Carter cites Witte's book as one of the year's best, in Bloomberg View

Yale Law Professor Stephen Carter chose John Witte Jr.'s book, The Western Case for Monogamy Over Polygamy, as one of seven of the best histories of the year. "[It's] an important book for those who want to support same-sex marriage but worry about the slippery slope," Carter writes in his column for Bloomberg View. Witte is director of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion.

Vandall quoted by International Business Times on VW emissions case

Vandall quoted by International Business Times on VW emissions case

In December, Volkswagen announced Ken Feinberg will administer an alternative dispute resolution program related to charges the automaker cheated on its emissions reporting. "What¿s strong about Feinberg's program is that it's economically comparable to what someone would get through litigation, where at least 25 percent of the money goes to an attorney," said Emory Law Professor Frank Vandall, who specializes in product liability litigation. "And it can take 10 years before you get a penny."

Stat profiles Guttman 85L for work versus big pharma

Stat profiles Guttman 85L for work versus big pharma

A Washington lawyer who specializes in prosecuting pharmaceutical fraud, Reuben Guttman 85L has gone after Pfizer, Abbott, GlaxoSmithKline, and several other top drug makers¿and he usually wins big, recouping billions of dollars for federal and state governments, according to a recent profile in STAT magazine. Guttman talked about bad behavior in the drug industry, and whom he trusts for his own medical care.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown for CNN: Scalia's misguided 'mismatch theory' comments

In Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is reported to have said: "There are those who contend that it does not benefit African-Americans to get them into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less-advanced school, a less--a slower-track school where they do well." He was referring to the "mismatch theory." That theory couldn't be more wrong, writes Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown.

Freer comments on MLB lawsuit involving 6-year-old hit by foul ball

Freer comments on MLB lawsuit involving 6-year-old hit by foul ball

The father of a 6-year-old whose skull was shattered by a foul ball at Turner Field in 2010 has amended his lawsuit to include Major League Baseball as a defendant. The suit originally claimed the Atlanta Braves were at fault for not extending netting farther into foul-ball territory. Now, the father says MLB should turn over results from its investigations of players for performance-enhancing drugs, that allow players to hit harder, faster balls. Professor Richard Freer commented on the case.

Brown says police shooting discussions have evolved in Ferguson class

Brown says police shooting discussions have evolved in Ferguson class

On WABE's "Closer Look," Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown discussed her class exploring the "Ferguson Movement" and how the discussions over police-involved shootings have changed over the course of the semester.