Emory Law News Center

October 2017 In the News Archive | Emory University School of Law

Dudziak in the Atlantic: Russian social media tactics = new propaganda

Dudziak in the Atlantic: Russian social media tactics = new propaganda

The Internet Research Agency--a Russian "troll factory"--used social media and Google during the 2016 electoral campaign to deepen political and racial tensions in the United States, the Atlantic reports. Except for the technology used, however, these tactics are not exactly new. The Cold War coincided with the beginning of the civil rights movement, and the two became intertwined in how the Soviets used the racial strife. "Early on in the Cold War, there was a recognition that the U.S. couldn't lead the world if it was seen as repressing people of color," Emory Law Professor Mary Dudziak says.

Goldfeder in the Monitor: The current status of church, money, taxes

Goldfeder in the Monitor: The current status of church, money, taxes

In a Christian Science Monitor story on church and state, Emory Law Senior Lecturer Mark Goldfeder notes a long-running debate over religious-secular school choice programs may already be resolved. Seventeen states have instituted versions of "scholarship tax credit programs," which allow individuals and corporations to set aside a portion of the state taxes they owe and donate them to nonprofit organizations that issue scholarships to grade school and high school students. "It's interesting in the overall scheme of things, because what these programs do, they take religion out of it," he said, noting such programs have already passed constitutional muster.

Dorothy A.  Brown

Brown for CNN: Kelly's disservice in Gold Star family controversy

Trump's Chief of Staff, Gen. John Kelly, was wrong to call Congresswoman Frederica Wilson an "empty barrel" at a recent press conference concerning President Trump's phone call to the family of a serviceman killed in Niger, Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown writes for CNN. Nor should he have misquoted her 2015 comments at the dedication of an FBI building. "With this press conference, Kelly has done his president and the country a disservice. He took a tragic situation and made it worse. He owes his boss and the country an apology," Brown writes.

Frank J.  Vandall

Daily Report: Vandall's suggestions for gun control

In the wake of the Las Vegas mass shooting that left 58 dead, Emory Law Professor Frank Vandall suggests some ways to prevent such tragedies. "There are steps that can be taken short of the confiscation of guns," he writes for the Daily Report.

Timothy R. Holbrook

Holbrook for CNN: Sessions transgender statement 'just wrong'

In memo aimed at dismantling discrimination protections for transgender persons, Attorney General Jeff Sessions gets the law wrong, Emory Law Professor Timothy Holbrook writes for CNN. "The attorney general and Department of Justice do not get to decide what 'is a conclusion of law.' The courts do. And the courts have recognized that federal law does protect transgender people as a form of discrimination based on sex," he says.

SCOTUS decision on gerrymandering will affect Georgia, Kang tells WABE

SCOTUS decision on gerrymandering will affect Georgia, Kang tells WABE

WABE interviewed Emory Law Professor Michael Kang about Gill v. Whitford, the gerrymandering case argued before the U.S. Supreme Court this week, on how it could affect Georgia elections. "Georgia is definitely a big partisan gerrymandering state," he said. "Any decision on the law of partisan gerrymandering is likely to have some sort of impact here." State Republicans solidified their power thanks to districts they drew in 2011, Kang said, and Democrats tried to do the same back in 2001. "Even when the majority party is doing a bad job, it's very hard to throw them out because the deck is stacked in their favor," he added.

Brown on Marketplace: How the tax code is social policy

Brown on Marketplace: How the tax code is social policy

There's a reason politicians prefer tax code spending over spending through the budget, Marketplace reports. Because once policy is in place, it doesn't come up for review like budget spending does. "When you start talking about changing these tax expenditures, changing the provisions of the code, then it becomes public again," said Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown. If you take away that tax break you sold before, it looks like a tax increase. "Everybody comes out of the woodwork and says this is the worst thing possible."

Proposed GOP tax cuts benefit whites, wealthy, Brown tells NPR

Proposed GOP tax cuts benefit whites, wealthy, Brown tells NPR

NPR asked Emory Law Professor Dorothy Brown to discuss the GOP's latest tax proposal, and she found it will likely benefit those who are wealthy and white. Keeping the mortgage interest deduction will "benefit more whites than blacks and Latinos, who don't own homes to the same extent," Brown said on Weekend Edition. And "retirement plans from private employers tend to go to those who hold jobs at the higher incomes which, again, tend to be disproportionately white. So we know that even with the minimal sketching that we see in the Trump tax plan, rich, white Americans are going to benefit the most."