Emory Law News Center

June 2017 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash on why Supreme Court saw travel ban differently

In Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project, the Supreme Court stayed portions of lower courts' preliminary injunctions, "thus allowing substantial swaths of the temporary travel ban to go into effect. The cases may not ultimately result in a complete victory for the Trump administration (insofar as the Court has yet to rule on the merits, and issues of potential mootness loom over the case)," Professor Jonathan Nash writes for The Hill.

Georgiev: Securities laws are speed bumps that prevent Uber-sized wrecks

Georgiev: Securities laws are speed bumps that prevent Uber-sized wrecks

Uber's recent troubles and ouster of its CEO is not unusual for a Silicon Valley startup. But Uber is no ordinary private start-up. "For Uber to reform itself, the private company needs to behave like a public one." Emory Law Professor George S. Georgiev writes for The Hill.

Holbrook on Supreme Court reversals of federal circuit patent cases

Holbrook on Supreme Court reversals of federal circuit patent cases

The Supreme Court took up six patent cases--8 percent of its docket last term--and reversed the Federal Circuit on each. Professor Tim Holbrook was quoted by the National Law Journal on the issue. He doesn't think the unanimous reversals are a black eye on the Federal Circuit as much as they reflect a generalist Supreme Court trying to speak with one voice to bolster its credibility with the specialized appellate court. The large number of cert grants reflect a Supreme Court that's both interested in patent law and concerned about the Federal Circuit as an institution, he said.

Timothy R. Holbrook

Holbrook for CNN: Will Justice Roberts save same-sex marriage?

If a Supreme Court Justice steps down in the next few years, and President Donald Trump appoints another, there undoubtedly will be challenges to Obergefell v. Hodges, even if Trump views same-sex marriage as settled, Professor Timothy Holbrook writes for CNN. "A new justice could easily vote to overrule Obergefell. But the chief justice's vote in Pavan may be a harbinger of a willingness to protect the hard-earned rights of marriage equality. At least it is a glimmer of hope to the LGBTQ community."

Mary L. Dudziak

Dudziak keynote: 'American Experience with War and Death'

Asa Candler Griggs Professor of Law Mary Dudziak was featured recently on C-SPAN, delivering the keynote address at the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations annual meeting, titled, "American Experience with War and Death." Dudziak, a leading U.S. legal historian, is the society's president.

Jonathan R. Nash

Nash: Trump's success at reshaping lower federal courts

"With controversy seemingly engulfing the Trump administration on a daily basis, it is noteworthy that the president earlier this month announced a second substantial slate of lower federal court judicial nominees," Professor Jonathan Nash writes for The Hill. "This slate of judges confirms three aspects of the president's strategy for selecting judges for the federal courts that the previous slate suggested."

Dowd 65L joins Trump's defense team

Dowd 65L joins Trump's defense team

President Donald Trump has added veteran Washington lawyer John Dowd 65L to the team representing him in the investigations of possible collusion by the Trump campaign with Russia, Reuters reports, including the criminal probe being led by special counsel Robert Mueller.

U.S. District Judge Cohen 79L orders immigrant's DACA status reinstated

U.S. District Judge Cohen 79L orders immigrant's DACA status reinstated

A Mexican woman whose highly publicized deportation case in Georgia thrust her into the national debate over immigration may stay in the United States and be temporarily protected from deportation, U.S. District Judge Mark H. Cohen 79L ruled on June 12, The New York Times reports.

Jonathan R. Nash

4th Circuit judges voted along party lines on travel ban, Nash says

Did politics play a part in the Fourth Circuit's 10-3 decision to enjoin enforcement of President Trump's proposed travel ban? "It is hardly surprising that, faced with a highly politically salient and divisive case, a court comprised lopsidedly of judges appointed by Democratic Presidents would vote overwhelmingly in a liberal direction," Emory Law Professor Jonathan Nash writes for The Hill.